Another word for flow

Another word for flow DEFAULT

Synonyms of flow in English:

flow


See US English definition of flow

See UK English definition of flow

See Spanish definition of fluir

verb

1‘the water flowed down the channel she had dug’

SYNONYMS

run, move, go along, course, pass, proceed, glide, slide, drift, circulate, trickle, dribble, drizzle, spill, gurgle, babble, ripple

stream, swirl, surge, sweep, gush, cascade, pour, roll, rush, whirl, well, spurt, spout, squirt, spew, jet

leak, seep, ooze, percolate, drip

2‘many questions flow from today's announcement’

SYNONYMS

result, proceed, arise, follow, ensue, derive, stem, accrue

originate, emanate, spring, emerge

be caused by, be brought about by, be produced by, originate in


noun

1‘the pump produces a good flow of water’

SYNONYMS

movement, motion, course, passage, current, flux, drift, circulation

stream, swirl, surge, sweep, gush, roll, rush, welling, spate, tide, spurt, squirt, jet, outpouring, outflow

trickle, leak, seepage, ooze, percolation, drip


Sours: https://www.lexico.com/synonyms/flow

Frequently Asked Questions About flow

How does the verb flow differ from other similar words?

Some common synonyms of flow are arise, derive, emanate, issue, originate, proceed, rise, spring, and stem. While all these words mean "to come up or out of something into existence," flow adds to spring a suggestion of abundance or ease of inception.

words flowed easily from her pen

How do arise and rise relate to one another, in the sense of flow?

Arise and rise may both convey the fact of coming into existence or notice but rise often stresses gradual growth or ascent.

new questions have arisen

slowly rose to prominence

When might derive be a better fit than flow?

The synonyms derive and flow are sometimes interchangeable, but derive implies a prior existence in another form.

the holiday derives from an ancient Roman feast

In what contexts can emanate take the place of flow?

The meanings of emanate and flow largely overlap; however, emanate applies to the coming of something immaterial (such as a thought) from a source.

reports emanating from the capital

When would issue be a good substitute for flow?

In some situations, the words issue and flow are roughly equivalent. However, issue suggests emerging from confinement through an outlet.

blood issued from the cut

When can originate be used instead of flow?

While in some cases nearly identical to flow, originate implies a definite source or starting point.

the fire originated in the basement

Where would proceed be a reasonable alternative to flow?

The words proceed and flow can be used in similar contexts, but proceed stresses place of origin, derivation, parentage, or logical cause.

advice that proceeds from the best of intentions

When is spring a more appropriate choice than flow?

The words spring and flow are synonyms, but do differ in nuance. Specifically, spring implies rapid or sudden emerging.

an idea that springs to mind

When could stem be used to replace flow?

While the synonyms stem and flow are close in meaning, stem implies originating by dividing or branching off from something as an outgrowth or subordinate development.

industries stemming from space research

Sours: https://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/flow
  1. Aberdeen angus bull for sale
  2. Napa 5 8 heater hose
  3. North shore gardens apartments

flow

This shows grade level based on the word's complexity.

This shows grade level based on the word's complexity.


verb (used without object)

to move along in a stream: The river flowed slowly to the sea.

to circulate: blood flowing through one's veins.

to stream or well forth: Warmth flows from the sun.

to issue or proceed from a source: Orders flowed from the office.

to menstruate.

to come or go as in a stream: A constant stream of humanity flowed by.

to proceed continuously and smoothly: Melody flowed from the violin.

to hang loosely at full length: Her hair flowed over her shoulders.

to abound in something: The tavern flowed with wine.

to rise and advance, as the tide (opposed to ebb).

verb (used with object)

to cause or permit to flow: to flow paint on a wall before brushing.

to cover with water or other liquid; flood.

noun

an act of flowing.

movement in or as if in a stream.

the rate of flowing.

the volume of fluid that flows through a passage of any given section during a unit of time: Oil flow of the well was 500 barrels a day.

something that flows; stream.

an outpouring or discharge of something, as in a stream: a flow of blood.

menstruation.

an overflowing; flood.

the rise of the tide (opposed to ebb).

Machinery. progressive distortion of a metal object under continuous service at high temperature.

Physics. the transference of energy: heat flow.

QUIZ

ARE YOU A TRUE BLUE CHAMPION OF THESE "BLUE" SYNONYMS?

