C3 corvette body mount replacement

C3 corvette body mount replacement DEFAULT

 Rear Body mounts (1/10)
 7/15/07 8:51am

fedexbicman76
Former Member

Send Private Message

HARROD, OH - USA

Vette(s):
1976 - L-48 Auto, A/C, AM/FM, Power Windows, Tilt Telescopic Wheel, Factory Aluminum Wheels, Inferno Red Matalic Custom paint with Black Leather Interior.


Joined: 7/25/2003
Posts: 335

Got some aggravating news yesterday after starting what I thought was going to be some finish paint work. I was in the rear wheel wells getting ready to put some paint on and after pressure washing the wells I noticed the rear body mount on the drivers side looked a bit funny. I started picking at it and it looks like one of the P.Owners tried to patch a rusted body mount with a cheap fiberglass putty or something.    I didn't pick hard but, the crap just started flaking off what was left of a rusted body mount. So, I looked at the other side and sure enough it was the same kind of thing.
My question is this...Can the rear body mounts be replaced with out taking the body completely off the frame?
Signed "Completely Frustrated"

Our Sponsors help support C3VR

 Rear Body mounts (2/10)
 7/15/07 12:12pm

Adams' AppleLifetime Member
Lifetime Member
Moderator
Send Private Message

Duncanville, TX - USA

Vette(s):
#1-1974 L-48 4spd Cp Med Red Metallic/Black deluxe int w/AC/tilt/tele./p/w-p/b/ Am-Fm/map light National/Regional/Chapter NCRS "Top Flight" #2-1985 Bright Red/Carmine Cp.L-98/auto Member: NCRS, NCRS Texas, Corvette Legends of Texas


Joined: 11/8/2003
Posts: 19863

The cushionscan be replaced by loosening allof the mounts, and carefully raising that side of the body up a bit.
If the cage(body), or stand-off(frame) is the part that's rusted, those need to be welded on the frame, and riveted on the body

______________
Joel Adams
C3VR Lifetime Member #56    
My Link


(click for Texas-sized view!)             NCRS

"Money can't buy happiness -- but somehow it's more comforting to cry in a CORVETTE than in a Kia"

 Rear Body mounts (3/10)
 7/15/07 4:17pm

fedexbicman76
Former Member

Send Private Message

HARROD, OH - USA

Vette(s):
1976 - L-48 Auto, A/C, AM/FM, Power Windows, Tilt Telescopic Wheel, Factory Aluminum Wheels, Inferno Red Matalic Custom paint with Black Leather Interior.


Joined: 7/25/2003
Posts: 335

Thanks Joel for the reply Joel. The number 4 mounts (the ones above and behind the rear tires) are rusted through on two of the sides on the drivers side and on the passenger side. I will replace the rubber cushions as well. Man, just when I thought I had most of the tough stuff done.

 Rear Body mounts (4/10)
 7/16/07 9:48am

I started there and ended up with pulling the body off to fix the rest of the mounts that were just as bad. Not trying to scare you but if you plan for the worst and if it ends up better you will be happier. Either way, it isn't that bad of a job. http://hometown.aol.com/bmclau5079/page5.html

______________

Brian - NCM Lifetime Member

73 coupe L48, Flat-top pistons, Performer RPM Heads, Crane Cam and roller rockers, Holley 650 vac sec. Performer intake,
3.55 gear BTO 200-4R trans,
Leather seats, F-body seatbelts, Pioneer CD player
Magnaflow Exhuast System

Dewitt radiator and dual electric fans

Borgeson Steering box

 



 Rear Body mounts (5/10)
 7/16/07 11:58am

lukesvetteLifetime Member
Lifetime Member
Send Private Message

HOWELL, NJ - USA

Vette(s):
1979, Targa Blue (72 Color), Pace Car rear spoiler, L88 hood, Dark blue factory interior, 525HP 406, HD 700R4, 370 gears,Steeroids, composite rear spring, TT IIs wrapped in T/A Radials.


Joined: 5/18/2004
Posts: 6810

Excellent guide for the body lift Brian! I'll definitely mark this one!!Thumbs%20Up

 Rear Body mounts (6/10)
 7/16/07 11:08pm

fedexbicman76
Former Member

Send Private Message

HARROD, OH - USA

Vette(s):
1976 - L-48 Auto, A/C, AM/FM, Power Windows, Tilt Telescopic Wheel, Factory Aluminum Wheels, Inferno Red Matalic Custom paint with Black Leather Interior.


