Calories in a lemon

Calories in a lemon DEFAULT

How Many Calories Does a Lemon Have?

Lemons are a very versatile fruit. They may be used as seasoning for other foods or used in lemonade and other fruit juices. According to herbs2000.com, eating lemons may ease the acidity in your stomach when eaten regularly.

Calories

One lemon without the skin is equivalent to one serving and contains 17 calories; two of these calories are from fat. One serving of lemon with the peel contains 22 calories, with three of these calories from fat, according to FatSecret.

Vitamins and Minerals

Vitamins in Lemons

Lemons, peeled and with the skin, are good sources of vitamin C. One lemon with the peel contains: 139 percent of the daily value, or DV, of vitamin C; 7 percent of the DV of calcium; and 4 percent of the DV of iron. One lemon with no peel contains 51 percent of the DV of vitamin C, 2 percent of the DV of calcium and 2 percent of the DV of iron. The lemon does not contain any cholesterol.

Other Nutrients

Each serving of skinless lemons contains 80 mg of potassium, 5.41 g of total carbohydrates, 1.6 g of dietary fiber, 1 mg of sodium and 1.45 g of sugars. One lemon with the peel contains 157 mg of potassium, 11.56 g of total carbohydrates, 5.1 g of dietary fiber and 3 mg of sodium.

References

Writer Bio

Michelle Lawson began her professional writing career in 2010, with her work appearing on various websites. She emphasizes alternative approaches to health-related issues. She is certified as a Sports Nutritionist by the International Fitness Association. Lawson graduated from ATI College of Health with honors, earning her associate degree in medical assisting.

Sours: https://healthfully.com/how-many-calories-does-a-lemon-have-6252758.html

Lemon

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size1 fruit (2-1/8" dia)

Amount Per Serving

Calories

17

 

% Daily Values*

Total Fat

0.17g

0%

Saturated Fat

0.023g

0%

Trans Fat

-

Polyunsaturated Fat

0.052g

Monounsaturated Fat

0.006g

Cholesterol

0mg

0%

Sodium

1mg

0%

Total Carbohydrate

5.41g

2%

Dietary Fiber

1.6g

6%

Sugars

1.45g

Protein

0.64g

Vitamin D

-

Calcium

15mg

1%

Iron

0.35mg

2%

Potassium

80mg

2%

Vitamin A

1mcg

0%

Vitamin C

30.7mg

34%

1%

of RDI*

(17 calories)

1% of RDI

Calorie Breakdown:

 

Carbohydrate (84%)

 

Fat (6%)

 

Protein (10%)

Photos

Nutrition summary:

Calories

17

Fat

0.17g

Carbs

5.41g

Protein

0.64g

There are 17 calories in 1 Lemon.
Calorie breakdown: 6% fat, 84% carbs, 10% protein.

Other Common Serving Sizes:

Related Types of Fruit:

See Also:

Sours: https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nutrition/generic/lemon-raw?portionid=19194&portionamount=1.000
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Lemons 101: Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Lemons (Citrus limon) are among the world’s most popular citrus fruits.

They grow on lemon trees and are a hybrid of the original citron and lime.

There are many ways to enjoy lemons, but they taste very sour and are usually not eaten alone or as a whole fruit.

Instead, they’re often a garnish with meals, and their juice is often used to provide a sour flavor. They are a key ingredient in lemonade.

A great source of vitamin C and fiber, lemons contain many plant compounds, minerals, and essential oils.

These yellow fruits also have many potential health benefits. Eating lemons may lower your risk of heart disease, cancer, and kidney stones.

This article tells you everything you need to know about lemons.

Nutrition facts

Lemons contain very little fat and protein. They consist mainly of carbs (10%) and water (88–89%).

A medium lemon provides only about 20 calories.

The nutrients in 1/2 cup (100 grams) of raw, peeled lemon are ():

  • Calories: 29
  • Water: 89%
  • Protein: 1.1 grams
  • Carbs: 9.3 grams
  • Sugar: 2.5 grams
  • Fiber: 2.8 grams
  • Fat: 0.3 grams

Carbs

The carbohydrates in lemons are primarily composed of fibers and simple sugars, such as glucose, fructose, and sucrose ().

