Mercer county nj health department

Mercer county nj health department DEFAULT

Quick Facts

Mercer County New Jersey
Population (2018) 369,811 8,908,520
% of NJ Population (2018) 4.2% 100%
Land Area (sq mi) 224.56 7,354.22
Persons per Sq. Mile (2018) 1,646.8 1,211.3
Total Births (2018 - preliminary) 3,934 101,171
Total Deaths (2017) 2,849 74,881

You can find more Mercer County Quick Facts at US Census Bureau






Health Insurance Coverage: Percent uninsured, 2019

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Why Is This Important?

Lack of health insurance is strongly associated with lack of access to health care services, particularly preventive and primary care. The uninsured are significantly more likely to be in fair or poor health, to have unmet medical needs or surgical care, not to have had a physician or other health professional visit, and to lack satisfaction in quality of care received.

How Are We Doing?

With the implementation of the Affordable Care Act beginning in 2014, a distinct decrease was seen in the proportion of uninsured persons. The targets for persons under 19 years of age and Whites and Hispanics under 65 years of age were met by mid-decade, so new, more challenging targets were set.

What Is Being Done?

NJ FamilyCare is a federal- and state-funded health insurance program created to help qualified New Jersey residents of any age access affordable health insurance. NJ FamilyCare is for people who do not have employer insurance. Beginning January 2014, NJ FamilyCare - New Jersey's publicly funded health insurance program - includes CHIP, Medicaid and Medicaid expansion populations. That means qualified NJ residents of any age may be eligible for free or low cost health insurance that covers doctor visits, prescriptions, vision, dental care, mental health and substance use services and even hospitalization.

Healthy People Objective AHS-1.1:

Increase the proportion of persons with health insurance: Medical insurance
U.S. Target: 100 percent


Note

The margins of error used in SAHIE are 90% confidence levels.

Measure Description for Health Insurance Coverage

Definition: Percentage of New Jersey residents with or without health insurance coverage

Numerator: Number of persons surveyed who did or did not have health insurance coverage at the time of the interview

Denominator: Total number of persons in the survey sample

Indicator Profile Report

Health Insurance Coverage:(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/01/2021

For more information:

NJ State Health Assessment Data, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, nj.gov/health/shad




Personal Doctor or Health Care Provider: Estimated Percent, 2015-2017

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Why Is This Important?

As each new health care need arises, an individual's first point of contact with the health care system is typically his or her personal doctor. In most cases a personal doctor can effectively and efficiently manage a patient's medical care because they understand that person's medical history and social background. Having a regular source of health care is also an indicator of overall access to care.

Risk and Resiliency Factors

Note: [https://www-doh.state.nj.us/doh-shad/query/builder/njbrfs/PriProvider/PriProviderCrude11_.html Custom data views] of self-reported access to a personal doctor or health care provider among New Jersey adults by selected '''sociodemographic and other characteristics''' can be generated using the New Jersey Behavioral Risk Factor Survey interactive query module.

How Are We Doing?

In 2017, 79.2% (crude rate) of New Jerseyans reported having at least one person they think of as their personal doctor or health care provider. Lack of a primary care provider was more common among young adults, especially men aged 18 to 34 (only 59% reported having a personal doctor in 2017).

Healthy People Objective AHS-3:

Increase the proportion of people with a usual primary care provider
U.S. Target: 83.9 percent
State Target: 90 percent


Measure Description for Personal Doctor or Health Care Provider

Definition: Percentage of adults who reported having one or more persons they think of as their personal doctor or health care provider.

Numerator: Number of adults who reported having at least one person they think of as their personal doctor or health care provider.

Denominator: Total number of adults interviewed during the same survey period.

Indicator Profile Report

At Least One Primary Provider(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/13/2019

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: [email protected]




First Trimester Prenatal Care: Percentage of Live Births, 2019

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Why Is This Important?

Women who receive early and consistent prenatal care (PNC) increase their likelihood of giving birth to a healthy child. Health care providers recommend that women begin prenatal care in the first trimester of their pregnancy.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of mothers receiving first trimester prenatal care (PNC) had been about 75% for over a decade before increasing slightly between 2007 and 2014 to 79%. A change in data collection methods in 2014-2015 resulted in a sharp decline such that the rate now stands back at 75%. There is a significant difference in onset of PNC by race/ethnicity with more than 80% of White and Asian mothers receiving early PNC compared to 65% of Hispanic and 61% of Black mothers.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://nj.gov/health/fhs/ Division of Family Health Services] in the New Jersey Department of Health administers programs to enhance the health, safety and well-being of families and communities in New Jersey. Several programs are aimed at improving birth outcomes. The [https://nj.gov/governor/admin/fl/nurturenj.shtml Nurture NJ] campaign focuses on improving collaboration and programming between all departments, agencies, and stakeholders to make New Jersey the safest and most equitable place in the nation to give birth and raise a baby.

Healthy People Objective MICH-10.1:

Prenatal care beginning in first trimester
U.S. Target: 77.9 percent
State Target: 75.7 percent


Note

The calculation of onset of prenatal care (PNC) requires several pieces of information from the birth record. If any of those is missing or invalid, PNC onset cannot be calculated. This problem is particularly high among births to Camden, Hudson, Passaic, and Essex County resident mothers where the proportion of records with unknown PNC onset is above the statewide rate of 2.2%.

Measure Description for First Trimester Prenatal Care

Definition: Number of live births to pregnant women who received prenatal care in the first trimester as a percentage of the total number of live births.

Numerator: Number of live births to pregnant women who received prenatal care in the first trimester

Denominator: Number of live births

Indicator Profile Report

First Trimester Prenatal Care(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/13/2021

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: [email protected]




Cesarean Deliveries among Low Risk Women: Percentage of Low-Risk Births, 2019

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Why Is This Important?

Compared to vaginal deliveries, cesareans carry an increased risk of infection, blood clots, longer recovery, and difficulty with future pregnancies.

How Are We Doing?

The cesarean delivery rate among low risk (NTSV) births declined in 2010 for the first time since the mid-1990s and in 2019 stood at 27%. The rate is slightly higher among Black (31.5%) and Asian (29.5%) mothers than among Hispanic (26.0%) and White (25.6%) mothers.

What Is Being Done?

In 2017, a team composed of DOH staff and external partners collaborated to develop a [http://www.njha.com/njpqc/healthcare-professionals/reducing-ntsv-c-sections/ plan to reduce low risk c-sections] in New Jersey hospitals. In 2018, DOH awarded [https://nj.gov/health/news/2018/approved/20180711a.shtml $4.7 million] to eight agencies to improve health outcomes among infants and mothers in New Jersey, including implementation of a doula pilot program to reduce the likelihood of certain birth and delivery/labor outcomes such as cesarean births. In 2021, the state [https://nj.gov/governor/news/news/562021/approved/20210202b.shtml Medicaid program began covering doula care], while also no longer paying for non-medical early elective deliveries.

Healthy People Objective MICH-7.1:

Reduce cesarean births among low-risk (full-term, singleton, vertex presentation) women: Women with no prior cesarean births
U.S. Target: 23.9 percent
State Target: N/A - NJ objective is for women who have never given birth before. US objective is for women who have never had a c-section before.


Measure Description for Cesarean Deliveries among Low Risk Women

Definition: The low-risk cesarean delivery rate is the percentage of cesarean deliveries among '''n'''ulliparous (first birth), '''t'''erm (37 completed weeks or more, based on the obstetric estimate), '''s'''ingleton (one fetus), '''v'''ertex (head first) births, sometimes referred to as NTSV births.

Numerator: Number of cesarean deliveries among nulliparous, full-term, singleton, vertex presentation (NTSV) births

Denominator: Total number of nulliparous, full-term, singleton, vertex presentation (NTSV) births

Indicator Profile Report

Low-Risk Cesarean Deliveries(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/13/2021

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: [email protected]




Vaginal Birth after Previous Cesarean: Percent of Live Births to Mothers with a Previous Cesarean, 2017-2019

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Why Is This Important?