Joined: 7/25/2003
Posts: 335

Thanks for the vote of encouragement and the lift guide Brian. I am looking into some help on this one. May have found a local person to help.

 Rear Body mounts (7/10)
 8/2/07 2:21am

79rebuild
Former Member

Send Private Message

Yelm, WA - USA

Vette(s):
1979 L82 4 speed Scat 383 crank 190 cc Procomp Aluminum Heads 202 160 stainless valves GM Powder metal rods Speedpro H860CP Hypereutectic pistons 280 cam hydralic HEI Pro comp 1.6 roller rockers Mighty Demon 750 Sanderson CC1AP Hedders.


Joined: 7/12/2007
Posts: 356

I'm lifting the body on 79 right now. I should say I made an attempt at it tonight. Thought I had everything until I realized I forgot the rear bumper Ouch duh! I printed out redwingvette's checklist and missed step one on the copy paste. My body mount bolts were real bad up in the front rockers and the frame has a thick coating of road grime/grease . 

The lifting harness I bought from corvette America is nice but it's really long as I'm using my shop crane to lift it.

I definately could have gotten away with using the 5000 lb cargo straps I had acquired from work in place of the lift harness. Whenever my new camera I ordered from amazon arrives I can post pictures.

 Rear Body mounts (8/10)
 8/2/07 9:31pm

fedexbicman76
Former Member

Send Private Message

HARROD, OH - USA

Vette(s):
1976 - L-48 Auto, A/C, AM/FM, Power Windows, Tilt Telescopic Wheel, Factory Aluminum Wheels, Inferno Red Matalic Custom paint with Black Leather Interior.


Joined: 7/25/2003
Posts: 335

Sounds good. I would like to see the photos of the lift. Thanks and hope the next attempt goes better.

 Rear Body mounts (9/10)
 8/4/07 2:20am

79rebuild
Former Member

Send Private Message

Yelm, WA - USA

Vette(s):
1979 L82 4 speed Scat 383 crank 190 cc Procomp Aluminum Heads 202 160 stainless valves GM Powder metal rods Speedpro H860CP Hypereutectic pistons 280 cam hydralic HEI Pro comp 1.6 roller rockers Mighty Demon 750 Sanderson CC1AP Hedders.


Joined: 7/12/2007
Posts: 356

Well I gave up on using the shop crane. You could definately get the body up high enought to change out the mounts using it. And don't buy the body lift harness it's a waste of money. I ended up getting a chain hoist from harbor freight and from 9' I still had to wrap the body harness 3x around 2x4's to get the body high enough to clear the gas tank. That thing is way too long. You could easilly use some ratchet straps and do a much better job. What was odd is that the only rust I have on the frame is at every body mount point. Two of them had to be drilled out they were rusted so bad. One was almost completely rusted through the bolt and the rest of them weren't much better.

 Rear Body mounts (10/10)
 8/5/07 9:12am

fedexbicman76
Former Member

Send Private Message

HARROD, OH - USA

Vette(s):
1976 - L-48 Auto, A/C, AM/FM, Power Windows, Tilt Telescopic Wheel, Factory Aluminum Wheels, Inferno Red Matalic Custom paint with Black Leather Interior.


Joined: 7/25/2003
Posts: 335

Jason, thanks for the tip on the body harness. Sounds like I may be in for more work than I was thinking originally then too. I will find out when we get the body lifted on my mine. Glad you were able to get yours lifted and taken care of. Let's hope everything else goes easier from here on out now.

Our Sponsors help support C3VR

Sours: /vrforums/

Copy Rights and Trademarks Disclaimer: The Corvette name is a copyrighted trademark / sales mark of the Chevrolet Motors Division of General Motors. Any use of the Corvette name at this site is used only as a point of reference to their automobiles or automotive products line of the same name. No copyright / trademark / sales mark infringements are intended or implied. This web site is independently operated as a free informational service for the benefit of Corvette Owners and other interested parties. Neither the Chevrolet Motor Division nor any other segment of General Motors or its affiliates or subsidiaries shall bear any responsibility whatsoever for its content.

CorvetteC3.com Privacy Policy: Some or all of our partners, affiliates, advertisers and other associates may collect, serve and/or use computer cookies to enhance user experiences. Cookies are generally not considered "problematic" or harmful. However, please be advised that "cookies and IP related information" are being collected, tracked and used while visiting and using our website. By using and visiting www.corvettec3.com, you agree to be bound by the terms contained herein. Clearing Web Browser Cookies. We use third-party advertising companies to serve ads when you visit our website. These companies may use information (not including your name, address, email address, or telephone number) about your visits to this and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. If you would like more information about this practice and to know your choices about not having this information used by these companies, click here.