Fiber

The main fiber in lemons is pectin.

Soluble fibers like pectin can lower blood sugar levels by slowing down the digestion of sugar and starch ().

Dietary fibers are an important part of a healthy diet and linked to numerous health benefits (, ).

SUMMARY

Lemons contain approximately 10% carbs, which are mostly soluble fibers and simple sugars. Their main fiber is pectin, which may help lower blood sugar levels.

Vitamins and minerals

Lemons provide several vitamins and minerals.

  • Vitamin C. An essential vitamin and antioxidant, vitamin C is important for immune function and skin health (, ).
  • Potassium. A diet high in potassium can lower blood pressure levels and have positive effects on heart health ().
  • Vitamin B6. A group of related vitamins, B6 is involved in converting food into energy.
SUMMARY

Lemons are very rich in vitamin C. In addition, they’re a decent source of potassium and vitamin B6.

Other plant compounds

Plant compounds are natural bioactive substances found in plants, some of which have powerful health benefits.

The plant compounds in lemons and other citrus fruit may have beneficial effects on cancer, cardiovascular disease, and inflammation (, , ).

These are the main plant compounds in lemons:

  • Citric acid. The most abundant organic acid in lemons, citric acid may help prevent the formation of kidney stones.
  • Hesperidin. This antioxidant may strengthen your blood vessels and prevent atherosclerosis — the buildup of fatty deposits (plaque) inside your arteries (11, ).
  • Diosmin. An antioxidant used in some drugs that affect the circulatory system, diosmin improves muscle tone and reduces chronic inflammation in your blood vessels (13).
  • Eriocitrin. This antioxidant is found in lemon peel and juice (13, ).
  • D-limonene. Found primarily in the peel, d-limonene is the main component of lemon essential oils and responsible lemons’ distinct aroma. In isolation, it can relieve heartburn and stomach reflux ().

Many of the plant compounds in lemons are not found in high amounts in lemon juice, so it is recommended to eat the whole fruit — excluding the peel — for maximum benefit (16, ).

SUMMARY

Lemons contain plant compounds that provide various health benefits. These compounds include citric acid, hesperidin, diosmin, eriocitrin, and d-limonene.

Health benefits of lemons

Citrus fruits, including lemons, are associated with numerous health benefits.

Their vitamins and fiber, as well as their powerful plant compounds, are likely responsible (18).

Heart health

Heart disease, including heart attacks and strokes, is the world’s most common cause of death.

Intake of fruits high in vitamin C is linked to reduced heart disease risk (, ).

Low levels of vitamin C in the blood are also associated with increased risk of stroke, especially among those who are overweight or have high blood pressure (, ).

Intake of isolated fibers from citrus fruits has been shown to decrease blood cholesterol levels, and the essential oils in lemons can protect LDL (bad) cholesterol particles from becoming oxidized (23, 24).

Recent studies in rats show that the plant compounds hesperidin and diosmin may have beneficial effects on some key risk factors for heart disease (25, , ).

Prevention of kidney stones

The citric acid in lemons may reduce your risk of kidney stones (, ).

Some studies have shown that lemon juice and lemonade can be effective at preventing kidney stones, but other studies have found no effect (, , ).

Anemia prevention

Anemia is often caused by iron deficiency and most common in pre-menopausal women.

Lemons contain small amounts of iron, but they are a great source of vitamin C and citric acid, which can increase the absorption of iron from other foods (, ).

Because lemons can enhance the absorption of iron from foods, they may help prevent anemia.

Cancer

Lemons may help reduce the risk of many types of cancers, including breast cancer. This is thought to be due to plant compounds like hesperidin and d-limonene (, , , , , , , ).

SUMMARY

Lemons may help protect against anemia, prevent the formation of kidney stones, and reduce your risk of heart disease and cancer.

Lemon water

Many people drink lemon water — either hot or cold — a few times per day.

The recipe is usually freshly squeezed juice from 1/2–1 lemon in a cup (240 ml) of water.