We could talk until we're blue in the face about this quiz on words for the color "blue," but we think you should take the quiz and find out if you're a whiz at these colorful terms.

Question 1 of 8

Which of the following words describes “sky blue”?

Origin of flow

First recorded before 900; (verb) Middle English flowen, Old English flōwan; akin to Middle Low German vlōien, Old Norse flōa; (noun) late Middle English: “surge of a wave,” derivative of the verb

synonym study for flow

1. Flow,gush,spout,spurt refer to certain of the movements characteristic of fluids. Flow is the general term: Water flows. A stream of blood flows. To gush is to rush forth copiously from a cavity, in as large a volume as can issue therefrom, as the result of some strong impelling force: The water will gush out if the main breaks.Spout and spurt both imply the ejecting of a liquid from a cavity by some internal impetus given to it. Spout implies a rather steady, possibly well-defined, jet or stream, not necessarily of long duration but always of considerable force: A whale spouts.Spurt implies a forcible, possibly sudden, spasmodic, or intermittent issue or jet: The liquid spurted out suddenly when the bottle cap was pushed in.Spout applies only to liquids; the other terms apply also to gases.

OTHER WORDS FROM flow

flow·a·ble,adjectiveflow·a·bil·i·ty,nounre·flow,noun,verbun·der·flow,noun

WORDS THAT MAY BE CONFUSED WITH flow

floe, flow

Words nearby flow

flour mill, flour mite, flour moth, floury, flout, flow, flowage, flowback, flow breccia, flow chart, flow cleavage

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2021

MORE ABOUT FLOW

What is basic definition of flow?

Flow means to move along in a stream, as water does. Flow also means to circulate, as air does. Flow is used as a noun to mean movement as if in a stream. Flow has several other senses as a verb and a noun.

When something flows, it moves like water in a stream. When used literally, flow is almost always used to describe the movement of liquids or things that act like fluids. Flow is also often used figuratively to mean to move smoothly like water or a liquid.

  • Real-life examples: Water flows through pipes. Magma flows out of a volcano. People hope traffic flows through a city so they don’t get stuck in a traffic jam.
  • Used in a sentence: Roger lied so much that the lies flowed out of his mouth. 

Flow is also used in this sense as a noun to mean an act of flowing.

  • Used in a sentence: The huge dam redirects the flow of the river away from the city. 

Flow can also mean to circulate, especially in reference to liquids.

  • Used in a sentence: The heart makes sure blood flows throughout the body.

As a noun, flow means a continuous motion, like the flow of a stream. It usually refers to liquids but can refer to anything, literally or figuratively.

  • Used in a sentence: A flow of shoppers streamed into the mall. 

Where does flow come from?

The first records of flow come from before the 900s. It comes from the Old English verb flōwan. It is related to similar words with the same meaning, such as the Middle Low German vlōien and the Old Norse flōa.

Did you know ... ?

What are some other forms related to flow?

  • flowing (adjective, present tense verb)
  • flowable (adjective)
  • flowability (noun)
  • reflow (noun, verb)
  • underflow (noun)

What are some synonyms for flow?

What are some words that share a root or word element with flow

What are some words that often get used in discussing flow?

What are some words flow may be commonly confused with?

How is flow used in real life?

Flow is a common word that most often means to move like a streaming liquid.

Try using flow!

Which of the following is a synonym of flow?

A. stop
B. stream
C. radiate
D. orbit

Words related to flow

stream, tide, flood, outflow, progress, discharge, wind, movement, leakage, ebb, tumble, sweep, glide, leak, splash, percolate, swirl, circulate, swell, overflow

How to use flow in a sentence

  • This change could help to crack down on the unmoderated flow of information across groups, which can lead to spam and misinformation spreading quickly.

    Facebook tries to clean up Groups with new policies|Sarah Perez|September 17, 2020|TechCrunch

  • Ominously, the debris flow risk is shown to be high in areas recently burned, such as in the Santa Cruz Mountains.

    California wildfires may give way to massive mudslides|Ula Chrobak|September 17, 2020|Popular-Science

  • Greece and Cyprus are part of the EU, while Turkey is central to Europe’s efforts to curb the flow of migrants.

    Butterfly Effect: The Next U.S.-Russia Conflict Theater Could be the Mediterranean|Charu Kasturi|September 17, 2020|Ozy

  • That can include changes in the flow, temperature or saltiness of water, he notes.