VBAC is associated with decreased maternal morbidity and a decreased risk of complications in future pregnancies.[https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30681543 ^1^]

How Are We Doing?

The vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC) rate rose rapidly and steadily throughout the early 1990s but peaked in 1996 and began a rapid decline that lasted until 2008. The VBAC rate has been slowly but steadily increasing again since then. VBACs are much more common among residents of Ocean County than elsewhere in New Jersey.

Healthy People Objective MICH-7.2:

Reduce cesarean births among low-risk (full-term, singleton, vertex presentation) women: Prior cesarean birth
U.S. Target: 81.7 percent


Measure Description for Vaginal Birth after Previous Cesarean

Definition: A vaginal delivery by a mother who had a cesarean for one or more previous deliveries.

Numerator: Number of births delivered vaginally after a previous cesarean

Denominator: Total number of live births to mothers who previously had a cesarean

Indicator Profile Report

Vaginal Birth after Previous Cesarean (VBAC)(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

05/26/2021

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: [email protected]




Childhood Lead Testing Coverage: Percent Tested, 2014

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Why Is This Important?

Lead is a heavy metal that has been widely used in industrial processes and consumer products. When absorbed into the human body, lead can have damaging effects on the brain and nervous system, kidneys, and blood cells. Lead exposure is particularly hazardous for pre-school children because their brains and nervous systems are still rapidly developing. Serious potential effects of lead exposure on the nervous system include: learning disabilities, hyperactivity, hearing loss and mental retardation. The primary method for lead to enter the body is through eating or breathing lead-containing substances. Major sources of lead exposure to children are: peeling or deteriorated leaded paint; lead-contaminated dust created by renovation or removal of lead-containing paint; and lead contamination brought home by adults who work in an occupation that involves lead, or who engage in a hobby where lead is used. Lead exposure can also occur through consuming drinking water or food which contains lead.

How Are We Doing?

Exposure to lead is measured by a blood test. New Jersey regulations require health care providers to test for lead exposure among all one- and two-year old children. The percent of children in New Jersey who were tested for lead exposure before 3 years of age increased from 65% for children born in 2000 to almost 75% for children born in 2014. The percentage of children tested for lead exposure before 3 years of age among children born in 2014 was highest in Essex (89.9%), Hunterdon (84.4) and Union (83.6%) Counties. The lowest testing rates were in Sussex (59.9%) and Gloucester (55.3%) Counties.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health (NJ DOH) maintains a Child Health Program, [http://nj.gov/health/childhoodlead/]. This program coordinates a surveillance system that collects information from laboratories regarding the results of blood lead tests performed on children in New Jersey, identifies children with elevated test results, and notifies local health departments regarding children with elevated blood lead tests who reside in their jurisdiction.


Note

Lead poisoning testing counts and testing rates by county include only those children who could be assigned to a county. Among children born in 2014, <4% of children tested could not be assigned to a specific county.

Measure Description for Childhood Lead Testing Coverage

Definition: Percent of New Jersey children tested for lead exposure before 36 months of age

Numerator: Number of children tested for lead exposure before 3 years of age, born in a specified year in a geographic area

Denominator: Number of live births to New Jersey resident mothers in a specified year in a geographic area

Indicator Profile Report

Percent of Children Tested for Lead Poisoning Before 3 Years of Age(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

04/19/2018

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: [email protected], Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Self-Reported Breast Cancer Screening Among Women: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2015-2017

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Why Is This Important?

About one in eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer during their lifetime and this risk increases with age. A mammogram is an X-ray picture of the breast and is the most accurate tool for detecting breast cancer. Health care providers use a mammogram to look for early signs of breast cancer.

Risk and Resiliency Factors

Factors that are negatively associated with self-report of breast cancer screening according to current guidelines include having an '''annual income of less than 139% of poverty level''' and being '''non-Hispanic Asian''' or '''non-Hispanic White'''. ([https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6093265/ Hall et al., 2018]) Note: [https://www-doh.state.nj.us/doh-shad/query/builder/njbrfs/Mammo/MammoAA11_.html Custom data views] of the estimated prevalence of adherence to breast cancer screening guidelines among New Jersey women by selected '''sociodemographic and other characteristics''' (including '''income''' and '''race/ethnicity''') can be generated using the New Jersey Behavioral Risk Factor Survey interactive query module.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of New Jersey women who are current with breast cancer screening recommendations has remained stable for over the last five years at approximately 80%.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Cancer Education and Early Detection (NJCEED) Program provides comprehensive outreach, education and screening services for breast, cervical, colorectal and prostate cancers. The services provided by NJCEED include: *Education *Outreach *Screening *Case Management *Tracking *Follow-up *Facilitation into Treatment

Healthy People Objective C-17:

Increase the proportion of women who receive a breast cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines
U.S. Target: 81.1 percent
State Target: 87.5 percent


Note

Estimates are age-adjusted using the 2000 U.S. standard population. 

Measure Description for Self-Reported Breast Cancer Screening Among Women

Definition: Estimated percentage of New Jersey women aged 50 to 74 years who reported having a mammogram in the last two years.

Numerator: The number of women 50 to 74 years or older who reported having a mammogram in the last two years.

Denominator: The total number of female survey respondents aged 50 to 74 excluding those who responded "don't know" or "refused" to the numerator question.

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Females Aged 50 to 74 Who Reported Having a Mammogram in the Past Two Years(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/11/2017

For more information:

Office of Cancer Control and Prevention, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, web: nj.gov/health/ccp/index.shtml




Self-Reported Cervical Cancer Screening: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2015-2017

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Why Is This Important?

Cervical cancer is one of the most curable cancers if detected early through routine screening. Almost all cases of cervical cancer are caused by infection with high-risk types of the human papillomavirus (HPV). The HPV vaccine protects against the HPV types that most often cause cervical cancer. Women who have had an HPV vaccine still need to have routine Pap smears because the vaccine does not fully protect against all the strains of the virus and other risk factors that can cause cervical cancer. HPV is transmitted through sexual contact. Any woman who is sexually active is at risk for developing cervical cancer. Other risk factors include giving birth to many children, having sexual relations at an early age, having multiple sex partners or partners with many other partners, cigarette smoking, and use of oral contraceptives. The US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends screening for cervical cancer every 3 years with cervical cytology alone in women aged 21 to 29 years. For women aged 30 to 65 years, the USPSTF recommends screening every 3 years with cervical cytology alone, every 5 years with high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) testing alone, or every 5 years with hrHPV testing in combination with cytology (cotesting).

Risk and Resiliency Factors

Factors that are negatively associated with self-report of cervical cancer screening according to current guidelines include having '''less than a high school education''', being a '''US resident for less than 10 years''', and being '''non-Hispanic Asian'''. ([https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6093265/ Hall et al., 2018]) Note: [https://www-doh.state.nj.us/doh-shad/query/builder/njbrfs/PapTest/PapTestAA11_.html Custom data views] of the estimated prevalence of adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines among New Jersey women by selected '''sociodemographic and other characteristics''' (including '''education level''', '''immigration status''', and '''race/ethnicity''') can be generated using the New Jersey Behavioral Risk Factor Survey interactive query module.

How Are We Doing?

In 2017, approximately 82 percent of respondents reported that they had received a Pap test within the past three years.

Healthy People Objective C-15:

Increase the proportion of women who receive a cervical cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines
U.S. Target: 93.0 percent
State Target: 93.6 percent


Note

All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. 

Measure Description for Self-Reported Cervical Cancer Screening

Definition: Estimated percentage of women ages 21-65 years who have had a Pap test in the past three years.

Numerator: The number of women ages 21-65 years who reported having a Pap test in the last three years.

Denominator: The total number of female survey respondents ages 21-65 years excluding those who responded "don't know" or "refused" to the numerator question.