Drinking water with freshly squeezed lemon may have some health benefits.

Lemon water is a rich source of vitamin C and plant compounds, which can enhance immune function, protect against various diseases, and increase your absorption of iron (, , , ).

The citric acid in lemons decreases your risk of kidney stones by diluting urine and increasing its citrate content ().

Given that some pulp goes into the mix, pectins in the pulp can promote fullness and feed the friendly bacteria in your gut, therein promoting good health and decreased risk of disease ().

To top things off, the lemon aroma derived from the essential oils might decrease stress and improve mood ().

Lemonade should have similar health benefits — except for the frequently added sugar, which is unhealthy when consumed in excess.

SUMMARY

Drinking lemon water may decrease stress, enhance immune function, help prevent anemia, reduce your risk of kidney stones, and protect against several diseases.

Adverse effects

Lemons are generally well tolerated, but citrus fruit may cause allergic reactions in a small number of people ().

They may also cause contact allergy and skin irritation in people with dermatitis ().

Lemons are quite acidic, so eating them frequently may be harmful to dental health if your tooth enamel becomes damaged ().

SUMMARY

Lemons are usually well tolerated but may cause allergies or skin irritation in some people. Large amounts may be harmful to dental health.

The bottom line

Lemons are a refreshing fruit usually not eaten whole but rather as a garnish or flavoring.

They are an excellent source of vitamin C, soluble fibers, and plant compounds — all of which can provide health benefits.

If you’re interested in trying them out, lemons are sure to boost your health.

Sours: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/foods/lemons
How much calories in row lemon?

Lemon Nutrition Facts and Health Benefits

Known for adding flavor, freshness, and acidity to drinks and foods, lemons are the most commonly used citrus fruits. Lemons are also used for garnish and flavoring desserts. They can be juiced, cut into wedges, or grated to make lemon zest.

This versatile fruit is an excellent source of vitamin C. Lemons are naturally low in calories and carbohydrates and are available all year long. They are a perfect fruit to keep on hand for salad dressings, seafood recipes, flavoring water, and more.

Lemon Nutrition Facts

One lemon (without rind) measuring approximately 2 1/8" in diameter (58g) provides 17 calories, 0.6g of protein, 5.4g of carbohydrates, and 0.2g of fat. Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C. The following nutrition information is provided by the USDA.

  • Calories: 17
  • Fat: 0.2g
  • Sodium: 1mg
  • Carbohydrates: 5.4g
  • Fiber: 1.6g
  • Sugars: 1.5g
  • Protein: 0.6g
  • Vitamin C: 30.7mg
  • Potassium: 80mg

Carbs

One whole lemon contains 17 calories and just over 5 grams of carbohydrate. The carbs are primarily fiber (1.6 grams) and sugar (1.5 grams). Note that the juice of a whole lemon provides only 0.14 grams of fiber, according to USDA data, but almost the same amount of sugar (1.2 grams).

The glycemic load of a whole lemon is estimated to be 1, making it a low-glycemic food.

Fats

There is a very small amount of fat in lemons, under 1 gram if you consume the whole fruit.

Protein

Lemons are not a good source of protein, providing less than 1 gram per fruit.

Vitamins and Minerals

Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, providing over half (30.7mg) of your daily recommended intake. There are also minimal amounts of thiamin, vitamin B6, and folate in lemon.

Lemons are not a good source of minerals, but they do contain small amounts of calcium, iron, and potassium.

Summary

Lemons are an excellent source of vitamin C, and are low calorie and relatively high in fiber. They provide minimal amounts of other vitamins and minerals such as thiamin, vitamin B6, calcium, and potassium.

Health Benefits

The health benefits of lemons are attributed primarily to the high level of vitamin C that the fruit provides.

Prevents Vitamin C Deficiency

Lemons have been used throughout history to manage vitamin C deficiency. In the late 1700s, the British Navy discovered that scurvy, a disease caused by vitamin C deficiency, could be cured by eating lemons and oranges. Today, scurvy is a rare disease in developed countries, given that it can be prevented with as little as 10mg of vitamin C (and you'll get more than 30mg in a single lemon).