    Soggy coastal soils? Here’s why ecologists love them|Alison Pearce Stevens|September 17, 2020|Science News For Students

  • Bridgewater has been moving into gold and inflation-linked bonds in its All Weather portfolio, diversifying the countries it invests in and finding more stocks with stable cash flow.

    Ray Dalio issues stark warning about U.S. dollar’s future as global reserve currency|Claire Zillman, reporter|September 16, 2020|Fortune

  • But the jokes flow at such a torrential pace that duds are soon forgotten; the best are even Spamalot-worthy.

    ‘Galavant’: A Drunken, Horny Musical Fairy Tale|Melissa Leon|January 5, 2015|DAILY BEAST

  • Ebb and flow, checks and balances, the center would hold, et cetera.

    A Veteran’s View: NYC Cold War Between Cops and City Hall|Matt Gallagher|December 29, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • “The lies of the government shocked us,” says Fatima, as the tears flow slowly from her eyes and down her cheek.

    A Sunni-Shia Love Story Imperiled by al Qaeda|Ruth Michaelson|December 26, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • But before a new tide of tourists can flow from Miami to Havana, Cuba will need to build more runways.

    Goodbye, Bahamas. Hello, Havana!|Clive Irving|December 18, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • Speak to the friends and people you need to root out in life and let that conversation flow.

    The Unbearable Whiteness of Protesting|Rawiya Kameir, Judnick Mayard|December 10, 2014|DAILY BEAST

  • The volcanic eruptions of the mountains on the west broke down its barriers, and let its waters flow.

    Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 60, No. 372, October 1846|Various

  • And Tom, aware that he winced, was also aware that something in his life congealed and stopped its normal flow.

    The Wave|Algernon Blackwood

  • The arrows represent the flow of money from each of these four categories to the others.

    Readings in Money and Banking|Chester Arthur Phillips

  • Its entrance into and exit from banks is a flow, but not a circulation against goods.

    Readings in Money and Banking|Chester Arthur Phillips

  • Therefore, the total circulation exceeds the total flow from and to banks by the amount flowing through "nondepositors."

    Readings in Money and Banking|Chester Arthur Phillips

British Dictionary definitions for flow


verb(mainly intr)

(of liquids) to move or be conveyed as in a stream

(of blood) to circulate around the body

to move or progress freely as if in a streamthe crowd flowed into the building

to proceed or be produced continuously and effortlesslyideas flowed from her pen

to show or be marked by smooth or easy movement

to hang freely or looselyher hair flowed down her back

to be present in abundancewine flows at their parties

an informal word for menstruate

(of tide water) to advance or riseCompare ebb (def. 1)

(tr)to cover or swamp with liquid; flood

(of rocks such as slate) to yield to pressure without breaking so that the structure and arrangement of the constituent minerals are altered

noun

the act, rate, or manner of flowinga fast flow

a continuous stream or discharge

continuous progression

the advancing of the tide

a stream of molten or solidified lava

the amount of liquid that flows in a given time

an informal word for menstruation

Scot
  1. a marsh or swamp
  2. an inlet or basin of the sea
  3. (capital when part of a name)Scapa Flow

flow of spiritsnatural happiness

Word Origin for flow

Old English flōwan; related to Old Norse flōa, Middle Low German vlōien, Greek plein to float, Sanskrit plavate he swims

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

Medical definitions for flow


v.

To move or run smoothly with unbroken continuity.

To circulate, as the blood in the body.

To menstruate.

n.

The smooth motion characteristic of fluids.

The volume of fluid or gas passing a given point per unit of time.

Menstrual discharge.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.

Other Idioms and Phrases with flow


see ebb and flow; go with the flow.

The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company.

Sours: https://www.dictionary.com/browse/flow
Fly Me To The Moon (Cover) by The Macarons Project

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Recent Queries

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Flow another word for

She became even better. you are blooming right. My Lizaveta. I want you.

The Macarons Project (Cover) - Fly Me To The Moon (Lyrics)

Benson. At the end of the day, I wouldn't mind sticking my dick in you, Suzie. And I think you could take almost all of it. But maybe your father is right. I know I can take it, and I want you to fuck me at the same time.

Similar news:

Today, the husband again surprises, gives the opportunity to another, naked, by the way, man to be next to his no less naked wife. And it doesn't matter that in the presence of a woman of this man. Julia knew her husband was not jealous, but there are limits to everything. That's a jerk.



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