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adult Women Ages 21-65 Years who had a Pap Test Within the Past Three Years(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/13/2018

For more information:

Office of Cancer Control and Prevention, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, web: nj.gov/health/ccp/index.shtml




Self-Reported Colorectal Cancer Screening: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2015-2017

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Why Is This Important?

The fecal occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy are important tools in the detection of various health conditions, especially cancer of the colon and rectum. Colorectal cancer is unfortunately relatively common, does not have symptoms in its early stages, and has a risk that increases with age. Regular colorectal cancer screening is one of the most effective means by which colorectal cancer can be prevented or found early, when treatment is easier. Such screening helps people stay healthy and protects lives. The majority of diagnoses of this type of cancer occur in people who are over the age of 50. As a result, most people are advised to begin receiving these screening tests at age 50. Screening for hidden blood in the stool, using the fecal occult blood test, results in the detection of colorectal cancer at relatively high rates. Additionally, widespread use of this non-invasive, annual test has been shown to decrease both incidence and mortality in randomized controlled trials. By contrast, sigmoidoscopy is a minimally invasive test which uses a tiny video camera to examine the structure of the rectum and the lower part of the colon to find any abnormal areas. A sigmoidoscopy is usually performed only once every 5 years, depending on one's personal risk for colorectal cancer, but is also proven to decrease colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. Although this is a more involved procedure, sigmoidoscopy does have an enhanced ability, when compared to the fecal occult blood test, to find both cancer and colorectal polyps. Polyps are small growths which can over time become cancer, if left in place. Any polyps that are discovered can immediately be extracted through the medical device used for a sigmoidoscopy to prevent possible progression to cancer or to better assess whether or not any cancer is currently present.

Risk and Resiliency Factors

Factors that are negatively associated with self-report of colorectal cancer screening according to current guidelines include having less than a '''high school education''', having an '''annual income''' of less than 139% of poverty level, and being '''non-Hispanic Asian'''. ([https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6093265/ Hall et al., 2018]) Note: [https://www-doh.state.nj.us/doh-shad/query/builder/njbrfs/ColScrPSTF/ColScrPSTFAA11_.html Custom data views] of the estimated prevalence of adherence to colorectal cancer screening guidelines among New Jersey adults by selected '''sociodemographic and other characteristics''' (including '''education''', '''income''', and '''race/ethnicity''') can be generated using the New Jersey Behavioral Risk Factor Survey interactive query module.

How Are We Doing?

In 2017, approximately 67 percent of New Jersey adults aged 50-75 reported being current with colorectal cancer screening recommendations.

What Is Being Done?

A fecal occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy are recommended by the Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan 2008-2012. The Comprehensive Cancer Control Plan 2008-2012 has been developed by the Task Force on Cancer Prevention, Early Detection and Treatment in New Jersey which aims to reduce the incidence, illness, and death due to cancer among New Jersey residents.

Healthy People Objective C-16:

Increase the proportion of adults who receive a colorectal cancer screening based on the most recent guidelines
U.S. Target: 70.5 percent
State Target: 70.2 percent


Note

All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Measure Description for Self-Reported Colorectal Cancer Screening

Definition: Estimated percentage of New Jersey adults ages 50-75 years who are current with colorectal cancer screening recommendations. An individual is considered current if they have had a take-home fecal immunochemical test (FIT) or high-sensitivity fecal occult blood test (FOBT) within the past year, and/or a flexible sigmoidoscopy within the past 5 years with a take-home FIT/FOBT within the past 3 years, and/or a colonoscopy within the past ten years.

Numerator: Number of New Jersey adults aged 50-75 years who reported that they are current with colorectal cancer screening recommendations.

Denominator: The total number of survey respondents aged 50-75 excluding those who answered "don't know" or "refused" to the numerator question.

Indicator Profile Report

Percent of Adults Ages 50-75 who are Current with Colorectal Cancer Screening Recommendations(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/13/2018

For more information:

Office of Cancer Control and Prevention, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, web: nj.gov/health/ccp/index.shtml




Self-Reported Prostate Cancer Screening: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), New Jersey, 2014-2015

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Why Is This Important?

Prostate cancer is the most commonly occurring form of cancer (excluding skin cancer) among men and is the second leading cause of cancer death for men in New Jersey and the U.S. All men over 40 should visit their doctor for a routine health visit which may include a discussion on prostate health.

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, 24% of New Jersey men aged 40 and over reported that a doctor, nurse, or other health professional have talked to them about the advantages and disadvantages of the PSA test.

Healthy People Objective C-19:

Increase the proportion of men who have discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test to screen for prostate cancer with their health care provider
U.S. Target: 15.9 percent
State Target: 24.4 percent


Note

Age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population. 

Measure Description for Self-Reported Prostate Cancer Screening

Definition: The percentage of men aged 40 and above who have discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test to screen for prostate cancer with their health care provider.

Numerator: The number of men aged 40 and above who have discussed the advantages and disadvantages of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test to screen for prostate cancer with their health care provider.

Denominator: The total number of male survey respondents aged 40 or older excluding those who responded "don't know" or "refused" to the numerator question.

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Men Aged 40+ Who Reported a Health Professional Has Talked with them about the Advantages and Disadvantages of the PSA Test(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/11/2017

For more information:

Office of Cancer Control and Prevention, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, web: nj.gov/health/ccp/index.shtml




Self-Reported Cholesterol Screening: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2013-2017 (Odd Years)

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Why Is This Important?

Cholesterol testing is considered a necessary preventive health care measure. High blood cholesterol has been linked to hardening of the arteries, heart disease, as well an increased risk of death from heart attacks.

How Are We Doing?

In 2017, approximately 90% of New Jersey adults have had their blood cholesterol checked by a health professional within the past five years. Whites (88.4%) have a significantly lower prevalence of cholesterol screenings compared to Asians (93%), Blacks (91.3%) and Hispanics (90.7%).

What Is Being Done?

The National Diabetes Education Program has instituted the ABC campaign which promotes the screening for A1c (blood glucose), Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol as monitoring measures to help control diabetes and heart disease. Heart disease is a major complication of diabetes and the Department of Health has suggested that target values for A1c , Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol be established by health providers in partnership with patients based on their individual circumstances.

Healthy People Objective HDS-6:

Increase the proportion of adults who have had their blood cholesterol checked within the preceding 5 years
U.S. Target: 82.1 percent (age-adjusted)
State Target: 86.7 percent (age-adjusted)


Measure Description for Self-Reported Cholesterol Screening

Definition: Proportion of adults aged 18 and older who have had their blood cholesterol checked by a health professional within the past five years.

Numerator: Number of persons aged 18 and over interviewed for this survey who reported that they have had their blood cholesterol level checked in the past five years

Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 and older interviewed during the same survey period

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults Aged 18+ Who Reported Having Their Cholesterol Checked Within the Past Five Years(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/14/2018

For more information:

Community Health and Wellness, Division of Community Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ 08625, Web: https://nj.gov/health/fhs/chronic/




Hemoglobin Screening Among Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2013-2015

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Why Is This Important?

Proper diabetes management requires regular monitoring of blood sugar levels. Glucometers provide immediate feedback on blood sugar levels. An A1C test, however, tells a person what his or her average blood sugar level has been over the past two or three months and is a more reliable indicator of blood sugar control. An A1C level indicates the amount of sugar that is attached to red blood cells (hemoglobin cells). Red blood cells are replaced every two or three months and sugar stays attached to the cells until they die. When levels of blood sugar are high, more sugar is available to attach to red blood cells. For most people with diabetes, the target A1C level is less than 7 percent. Higher levels suggest that a change in therapy may be needed. Therefore, obtaining regular A1C tests plays an important role in diabetes management. The American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes have an A1C test at least two times a year. However, the test should be conducted more often for individuals who are not meeting target blood sugar goals, or who have had a recent change in therapy. (See [http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/27/suppl_1/s15#T7])

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, 63.6% of New Jersey adults with diagnosed diabetes had at least two glycosylated hemoglobin measurement a year. Hispanics have a substantially lower screening rate (55%) compared to Whites (72.5%), Blacks (60.9%), and Asians (75.3%).