15 Healthy Foods That Are High in Vitamin C

Improves Heart Health

Studies indicate that a higher vitamin C intake is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), including coronary heart disease and stroke. The benefit is likely due to the antioxidant content of lemon, which helps to prevent oxidative damage that can lead to cardiovascular disease.

But authors of one large review were careful to put their findings into perspective. They concluded that while research suggests that vitamin C deficiency is associated with a higher risk of death from cardiovascular disease, and that vitamin C may slightly improve endothelial function and lipid profiles in some groups, studies do not provide enough support for the widespread use of vitamin C supplementation to reduce cardiovascular risk or mortality.

Slows Age-Related Decline

Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants help to prevent cell damage caused by oxidative stress. There is ongoing research about the possible impact that antioxidants can have on the aging process. There is some evidence that they may help improve skin health or even help prevent certain types of diseases associated with aging. So far, however, study results have been mixed.

Improves Eye Health

Researchers are investigating whether a higher intake of vitamin C can help treat or prevent age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and cataracts—common causes of vision decline in older adults. So far, study results have been inconsistent, but research is ongoing.

Supports Immune Function

Vitamin C has been shown to play an important role in immune function. And while some people take vitamin C supplements or use lemons to prevent or manage the treatment of the common cold, studies regarding its effectiveness have yielded mixed results.

A few large studies have shown that taking a vitamin C supplement of about 250 mg per day may help certain specific populations reduce the duration of the common colds. But other studies have shown no benefit in the general population.Also, it is important to note that studies investigating the relationship between the common cold and vitamin C examine supplements, not lemons.

May Help Prevent Some Cancers

Antioxidants, such as those in lemons, are being investigated for their potential impact on cancer.

According to the National Cancer Institute, increased levels of antioxidants may prevent the types of free radical damage associated with cancer development. Free radicals are chemicals that can cause cellular damage in the body. Exposure to certain environmental toxins (like cigarette smoke) may increase the free radicals in your body and even cause the body to make more free radicals.

But researchers still don't know if antioxidants have the power to combat or prevent cancer. More research needs to be done investigating the impact of antioxidants from food versus antioxidant supplements. For now, there is not enough evidence to know for sure if there is any benefit.

Allergies

People with an allergy to citrus fruits should avoid lemon or products made with lemon or lemon zest. Citrus allergy is not common but can be problematic in some people.

There are also reports of asthma as a reaction to the inhalation of lemon or orange peel. If you suspect an allergy to lemon, seek care from a qualified allergy specialist.

Adverse Effects

The acid in lemon juice can strip the enamel on teeth, making them weak and sensitive. If you tend to drink water with lemon often, using a straw can reduce the exposure of acid to your teeth.

According to the Natural Medicines Database, it is not known if there are drug interactions with lemon. However, one study indicated that there may be a positive impact on certain nuclear imaging tests when men ingest lemon juice prior to testing.

Varieties

There are many different types of lemons. Most are bright yellow, but some have a green hue. Interestingly, one of the most common varieties—the Meyer lemon—is not a true lemon, but a cross between a lemon and a mandarin or orange.

The lemons you buy at the grocery store are likely to be Lisbon, Bearss, or Eureka. These common varieties are grown in California, Florida, and Arizona.

When It’s Best

You can find most lemons in the grocery all year round. Many growers harvest their fruit year-round, but the peak harvest season is late winter to early spring or summer.

When picking lemons, look for fruit that has thin skin, as this is an indicator of juiciness. Lemons should feel heavy for their size, appear bright, vibrant yellow, and have a smooth, blemish-free surface. Avoid lemons that are soft and spongy or have wrinkled skin.

Storage and Food Safety

Many people store lemons on the countertop to take advantage of their bright, beautiful color. But if you keep lemons out at room temperature, they are likely to last only for about a week.

To help them last longer, store lemons in the refrigerator. Some people place them in a bowl of water, but you can also place them in a plastic bag for optimal shelf life.

You can also freeze Lemons. Freeze whole lemons, lemon wedges, or lemon juice in freezer bags with as much air removed as possible.

Lemons can also help your other foods last longer.Certain produce, such as apples, turn brown when they begin to oxidize. The process is called enzymatic browning and occurs when certain enzymes and chemicals, known as phenolic compounds, combine and react to oxygen. The brown pigment, melanin, is completely harmless but not very appealing.

Other foods, such as pears, bananas, avocado, eggplants, and potatoes, also undergo enzymatic browning. The acidic nature of lemon juice prevents browning by denaturing the enzymes. To make these foods last longer, rub lemon or lemon juice on any exposed part of the fruit.

How to Prepare

You can eat a whole lemon, but you probably won't want to. Their intense sour flavor makes them difficult to eat on their own. Instead, use lemons to add color and flavor to all different types of cuisines and recipes.

Make your own salad dressing, using lemon juice as a nutritious way to reduce your sodium and calorie intake. Spice up your vegetables or fish with a lemony sauce. Cut up lemon wedges or slices to flavor your water or seltzer, use lemon juice in fruit salads to prevent browning, or as an ingredient in marinades to tenderize meat. Lemons and lemon juice can also be important ingredients in healthier dessert options.

You can use the peel of a lemon for lemon zest (the yellow, outer skin). To zest a lemon, use a peeler or a grater, taking care not to cut the bitter inner white skin, called the pith.

Recipes

Healthy Lemon Recipes to Try

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Fit uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. Lemon, raw, without peel. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  2. Lemon juice, raw. FoodData Central. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Published April 1, 2019.

  3. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements. Vitamin C: Fact sheet for health professionals. Updated March 26, 2021.

  4. Moser MA, Chun OK. Vitamin C and heart health: A review based on findings from epidemiologic studies. Int J Mol Sci. 2016;17(8):1328. doi:10.3390/ijms17081328

  5. Obrenovich ME, Li Y, Parvathaneni K, et al. Antioxidants in health, disease and aging. CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets. 2011;10(2):192-207. doi:10.2174/187152711794480375

  6. National Cancer Institute. Antioxidants and cancer prevention. Updated February 6, 2017.

  7. American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. Citric acid and citrus allergy. 2020.

  8. American Dental Association. Top 9 foods that damage your teeth.

  9. Natural Medicines Database. Lemon. 2019.

  10. Chen M, Zhou SY, Fabriaga E, Zhang PH, Zhou Q. Food-drug interactions precipitated by fruit juices other than grapefruit juice: An update review. J Food Drug Anal. 2018;26(2S):S61-S71. doi:10.1016/j.jfda.2018.01.009

Sours: https://www.verywellfit.com/lemons-nutrition-facts-calories-and-health-benefits-4114176

In a lemon calories

Calories In Lemon: Here's Why You Should Add The Tarty Goodness In Your Diet

Known for adding a tarty flavour to curries, rice, beverages, salads and even puddings, lemons are a blessing in disguise and are one of the healthiest citrus fruits. Often used as garnishing, lemons can be juiced, cut into wedges, rounds or grated to make lemon zest. These delights, according to the book Healing Foodsby DK Publishing, come power-packed with vitamin C that helps reduce the risk of heart-diseases, kidney stones, and infections of all kinds. It also helps boost digestion and have alkalising and detoxifying properties. Moreover, lemons are super low in calories; so you can add them everywhere without having to worry about adding kilos to your body. Let's look at how many calories are there in lemon along with its numerous health benefits and some recipes to make your day!

Calories in Lemon

According to United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), calories in lemon are just 29 in about 100 grams. Lemon provides non-fat, low-sodium and low-calorie flavours to various delicacies and beverages. Basically, the calorie intake from lemons is negligible because a small amount of lemon juice is used as opposed to eating the whole fruit, considering it is sour. The calories in lemon come from one gram of carbohydrate.

According to the American Diabetes Association, lemon contains six percent of your daily value of vitamin C based on a 2,000 calorie diet. The juice has about three milligrams of sodium per tablespoon.