What Is Being Done?

The National Diabetes Education Program has instituted the ABC campaign which promotes the screening for A1c (blood glucose), Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol as monitoring measures to help control diabetes and heart disease. The Department of Health has suggested that target values for A1c , Blood Pressure, and Cholesterol be established by health providers in partnership with patients based on their individual circumstances.

Healthy People Objective D-11:

Increase the proportion of adults with diabetes who have a glycosylated hemoglobin measurement at least twice a year
U.S. Target: 71.1 percent (age-adjusted)
State Target: 68.0 percent (age-adjusted)


Note

All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Measure Description for Hemoglobin Screening Among Adults with Diagnosed Diabetes

Definition: Age-adjusted proportion of adults aged 18 years and older with diagnosed diabetes who self-reported having a glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) measurement at least twice a year.

Numerator: Number of persons with diagnosed diabetes interviewed for the survey who reported that they have had at least two A1C measurement in the year prior to being surveyed.

Denominator: Total number of persons with diagnosed diabetes interviewed during the same survey period.

Indicator Profile Report

Glycosylated Hemoglobin Screening Rate among Adults Aged 18+ with Diagnosed Diabetes(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/14/2018

For more information:

Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 364, Trenton NJ 08625-0364, Phone: 609-984-6137, Fax: 609-292-9288, Web: http://www.state.nj.us/health/fhs/diabetes/index.shtml




Dilated Eye Exams Among Persons with Diabetes: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2013-2015

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Why Is This Important?

Individuals with diabetes are at a greater risk for eye related health problems than those without diabetes. A dilated eye exam tests for diabetic retinopathy which is the leading cause of blindness in American adults. Timely treatment and appropriate follow-up care of diabetic retinopathy can reduce the risk of blindness up to 95% according to the National Eye Institute.

How Are We Doing?

In 2015, 58.6% of adults with diagnosed diabetes reported that they had a dilated eye exam within the past year.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Human Services' Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired Diabetic Eye Disease Detection Program provides dilated eye exams for low income individuals who are uninsured or underinsured.

Healthy People Objective D-10:

Increase the proportion of adults with diabetes who have an annual dilated eye examination
U.S. Target: 58.7 percent (age-adjusted)
State Target: 74.6 percent (age-adjusted)

Note

All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Measure Description for Dilated Eye Exams Among Persons with Diabetes

Definition: Percentage of persons aged 18 years and older with diagnosed diabetes who have had a dilated eye exam within the past year.

Numerator: Number of persons aged 18 years and older with diagnosed diabetes interviewed for this survey who reported that they had a dilated eye exam within the past year

Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 years and older with diagnosed diabetes interviewed during the same survey period

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults Aged 18+ with Diagnosed Diabetes Who had a Dilated Eye Exam Within the Past Year(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/14/2018

For more information:

Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, Division of Family Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 364, Trenton NJ 08625-0364, Phone: 609-984-6137, Fax: 609-292-9288, Web: http://www.state.nj.us/health/fhs/diabetes/index.shtml




Seatbelt Usage (Self-Reported): Estimated Percent, 2015-2017

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Motor vehicle crashes are the second leading cause of unintentional injury death in New Jersey and in the United States. Seat belt use can help to prevent injuries and death and the use of seat belts is mandatory in New Jersey.

How Are We Doing?

In 2017, 90% of New Jersey adults reported that they always use a seat belt when driving or riding in a car.

What Is Being Done?

New Jersey's Seat Belt Law (NJS 39:3-76.2f) signed on January 18th, 2010 requires that all vehicle occupants must wear their seat belt regardless of seating position in a vehicle.

Healthy People Objective IVP-15:

Increase use of safety belts
U.S. Target: 92 percent
State Target: 100 percent


Measure Description for Seatbelt Usage (Self-Reported)

Definition: Percentage of New Jersey adults aged 18 and over who who reported wearing a seat belt always in automobiles.

Numerator: Number of persons aged 18 and over who reported wearing a seat belt always in automobiles.

Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 and over in the sample survey

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults who Always Use Seat Belts in Automobiles(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/14/2018

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: [email protected]




Cigarette Smoking Among Adults: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2015-2017

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death, leads to disease and disability, and harms nearly every organ of the body.[https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/index.htm ^1^]

Risk and Resiliency Factors

Note: [https://www-doh.state.nj.us/doh-shad/query/builder/njbrfs/SmokeCurrent/SmokeCurrentAA11_.html Custom data views] of the prevalence of cigarette smoking among New Jersey adults by selected '''sociodemographic and other characteristics''' can be generated using the New Jersey Behavioral Risk Factor Survey interactive query module.

How Are We Doing?

Although New Jersey's smoking rates have decreased since its Master Settlement Agreement-funded programs were initiated, more than one million New Jersey adults continue to smoke. People with fewer years of formal education report higher rates of tobacco use compared to the general population. Comprehensive and free quitting services are needed to help New Jersey smokers quit and ensure a decline in tobacco use rates among all population groups.

What Is Being Done?

The [http://www.nj.gov/health/fhs/tobacco/ Office of Tobacco Control] at the New Jersey Department of Health and its partners use comprehensive programs to prevent the initiation of tobacco use among young people, to help tobacco users quit, to eliminate nonsmokers' exposure to secondhand smoke, and to reduce tobacco-related disparities. These programs include free quitting services, school- and community-based prevention programs and education regarding the [http://www.njleg.state.nj.us/2004/Bills/PL05/383_.HTM New Jersey Smoke-Free Air Act].

Healthy People Objective TU-1.1:

Reduce tobacco use by adults: Cigarette smoking
U.S. Target: 12.0 percent (age-adjusted)
State Target: 12.4 percent (age-adjusted)


Note

All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to the U.S. 2000 standard population.

Measure Description for Cigarette Smoking Among Adults

Definition: Percentage of adults aged 18 years and older who smoke cigarettes every day or some days

Numerator: Number of adults aged 18 years and older who have smoked at least 100 cigarettes in their lifetime and who now report smoking cigarettes every day or some days

Denominator: Number of adults aged 18 years and older

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults who Reported Current Cigarette Smoking(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/15/2018

For more information:

Office of Tobacco Control, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ, 08625, Phone: 609-984-3317, Web: http://www.state.nj.us/health/ctcp/index.shtml




Tobacco Use During Pregnancy: Percentage of Live Births, 2019

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Use of tobacco products during pregnancy is associated with poor birth outcomes.

How Are We Doing?

Tobacco use during pregnancy increases the likelihood of delivering preterm (< 37 weeks gestation) and at low birth weight (< 2500 g). Tobacco use during pregnancy is much more prevalent in southernmost New Jersey than in the rest of the state. It is also much more likely among Black and White women than among Asian and Hispanic women.

What Is Being Done?

[http://momsquit.com/ Mom's Quit Connection] (MQC) helps pregnant and postpartum women as well as their families by providing free, one-on-one counseling for those who want to quit smoking to protect their children from exposure to harmful tobacco smoke. MQC is a program of Family Health Initiatives funded by the NJ Department of Health.

Healthy People Objective MICH-11.3:

Increase abstinence from alcohol, cigarettes, and illicit drugs among pregnant women: Cigarette smoking
U.S. Target: 98.6 percent


Measure Description for Tobacco Use During Pregnancy

Definition: Self-reported use of any tobacco product by the mother during pregnancy

Numerator: Number of live births whose mothers used any tobacco product

Denominator: Total number of live births

Indicator Profile Report

Tobacco Use During Pregnancy(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

05/26/2021

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: [email protected]




Maternal Marital Status: Percentage of Live Births, 2019

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Nonmarital births are at higher risk of having adverse birth outcomes such as low birthweight, preterm birth, and infant mortality than are children born to married women.[https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr48/nvs48_16.pdf ^1^] Children born to single mothers typically have more limited social and financial resources.[https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/misc/wedlock.pdf ^2^]

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of births to unmarried mothers had been steadily increasing for several decades but peaked around 2012 and has been declining since then. The rates among Blacks and Hispanics are more than triple the rate among Whites, and the White rate is about 5 times the rate among Asians. Among those aged 25-34, the proportion of births to unmarried women in 2019 was double the rate in 1990. The share of births to unmarried mothers ranges from 14% in Hunterdon to 63% in Cumberland County.