(Also Read: Is Too Much Lemon Juice Bad For You Health? Here's The Answer)
lemon water

Calories in lemon: Lemon water can help in treating acid reflux
 

Benefits of Lemon

Here are a few reasons why you should definitely add lemons to your daily diet:

  1. According to the book Healing Foods, use the peel as it is full of antioxidants and has a high concentration of the fruit's limonoids. Modern science shows citrus peels fight free radicals, balances blood sugar levels, and supports thyroid health.
  2. The vitamin C in citrus fruits helps the body absorb non-heme iron, a form of iron from plant sources, like vegetables.
  3. Lemon juice helps clear out toxins from the body.
  4. Lemons are alkaline in nature, reducing acidity, pain and inflammation.
  5. Lemon juice helps in preventing the formation of kidney stones.
  6. It has anti-ageing and anti-inflammatory properties.
  7. When applied to skin and hair, lemon juice can manage skin disorders, acne, tan, blemishes and dandruff.
  8. Lemons help in controlling blood pressure as they are rich in potassium.
  9. The vitamin C in lemons is an immunity booster.
  10. Mixed with hot water, lemon juice can relieve heartburn, nausea, acid indigestion and stomach aches.
(Also Read: 6 Ingenious Lemon Hacks You Will Thank Us For​)
lemon

Calories in lemon: The vitamin C in citrus fruits helps the body absorb non-heme iron


How To Use Lemons In Your Daily Diet; Recipes You'd Love!

Now that you have known the amount of calories in lemon, you can add this sour delight in your dishes. Here are a few recipes that you can prepare to reap maximum benefits from lemons.

1. Lemony Hummus with Basil Dressing Recipe

Recipe by Plavaneeta Borah

This recipe makes for a perfect summer dip; the flavours of which are refreshing and rejuvenating. Use this amazingly quick and light recipe with accompaniments like pita bread.

2. Lemon Rice

Recipe by Chef Niru Gupta

A squeeze of lime can make everything better. This quick and easy rice preparation is enhanced with distinct flavours of lemon juice, turmeric, curry leaves, chillies and mustard seeds.

lemon rice

Calories in lemon: A squeeze of lime can make everything better

3. Lemon Squash

Recipe by Chef Niru Gupta

What's better than a homemade lemon squash to beat the summer heat? Well, we all love a glassful of it; don't we? All you need is some sugar, lemon juice and water to make this rejuvenating drink.

4. Asparagus with Sesame and Lemon Recipe

Recipe by Chef Divya Burman

Crunchy asparagus with roasted sesame seeds tossed in olive oil and lemon juice drizzled on it; delicious much?(Also Read: 5 Quick and Sure-shot Ways to Get More Juice Out of Lemon)

asparagus

Calories in lemon: It is a nutrient-dense vegetable which is high in folic acid

5. Lemon Pudding

Recipe by Chef Manju Malhi

A sweet milk-based pudding that is lime and lemony! Bring together eggs, lemon juice, lemon zest, sugar, cinnamon and milk to make this delicious and unmissable sweet.

Low-calorie and super-healthy, lemon is surely a superfood we all need to add in our daily diets. So go on and make some refreshing delicacies and drinks using this tarty delight.


 

For the latest food news, health tips and recipes, like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter and YouTube.

Sours: https://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/calories-in-lemon-heres-why-you-should-add-the-tarty-goodness-in-your-diet-1858895
20 Effortless Healthy Food Swaps To Cut Thousands Of Calories

Lemons (with Peel)

Nutrition Facts

Serving Size1 fruit without seeds

Amount Per Serving

Calories

22

 

% Daily Values*

Total Fat

0.32g

0%

Saturated Fat

0.042g

0%

Trans Fat

-

Polyunsaturated Fat

0.096g

Monounsaturated Fat

0.012g

Cholesterol

0mg

0%

Sodium

3mg

0%

Total Carbohydrate

11.56g

4%

Dietary Fiber

5.1g

18%

Sugars

-

Protein

1.3g

Vitamin D

-

Calcium

66mg

5%

Iron

0.76mg

4%

Potassium

157mg

3%

Vitamin A

2mcg

0%

Vitamin C

83.2mg

92%

1%

of RDI*

(22 calories)

1% of RDI

Calorie Breakdown:

 

Carbohydrate (85%)

 

Fat (5%)

 

Protein (10%)

Photos

Nutrition summary:

Calories

22

Fat

0.32g

Carbs

11.56g

Protein

1.3g

There are 22 calories in 1 Lemon.
Calorie breakdown: 5% fat, 85% carbs, 10% protein.

Common Serving Sizes:

Related Types of Fruit:

See Also:

Used in these Member Recipes:

Sours: https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nutrition/usda/lemons-(with-peel)

Now discussing:

Lemons: Health Benefits & Nutrition Facts

When life gives you lemons … you're in luck. Lemons are full of vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients and antioxidants. They are especially good sources of vitamin C and folate.

Lemons are one of the most popular acid citrus fruits, according to the Purdue University Horticultural Department. Their origin is unknown, though some horticulturists theorize they come from Northern India. Lemons grow throughout southern Europe, the Middle East, and into East Asia. They were brought to the New World by Christopher Columbus in 1493. Today, the leading lemon producers are California, Arizona, Italy, Spain, Greece, Turkey, Cyprus, Lebanon, South Africa and Australia. 

Lemons are available throughout the year but summer is their peak season. Lemons are an extremely versatile fruit. You can eat them in slices, sip healthy lemon water, make lemonade, garnish food with them, candy their peels, and use their juice and peels in cooking and more. 

Nutrient profile

"Lemons are high in vitamin C, folate, potassium, flavonoids and compounds called limonins," said Alissa Rumsey, a New York City-based registered dietitian, certified strength and conditioning specialist and spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "Limonins are found in the juice of the lemon."

According to World's Healthiest Foods, a quarter cup of lemon juice contains 31 percent of the recommended daily intake of vitamin C and 3 percent of folate and 2 percent of potassium — all for around 13 calories. A whole raw lemon contains 139 percent of the recommended daily vitamin C intake and has 22 calories. 

Recent studies have examined the role of lemons in accessing carotenoids, which are beneficial phytonutrients, from other foods during the digestive process. Carotenoids can have low bioaccessibility and bioavailability, meaning that even if you eat a carotenoid-rich food like carrots, you might not absorb many of the carotenoids. A 2018 study in International Journal of Nutrition and Food Engineering found that the carotenoids in boiled or mashed carrots, when combined with lemon juice, olive oil and whey curd, were nearly 30 percent more bioaccessible than without. This suggests that lemons can be an effective exigent food, meaning that, in addition to their own nutritional properties, they can unleash benefits from other foods when combined with them.

Here are the nutrition facts for lemons, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which regulates food labeling through the National Labeling and Education Act:

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Amt per serving%DVAmt per serving%DV
Total Fat 2g0%Total Carbohydrate 5g2%
Cholesterol 0mg0%
Protein 0g
Vitamin A0%Vitamin C40%
Calcium2%Iron0%

SOURCE: USDA

Health benefits

Immunity

"Vitamin C is plays a role in immunity and helps neutralize free radicals in our body," said Rumsey. According to the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, vitamin C stimulates the production of white blood cells and may protect the integrity of immune cells. Vitamin C helps protect leukocytes, which produces antiviral substances. 

Heart health

"Folic acid is said to aid in preventing strokes and may contribute to helping cardiovascular health by lowering homocysteine levels," Rumsey said. A 2010 meta-analysis published in The European Journal of Internal Medicine found that results from clinical studies examining folic acid and heart attacks were inconclusive but folic acid consumption can result in a modest improvement in stroke reduction. 

Vitamin C, too, is linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, said Rumsey. A 2015 study published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition looked at more than 100,000 people and found that those who ate the most fruits and vegetables had a 15 percent lower risk of developing heart disease. Those with the highest vitamin C levels in their plasma had even more reduced rates of heart disease. 

Scientists theorize that vitamin C may have cardiovascular benefits because it is an antioxidant that protects against dangerous free radicals. It also may lower bad LDL cholesterol and keep arteries flexible, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center.