Note

Hudson and Warren Counties each have a large proportion (> 15%) of records missing mother's marital status, so records with unknown status were removed from the denominator for all counties, NJ, and the US. Interpret with caution.

Measure Description for Maternal Marital Status

Definition: Marital status was determined by response to the following questions on the birth certificate: *For years 1970-1978 - Legitimate? *For years 1979-1988 - Is mother married? *For years after 1988 - Mother married? (At birth, conception, or any time between)

Numerator: Number of live births to unmarried mothers

Denominator: Total number of live births with known marital status

Indicator Profile Report

Births to Unmarried Mothers(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

07/13/2021

For more information:

Center for Health Statistics, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, Web: www.nj.gov/health/chs, e-mail: [email protected]




Immunization - Influenza, Adults: Estimated Percent, 2015-2017

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Recommended immunizations for adults aged 65 years and older include a yearly immunization against influenza (flu) and a one-time immunization against pneumococcal disease. Most of the deaths and serious illnesses caused by influenza and pneumococcal disease occur in older adults and others at increased risk for complications of these diseases because of other risk factors or medical conditions. Barriers to adult immunization include not knowing immunizations are needed, misconceptions about vaccines, and lack of recommendations from health care providers.

How Are We Doing?

In 2017, 63.4% of all New Jersey adults aged 65 and older reported having received the influenza vaccination in the past 12 months. Flu vaccination is lower among Blacks (57.7%)compared to Whites (64.5%) and Hispanics (64.6%).

Healthy People Objective IID-12.7:

Increase the percentage of children and adults who are vaccinated annually against seasonal influenza: Noninstitutionalized adults aged 65 years and older
U.S. Target: 90 percent
State Target: 67.4 percent

Measure Description for Immunization - Influenza, Adults

Definition: Percentage of adults aged 65+ who report receiving an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.

Numerator: Number of survey respondents aged 65+ who report receiving an influenza vaccination in the past 12 months.

Denominator: Number of survey respondents aged 65+.

Indicator Profile Report

Influenza Vaccination in the Past 12 Months, Adults Aged 65+(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/14/2018

For more information:

Vaccine Preventable Disease Program, Communicable Disease Service, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ, 08625, Phone: 609-826-4860, Web: www.nj.gov/health/cd/




Immunizations - Pneumococcal Vaccination: Estimated Percent, 2015-2017

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Recommended immunizations for adults aged 65 years and older include a yearly immunization against influenza (flu) and a one-time immunization against pneumococcal disease. Most of the deaths and serious illnesses caused by influenza and pneumococcal disease occur in older adults and others at increased risk for complications of these diseases because of other risk factors or medical conditions. Barriers to adult immunization include not knowing immunizations are needed, misconceptions about vaccines, and lack of recommendations from health care providers.

How Are We Doing?

In 2017, 71.6% of all New Jersey adults aged 65 and older reported having received the Pneumococcal vaccination in the past 12 months. Pneumococcal vaccination is lower among Hispanics (51.6%) compared to Whites (71.5%) and Blacks (63.6%).

What Is Being Done?

Since 1998, NJDOH has adopted regulations requiring nursing homes to offer pneumococcal and influenza immunizations to all residents, and for hospitals to offer them to seniors who have been admitted for treatment. Education and outreach methods have also been made throughout the state.

Healthy People Objective IID-13.1:

Increase the percentage of adults who are vaccinated against pneumococcal disease: Noninstitutionalized adults aged 65 years and older
U.S. Target: 90 percent
State Target: 72.2 percent

Measure Description for Immunizations - Pneumococcal Vaccination

Definition: Percentage of adults age 65+ who reported ever receiving a pneumococcal vaccination in their lifetime.

Numerator: Number of survey respondents age 65+ who reported ever receiving a pneumococcal vaccine anytime during their life

Denominator: Number of survey respondents age 65+

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults 65+ Who Reported Having Ever Received Pneumococcal Vaccination(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

08/14/2018

For more information:

Vaccine Preventable Disease Program, Communicable Disease Service, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ, 08625, Phone: 609-826-4860, Web: www.nj.gov/health/cd/




Physical Activity-Adult Prevalence: Estimated Percent (Age-adjusted), 2013- 2017 (Odd Years)

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Maintenance of a physically active lifestyle is recognized in public health as one of the essential features of a healthy life. While it has long been known that physical activity can prevent heart disease, newer studies suggest that, on average, physically active persons outlive those who are inactive.

Risk and Resiliency Factors

Note: [https://www-doh.state.nj.us/doh-shad/query/builder/njbrfs/RecPhysicalAct/RecPhysicalActAA11_.html Custom data views] of the prevalence of physical activity among New Jersey adults by selected '''sociodemographic and other characteristics''' can be generated using the New Jersey Behavioral Risk Factor Survey interactive query module.

How Are We Doing?

The percentage of people reporting that they get the recommended level of physical activity in 2017 was about 49%. The 2017 data shows that fewer Hispanics (41%) and Blacks (41%) reported meeting the recommendation compared to Whites (52%) and Asians (57%).

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health coordinates efforts to work with communities to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that address behaviors related to increasing physical activity, breastfeeding initiation and duration, and the consumption of fruits and vegetables, and to decreasing the consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages and high-energy-dense foods, and to decrease television viewing.

Healthy People Objective PA-2.1:

Increase the proportion of adults who engage in aerobic physical activity of at least moderate intensity for at least 150 minutes/week, or 75 minutes/week of vigorous intensity, or an equivalent combination
U.S. Target: 47.9 percent


Note

All prevalence estimates are age-adjusted to U.S. 2000 population (Except for estimates by age group). Physical activity questions are generally asked in odd years only. 

Measure Description for Physical Activity-Adult Prevalence

Definition: Among adults, the proportion who engage in aerobic physical activity of at least moderate intensity for at least 150 minutes/week, or 75 minutes/week of vigorous intensity, or an equivalent combination.

Numerator: Number of adults aged 18 years and older who meet aerobic physical activity recommendations of getting at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity activity, or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity activity, or an equivalent combination of moderate-vigorous intensity activity.

Denominator: Number of surveyed adults aged 18 years and older (excludes unknowns or refusals ).

Indicator Profile Report

Percentage of Adults Aged 18+ Who Meet Aerobic Physical Activity Recommendation(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

10/27/2016

For more information:

Community Health and Wellness, Division of Community Health Services, New Jersey Department of Health, Trenton, NJ 08625, Web: https://nj.gov/health/fhs/chronic/




Population Demographics: Ratio, 2019

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Demographics are an important determinant of health and well-being.


Note

The Gini Index is a summary measure of income inequality. The Gini coefficient incorporates the detailed shares data into a single statistic, which summarizes the dispersion of income across the entire income distribution. The Gini coefficient ranges from 0, indicating perfect equality (where everyone receives an equal share), to 1, perfect inequality (where only one recipient or group of recipients receives all the income). The Gini is based on the difference between the Lorenz curve (the observed cumulative income distribution) and the notion of a perfectly equal income distribution. More information: [https://www.census.gov/topics/income-poverty/income-inequality/about/metrics/gini-index.html]

Measure Description for Population Demographics

Definition: See graph-specific data notes

Numerator: See graph-specific data notes

Denominator: See graph-specific data notes

Indicator Profile Report

Gini Index:(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

09/28/2021

For more information:

NJ State Health Assessment Data, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 360, Trenton, NJ 08625-0360, nj.gov/health/shad




Children Under Five Years of Age Living in Poverty: Estimated Percent, 2015-2019

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Poverty affects a wide range of resources that can enhance or diminish quality of life and thus have a significant influence on health outcomes. These resources include safe and affordable housing, access to education, public safety, availability of healthy foods, local emergency/health services, and environments free of life-threatening toxins.[https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/topics-objectives/topic/social-determinants-of-health ^1^]

How Are We Doing?

Based upon 2019 American Community Survey 5-year estimates from the U.S. Census data, there were wide variations in the county rates of poverty among New Jersey children less than 5 years of age. Counties with the highest percentages of children under 5 years of age living in poverty were Passaic, Atlantic, Salem and Essex Counties. The lowest percentages of poverty among children less than 5 years were in Sussex, Hunterdon and Morris Counties. In New Jersey, approximately a quarter of Black and Hispanic children under 5 years of age are living in poverty. The rates for White and Asian children under age 5 are 7.8% and 4.9%, respectively.


Measure Description for Children Under Five Years of Age Living in Poverty

Definition: Number or percent of children under 5 years of age living in poverty

Numerator: Number of children less than 5 years of age living in poverty in a geographic area

Denominator: Number of children less than 5 years of age living in a geographic area

Indicator Profile Report

Children Under Age 5 Living in Poverty(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

06/22/2021

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: [email protected], Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Risk Factor for Childhood Lead Exposure: Pre-1950 and Pre-1980 Housing: Percent of Pre-1950 Housing Units, as of 2019

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

While all children in New Jersey are at risk of exposure to lead, children who reside in homes build prior to 1950 are at highest risk for elevated blood lead due to the potential presence of leaded paint. In addition, children living in homes constructed prior to 1980 are at risk due to the fact that use of lead-based paint for residential homes was not discontinued until 1980. Major sources of lead exposure to children are: peeling or deteriorated leaded paint; lead-contaminated dust created by renovation or removal of lead-containing paint; and lead contamination brought home by adults who work in an occupation that involves lead, or who engage in a hobby where lead is used. Children are more vulnerable to lead poisoning than adults. The first six years of life are the time when the brain grows the fastest, and when the critical connections in the brain and nervous system that control thought, learning, hearing, movement, behavior and emotions are formed. The normal behavior of very young children (crawling, exploring, teething, and putting objects in their mouth) exposes young children to lead that is present in their environment.

How Are We Doing?

In 2019, New Jersey had approximately 909,000 housing units which were built before 1950. The number of housing units built before 1950 ranged from about 7,000 in Salem County to over 128,000 in Essex County. The percentage of housing units built before 1950 was highest in Essex (40.3%) and Union (39.1%) Counties. Ocean County had the lowest percentage of housing units built before 1950 (7.5%). Also in 2019, New Jersey had approximately 2.4 million housing units which were built before 1980. The number of housing units built before 1980 ranged from approximately 19,000 in Salem County to over 271,000 in Bergen County. The percentage of housing units built before 1980 was highest in Union (81.2%), Passaic (78.9%) and Essex (76.4%) Counties. Somerset County had the lowest percentage of housing units built before 1980 (48.6%).

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) maintains a Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, [http://nj.gov/health/childhoodlead/]. This program has a surveillance system that collects information from laboratories regarding the results of blood lead tests performed on children in New Jersey, identifies children with elevated test results, and notifies local health departments regarding children with elevated blood lead tests who reside in their jurisdiction.


Measure Description for Risk Factor for Childhood Lead Exposure: Pre-1950 and Pre-1980 Housing

Definition: Number or percent of either pre-1950 or pre-1980 housing units

Numerator: Number of residential housing units built prior to 1950 or pre-1980 in a geographic area (based upon 2019 American Community Survey data)

Denominator: Number of residential housing units in a geographic area (based upon 2019 housing unit data from American Community Survey)

Indicator Profile Report

Housing in New Jersey(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

11/02/2020

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: [email protected], Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Children under 3 Years of Age with a Confirmed Elevated Blood Lead Level: Percent with Confirmed Blood Lead >=5 ug/dL, Born in 2014

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Lead is a heavy metal that has been widely used in industrial processes and consumer products. When absorbed into the human body, lead can have damaging effects on the brain and nervous system, kidneys, and blood cells. Lead exposure is particularly hazardous for pre-school children because their brains and nervous systems are still rapidly developing. Serious potential effects of lead exposure on the nervous system include: learning disabilities, hyperactivity, hearing loss, and mental retardation. The primary method for lead to enter the body is through eating or breathing lead-containing substances. Major sources of lead exposure to children are: peeling or deteriorated leaded paint; lead-contaminated dust created by renovation or removal of lead-containing paint; and lead contamination brought home by adults who work in an occupation that involves lead, or who engage in a hobby where lead is used. Lead exposure can also occur through consuming drinking water or food which contains lead.

How Are We Doing?

Exposure to lead is measured by a blood test. New Jersey regulations require health care providers to test for lead exposure among all one- and two-year old children. An elevated blood lead level in children is currently defined in New Jersey as greater than or equal to 5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood (ug/dL). The lowering of the public health intervention level to 5 ug/dL was statutorily required under P.L. 2017, c.7 in February 2017. The NJ DOH's proposed amendments, new rules, and repeals were adopted in August 2017 upon publication in the NJ Register. When we look at children born in 2014 statewide (i.e., the 2014 birth cohort), the percent of tested children who had a confirmed blood lead level greater or equal to 5 ug/dL before 3 years of age was highest in Cumberland, Essex, Mercer, and Passaic Counties. When looking at that same birth cohort of children, the percent of tested children who had a confirmed blood lead level greater or equal to 10 ug/dL before 3 years of age was highest in Cumberland and Essex Counties. The percent of tested children with a confirmed elevated blood lead level greater or equal to 20 ug/dL before 3 years of age was highest in Cumberland, Essex, and Hudson Counties. When we look at children by year of testing, annual statewide blood lead levels in children tested between the years 2000 and 2017 show a decrease in the percentage of children having an elevated blood lead level >=5 ug/dL from a peak of 12% in 2003 to 2.1% in 2017. A similar decreasing trend is seen for children with elevated blood lead levels >=10 ug/dL, from 3.6% in 2000 to 0.5% in 2017. The same decreasing trend can be seen for children with blood lead >=20 ug/dL, from 0.7% in 2000 to 0.1% in 2017.

What Is Being Done?

The New Jersey Department of Health (NJ DOH) maintains a Child Health Program, [http://nj.gov/health/childhoodlead/]. This program coordinates a surveillance system that collects information from laboratories regarding the results of blood lead tests performed on children in New Jersey, identifies children with elevated test results, and notifies local health departments regarding children with elevated blood lead tests who reside in their jurisdiction.


Measure Description for Children under 3 Years of Age with a Confirmed Elevated Blood Lead Level

Definition: Percent of New Jersey children under 3 years of age with confirmed elevated blood lead levels

Numerator: Number of children under 3 years of age with a confirmed elevated blood lead level in a geographic area

Denominator: Number of children under 3 years of age tested for lead exposure in a geographic area

Indicator Profile Report

Percent of Tested Children Under 3 Years of Age(exits this report)

Date Content Last Updated

04/18/2018

For more information:

Environmental Public Health Tracking Project, New Jersey Department of Health, PO Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625-0369, Phone: 609-826-4984, e-mail: [email protected], Web: www.nj.gov/health/epht




Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Self-Reported Presence in Home: Percentage, 2014 - 2016

  • Mercer Compared to State

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Why Is This Important?

Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless and poisonous gas that is produced by the incomplete burning of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels. CO exposure is often the result of improper ventilation or inhalation of exhaust fumes from cars, trucks and other vehicles, generators, or gas heaters. Although CO poisoning can almost always be prevented, every year more than 500 Americans die as a result of unintentional exposure to this toxic gas, and thousands more require medical care for non-fatal poisoning. CO poisoning can be prevented by the installation and maintenance of CO detectors/alarms, and the proper maintenance of heating systems. Important guidelines: -Install battery-operated or battery back-up CO detectors near every sleeping area in your home. -Check CO detectors regularly to be sure they are functioning properly.