"Studies have also shown the effect of limonin on lowering cholesterol," said Rumsey. In a 2007 study published in Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, men and women who had high cholesterol were given limonin and vitamin E daily for a month and their cholesterol levels lowered 20 to 30 percent. The researchers think that limonin reduces apolipoprotein B, which is associated with higher cholesterol levels. 

Kidney stones

Lemons and limes contain the most citric acid of any fruits, which makes them beneficial to those suffering from kidney stones. According to University of Wisconsin Health, citric acid deters stone formation and also breaks up small stones that are forming. The more citric acid in your urine, the more protected you are from forming new kidney stones. Half a cup of pure lemon juice every day or 32 ounces of lemonade has the same amount of citric acid as pharmacological therapy. 

Cancer

A 2011 study published in the Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Preventionfound that lemon extract applied to breast cancer cells induced cell death. The lemon extract was applied in-vitro, but the results may suggest powerful cancer-fighting properties in lemons.

"There are numerous studies being conducted to understand the role folate plays in cancer reduction," Rumsey said. A 2007 article in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition notes that folate's possible cancer-reducing properties are likely linked to its role in the production of substances that silence cancer DNA. The study points out, however, that some research has suggested that in some cases high levels of folate could actually encourage cancer cell growth. The authors write, "Folate may provide protection early in carcinogenesis and in individuals with a low folate status, yet it may promote carcinogenesis if administered later and potentially at very high intakes."

Limonins have also been linked to a decrease in cancer risk, said Rumsey. A 2012 article in the Journal of Nutrigenetics and Nutrigenomicslooked at limonins in breast cancer cells and found that they could be a helpful aid to chemotherapy. 

Pregnancy health

"Folate is essential for pregnant women in order to prevent neural tube defects," said Rumsey. While folate is present in prenatal vitamins, consuming it through whole foods is an excellent way to make sure the body absorbs it. 

Lemons, peels and weight loss

Rumsey said, "Lemons are a great, low-calorie way to flavor drinks and food." And indeed, lemons, lemon water and lemon peels have become popular with dieters. A 2017 Scientific Reports study of short-term juice-based diets, all of which had lemon juice as a primary ingredient, saw that participants' intestinal microbiota associated with weight loss had improved, their vasodilator nitric oxide had increased and the oxidation of their lipids had decreased, resulting in improved wellbeing overall. 

Rumsey added that the peels also contain many nutrients. "Grating the peels and adding to salads, chicken or fish dishes can add a citrusy flavor. Peels can also be blended into smoothies or soups." But she emphasized against treating them like a magic bullet for detoxing and weight loss. 

Liver disease

New research in BioMed Research International suggests lemons may help damaged livers. The 2017 animal study found that rats who had severely damaged livers from alcohol intake saw liver improvement after consuming lemon juice. Lemon juice significantly inhibited negative effects associated with liver disease. More study is needed to determine if humans would see similar protective effects. 

Antimicrobial properties

Lemons are known for their antimicrobial properties. A 2017 book, "Phytochemicals in Citrus: Applications in Functional Foods,"describes how solvents made with lemon peel show antimicrobial activity against salmonella, staphylococcus and other pathogenic bacteria. A 2017 study in The Journal of Functional Foods found that fermented sweet lemon juice showed antibacterial activity against E. coli bacteria.

Contaminated nuts are a major source of human exposure to mycotoxin aflatoxin B1. Aflatoxins are carcinogens associated with liver cancer in cases of high exposure, according to the National Cancer Institute. A 2017 study in Food Control found that lemon juice can be effective in preventing exposure from contaminated nuts. Researchers roasted contaminated pistachio nuts in 30 ml of water, 15 ml of lemon juice and 2.25 g of citric acid at 120 degrees Celsius for 1 hour and saw that the nuts' level of aflatoxin B1 was reduced significantly to a much safer level without harm to the pistachios. 

Risks of consuming lemons

In general, lemons are quite good for you, but if consumed in excess, can cause gastric reflux problems or heartburn for those who suffer from the conditions. Additionally, the citric acid can wear down the enamel on your teeth, according to World's Healthiest Foods, which encourages drinking lemon water through a straw. 

Sours: https://www.livescience.com/54282-lemon-nutrition.html


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