How Are We Doing?

In 2016, 86 percent of N.J. residents reported they had a carbon monoxide detector in their home.


Note

Survey question: "A carbon monoxide or CO detector checks the level of carbon monoxide in your home. It is not a smoke detector. Do you have a CO detector in your home: yes; no; don't know/not sure ?"

Measure Description for Carbon Monoxide Detectors: Self-Reported Presence in Home

Definition: Percent of NJ residents who self report having a carbon monoxide (CO) detector in their home.

Numerator: Number of people age 18 years and older reporting having a carbon monoxide (CO) detector in their home.

Denominator: Total number of persons aged 18 and older surveyed using relevant question.

Indicator Profile Report

Sours: https://www-doh.state.nj.us/doh-shad/community/highlight/report/GeoCnty/11.html

Need help enrolling?

Mercer County

LocationPhoneContact Person
FaxActivity Level
Child Care Connection
1001 Spruce Street
Trenton, NJ 08638
Phone: 609-989-7770
Nancy/Colleen Thomson/Gallagher
Fax: 609-737-7625Information Only
East Windsor Twp Health Department
16 Canning Blvd.
East Windsor, NJ 08520
Phone: 609-443-4000
Sue Malec
Fax: 609-443-8303Information Only
Hamilton Township Division of Health
2100 Greenwood Avenue
Hamilton Twp, NJ 08650
Phone: 609-890-3820
Linda Gerasimowicz
Fax: 609-890-6093Information Only
Henry J. Austin Health Center
321 N. Warren Street
Trenton, NJ 08618
Phone: 609-278-6368
Regine Gauthier
Fax: 609-695-3532Personal Assistance
Henry J. Austin Health Center
112 Ewing St
Trenton, NJ 08609
Phone: 609-278-6344
Regine Gauthier
Fax: 609-278-6370 Personal Assistance
Horizon NJ Health
210 Silvia Street
Trenton, NJ 08628
Phone: 800-682-9094 x5418
Luis Cruz
Fax: 609-637-9834Personal Assistance
Lawrence Twp. Health Department
2207 Lawrence Road
Lawrenceville,, NJ 08648
Phone: 609-844-7089
Laurie Wilson, RN
Fax: 609-219-1831Information Only
Mercer County Board of Social Services
200 Woolverton Street, PO Box 1450
Trenton, NJ 08650
Phone: 609-989-4320
NJ FamilyCare Unit
Fax: 609-989-0405Personal Assistance
New Covenant United Methodist Church
1965 South Broad St.
Hamilton, NJ 08610
Phone: 609-393-4725
Heidi Smith
Fax: Personal Assistance
NJ FamilyCare
Hamilton Regional Office
100 American Metro Blvd.
Suite 105
Hamilton, NJ 08619
Phone: 866-411-7782Health Benefits Coordinators
Fax: 609-631-6303Personal Assistance
Planned Parenthood of Mercer
437 East State Street
Trenton, NJ 08608
Phone: 609-599-4411
Beth Dumont
Fax: 609-989-4846Information Only
University Medical Center at Princeton, Out Patient Clinic
252 Witherspoon Street, Suite B
Princeton, NJ 08540
Phone: 609-497-4070
Diane Colachinco
Fax: 609-497-4240Information Only
Princeton Regional Health Commission
PO Box 390
Princeton, NJ 08542
Phone: 609-497-7610
David Henry
Fax: 609-924-7627Information Only
Rise Community Service Partnership
116 N Main St., PO Box 88
Hightstown, NJ 08520
Phone: 609-443-4464
Anna Vazquez
Fax: 609-443-3867 Information Only
Trenton Head Start
222 East State Street, 2nd Floor
Trenton, NJ 08608
Phone: 609-392-2115
Dorita White
Fax: 609-695-0359Information Only
Assemblyman
Wayne P. DeAngelo
4621A Nottingham Way
Hamilton, NJ 08690
Phone: 609-631-7501
Dan Smith
Fax: 609-631-7531Personal Assistance
Sours: https://www.state.nj.us/humanservices/NJFamilyCare/enroll/enroll_merc.html
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Site ID

Health Department

The Hopewell Township Health Department provides state-mandated services and is staffed by State licensed public health professionals. These include a Health Officer, Registered Environmental Health Specialist, Animal Control Officer, Registered Nurse and Registrar of Vital Statistics.

The department provides prevention oriented health services as well as regulatory environmental and communicable disease services in the community. Disease prevention and health promotion can be best advanced through change in lifestyle, fitness activities, nutrition, and health awareness.

Health Education

Various health education programs and videos are available for presentation at club and organization meetings. The Health Department also provides information and referral services for residents with questions about health.

Substance Abuse

The Health Department participates with Hopewell Valley Municipal Drug and Alcohol Alliance. The purpose of the Alliance is to conduct substance abuse awareness education and prevention activities. 

Sours: https://www.hopewelltwp.org/162/Health
Mercer County Promotional Video

COVID-19 Update from Mercer County

Mercer, Penn Princeton Health vaccination partnership

MCP Skating Center

The County of Mercer and Penn Medicine Princeton Health are partnering to expand the availability of COVID-19 vaccination opportunities in Mercer County, announced Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes. Beginning on or about May 8, Princeton Health will manage the second of Mercer County’s fixed-base vaccination sites, located at the lounge at Mercer County Park’s skating center. In addition, Princeton Health will provide staff to operate Mercer County’s new mobile unit, which will schedule community-based vaccination clinics to vaccinate underserved and hard-to-reach populations. The other vaccination clinic, in collaboration with Capital Health, is at CURE Arena in the City of Trenton.

Learn More

Vax-TCHS

Mercer/statewide vaccination update

Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes reports that more than 254,000 COVID-19 vaccine doses have been administered to Mercer County residents, and that as of this morning, April 23, more than 161,000 Mercer residents, or about 55 percent of the County’s adult population, have received at least one vaccine dose. The New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) data dashboard shows that 106,886 Mercer residents have been fully vaccinated. Statewide, more than 3.9 million people have received at least one dose of vaccine and more than 2.6 million people have been fully vaccinated, according to NJDOH. A total of 6,407,175 vaccine doses have been administered to New Jersey residents as of today.

Data Dashboard

Virtual town hall on COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy

The New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) is hosting a free virtual town hall aimed at addressing facts, fears and myths related to the COVID-19 vaccines. “Saving Lives with the COVID-19 Vaccine,” a town hall moderated by Dr. Meg Fisher, special adviser to NJDOH Commissioner Judith Persichilli, and featuring a panel of medical experts will be held from 7 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 27.

Register Here

COVID-19 vaccination eligibility expansion

As of Monday, April 19, COVID-19 vaccine eligibility has been expanded to include everyone age 16 and older who lives, works or studies in New Jersey. At this time, anyone seeking to get a 16- or 17-year-old vaccinated will have to find a site that offers the Pfizer vaccine, which is the only one recommended for individuals younger than 18 years old under the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Emergency Use Authorization.

COVID-19 vaccine locations

Free at-home saliva test for COVID-19

Mercer County Executive Brian M. Hughes has arranged for a free at-home saliva test for COVID-19 in partnership with Vault Health Services. The saliva test is available to County residents 14 years or older and anyone employed as a first responder or health care worker in Mercer County. Details on the at-home testing program, along with a list of COVID-19 testing locations in Mercer County, can be found on the COVID-19 Testingpage on the County website.

Testing Information

How to protect yourself and those around you from COVID-19

HAVE GENERAL QUESTIONS ABOUT COVID-19?

Call (general COVID-19 questions): 2-1-1 (24/7)
Call (medical COVID-19 questions): 1-800-962-1253 (24/7)
Call (vaccine appointment support): 1-855-568-0545 (8a-8p)
Text: NJCOVID to 898-211 to receive alerts
Download COVID Alert NJ app here

COPING WITH STRESS

If you’re feeling stressed, anxious or depressed due to COVID-19, please call New Jersey's Mental Health Hotline at 866-202-HELP (4357) or visit njmentalhealthcares.org for emotional support, guidance, and mental health referrals as needed. You also may contact:
• SAMHSA Disaster Distress Helpline: Call 1-800-985-5990 or text TalkWithUs to 66746 (TTY 1-800-846-8517).
• Crisis Text Line: Text “NJ” to 741741
• Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-572- 7233
• Family Helpline: 1-800-843-5437
• Listing of additional resources.

Heal NJ image

HEAL, NJ Health Care Workers COVID Hope & Healing Helpline, provides live COVID crisis counseling support, 7 days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. to all New Jersey health care workers, their families, and caregivers statewide, with emergency support available 24/7. Call 1-833-416-8733 or visit healhealthcareworkers.com.

Rise image

RISE, NJ First Responders COVID Hope & Healing Helpline, provides live COVID crisis counseling support, 7 days a week from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. to all New Jersey first responders, including police, firefighters, EMS, National Guard, military and veterans, their families, and caregivers statewide, with emergency support available 24/7. Call 1-833-237-4325 or visit risefirstresponders.com.

JOBS AND HIRING

Did you lose your job or have your hours reduced as a result of COVID-19? Find assistance here:
• State of New Jersey resource page at covid19.nj.gov/work
• Listing of employment opportunities at jobs.covid19.nj.gov

BUSINESS ASSISTANCE

For information on COVID-19 and its impact on businesses – including resources, assistance and regulations:
• State of New Jersey business portal at business.nj.gov/covid
• Mercer County Office of Economic Development’s COVID-19 Business Resources

COVID-19 INFORMATION

Sours: https://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/NJMERCER/bulletins/2cea42d

Health nj mercer department county

Health

Mission

The mission of the Ewing Township Health Department is to protect public health, promote individual well-being & prevent diseases.

Essential Services

  • Prevent epidemics and the spread of disease
  • Protect against environmental hazards
  • Prevent injuries
  • Promote and encourage healthy behaviors
  • Respond to disasters and assists communities in recovery
  • Assure the quality and accessibility of health services

The Health Department employs full-time licensed staff that includes: a Health Officer, Registered Environmental Health Specialist, Public Health Field Investigator, two Public Health Nurses, Registrar of Vital Statistics, and an Animal Control Officer. A Health Educator is on staff on a contractual basis.

The goal of the Health Department is to improve the health of the community by providing residents and businesses with programs that include:

Programs and Information for Residents

Services and Information about Animals in the Community

The Ewing Township Animal Control Officer enforces all municipal and state regulations concerning the care and treatment of animals.

Environmental and Consumer Health

The Department works to ensure consumer, environmental, public and occupational health by:

  • conducting annual routine inspections and licensing Ewing businesses
  • investigating environmental health & public health nuisance complaints
  • investigating and resolving  occupational health complaints.

For details see our Environmental and Consumer Health page.

Sours: https://www.ewingnj.org/departments/health
Come Visit Mercer County New Jersey!

 

COVID-19 Information and News

Upcoming Vaccine Clinics

Third Dose COVID-19 Vaccinations for Moderately to Severely Immunocompromised

Everything you need to know about COVID-19 Third Doses and Boosters

COVID-19 Third Dose vs. Booster checklist

Worksite Mini Clinics Available

The COVID-19 Delta variant

 

COVID-19 Cases Reported in West Windsor Residents      1537
                        New Cases Reported in Previous 7 days          14

 Age# of cases
 0 - 21
5 - 184
19 - 559
56 - 750
76+
Unknown
0
0

The COVID-19 case counts reported above are current as of Noon; October 15, 2021.   Please be assured that the Health Department is monitoring for case reports seven days a week and will initiate immediate investigations, inform close contacts, and take recommended public health actions to help prevent further spread of illness in the community.  Individuals are cleared from isolation once their symptoms resolve and they are at least 10 days beyond the date of symptom onset and 24 hours fever-free and symptoms have improved.  The first case of COVID-19 in a West Windsor resident was reported on March 26, 2020. 

People infected with COVID-19 experience a range of symptoms from mild to severe and some are even asymptomatic.  COVID-19 symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days following exposure.   A quarantine of 14 day remains the preferred time frame.  Even though a person is asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic, they may still be capable of transmitting the virus to others. Please cooperate with public health officials in contact tracing efforts and help stop the spread of disease in our community.   If you are not vaccinated, please consider taking this step to protect yourself, your family and your community.

The Health Department continues to offer vaccination clinics for those eligible to receive a dose.  Some people who received the primary series of Pfizer are now eligible for booster doses if their second dose was at least 6 months ago and they fall within the qualified groups.  Eligibility for younger children and booster for certain groups for Moderna and J&J may expand over the next two week.  Please watch for updates.  Vaccination opportunities hosted by the Health Department will be posted to the Township website at: westwindsornj.org

Hospitalizations Reported September 14, 2021 – October 14, 2021       1

The COVID-19 Activity Level Index (CALI) for Week ending October 9, 2021 for Mercer County is MODERATE. *

*Note: Public health guidance and recommendations for cases/contacts associated with the West Windsor Plainsboro School District will be based on a HIGH CALI. 

 

Important Links

CDC COVID-19

Details
Sours: https://www.westwindsornj.org/covid-19

You will also like:

Back to the List of CountiesList of Registrars for Mercer CountyEast Windsor Township
Mary Anne Brown
East Windsor Health Dept.
16 Lanning Boulevard
East Windsor, NJ 08520
Phone:
Fax:
 Ewing Township
Rachel L. Evans
Municipal Building
2 Jake Garzio Drive
Ewing, NJ 08628
Phone: (609) 883-2900 x7692
Fax: (609) 771-0480
 Hamilton Township
Sarah Papadem
PO Box 00150
2100 Greenwood Avenue
Hamilton Twsp Health Dept.
Hamilton, NJ 08609
Phone: (609) 890-3826
Fax: (609) 890-6093
 Hightstown Borough
Debra L. Sopronyi
Municipal Building
156 Bank Street
Hightstown, NJ 08520
Phone: (609) 490-5100
Fax: (609) 371-0267
 Hopewell Borough
Michele Hovan
88 East Broad Street
Hopewell, NJ 08525
Phone: (609) 466-2636 x13
Fax: (609) 466-8511
 Hopewell Township
Evelyn S. Estrada
Municipal Building
201 Washington Crossing-
Pennington Road
Titusville, NJ 08560-1410
Phone: 609-737-0120
Fax:
 Lawrence Township
Linda Ciosek
2207 Lawrenceville Road
P.O. Box 6006
Lawrenceville, NJ 08648
Phone: (609) 844-7089
Fax: (609) 896-0412
 Pennington Borough
Elizabeth Sterling
30 North Main Street
Pennington, NJ 08534
Phone: (609) 737-0276
Fax: (609) 737-9780
 Princeton
Lauralyn Bowen
1 Monument Drive
Princeton, NJ 08540-
Phone: (609) 497-7608
Fax: (609) 924-7627
 Robbinsville Township
Michele Seigfried
2298 Route 33
Robbinsville, NJ 08691
Phone: (609) 259-3600
Fax: (609) 259-3645
 Trenton City
Maricarmen Barrientos
City Hall
319 E. State St.
1st Floor
Trenton, NJ 08608
Phone: 609-989-3241
Fax:
 West Windsor Township
Deonna Amos-Whitfield
271 Clarksville Road
PO Box 38
West Windsor, NJ 08550
Phone: (609) 936-8400 x250
Fax: (609) 799-2136
 
Sours: https://www.nj.gov/cgi-bin/dhss/vital/registrars.pl?county=Mercer


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