  • Google, as a third party vendor, uses cookies to serve ads on this site.
  • Google's use of the DART cookie enables it to serve ads to our users based on their visit to this site and other sites on the Internet.
  • Users may opt out of the use of the DART cookie by visiting the Google ad and content network privacy policy.
Sours: http://www.corvettec3.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1117461748
  1. What happened in palmdale today
  2. Andi mack episodes season 1
  3. Le specs crazy in love
  4. 2006 gmc sierra denali grill
  5. Rick and morty guitar picks

Copy Rights and Trademarks Disclaimer: The Corvette name is a copyrighted trademark / sales mark of the Chevrolet Motors Division of General Motors. Any use of the Corvette name at this site is used only as a point of reference to their automobiles or automotive products line of the same name. No copyright / trademark / sales mark infringements are intended or implied. This web site is independently operated as a free informational service for the benefit of Corvette Owners and other interested parties. Neither the Chevrolet Motor Division nor any other segment of General Motors or its affiliates or subsidiaries shall bear any responsibility whatsoever for its content.

CorvetteC3.com Privacy Policy: Some or all of our partners, affiliates, advertisers and other associates may collect, serve and/or use computer cookies to enhance user experiences. Cookies are generally not considered "problematic" or harmful. However, please be advised that "cookies and IP related information" are being collected, tracked and used while visiting and using our website. By using and visiting www.corvettec3.com, you agree to be bound by the terms contained herein. Clearing Web Browser Cookies. We use third-party advertising companies to serve ads when you visit our website. These companies may use information (not including your name, address, email address, or telephone number) about your visits to this and other websites in order to provide advertisements about goods and services of interest to you. If you would like more information about this practice and to know your choices about not having this information used by these companies, click here.

  • Google, as a third party vendor, uses cookies to serve ads on this site.
  • Google's use of the DART cookie enables it to serve ads to our users based on their visit to this site and other sites on the Internet.
  • Users may opt out of the use of the DART cookie by visiting the Google ad and content network privacy policy.
Sours: http://corvettec3.com/cgi-bin/yabb2/YaBB.pl?num=1058016907/10
1979 corvette body mounts location part 3

Whether you are doing a frame off or partially restoring a Shark, the body mounts should be replaced. All rubber products degrade as they age, dry out, and crack. Moisture causes corrosion, eventually tearing the rubber apart as the body mount steel reinforcement sleeves grow larger. Deteriorated body mounts affect door alignment and will eventually this will cause stress cracks and deformed body panels.

Replacing body mounts is not fun, but with patience and finesse even stubborn corroded bolts can be loosened. Body mount bolts are corroded by a slurry of dirt and water. In the northern climates, salt makes removal even more difficult. It’s often a surprise to find Florida-based Shark, relocated beach cars, and displaced Canadian Corvettes with severe corrosion.

We are working on a Corvette that spent its early life in Canada. It doesn’t show many ill effects from the short time it was there, at least not until we decide to replace the body mounts.

Since the rear mounts exhibit torn rubber, we want to make sure the body panels aren’t under stress before painting the exterior. We can reposition the door hinges to make up for body mount sag if there is enough adjustment available. Of course, the door hinge pins wear and sag but the body pillar needs to be in the correct place for proper alignment.

Severe corrosion is confined to the driver’s side so we have no intentions of removing the body. We will be extra careful not to damage the frame mounted cage nuts during disassembly.

Once the bolts start breaking, there’s no turning back. It’s best to avoid breaking bolts, but if they’re breaking easily then the frame is probably in rough shape. Now’s the time to determine if body mount replacement is possible without total body removal. Look at all the body mounting pads on the frame for severe corrosion. If you find heavy scale and deep red rust streaming off the mounting pads, body removal may be necessary. Extensive frame repair may be necessary, requiring welding and fitting of many pieces.

To minimize damage, don’t attempt to finish this job in one weekend. Soak all body mount bolts for a week or more in PB Blaster or a similar product before attempting to remove the first bolt. Once the exterior pieces are out of the way, soak all bolts and nuts again. If you get all bolts loose in one weekend that’s a great start.

Our 1979 Corvette is slated for a complete paint job so we remove the front and rear bumpers first. Changing body mounts on 1974-1982 Corvettes without removing the bumpers is difficult, but not impossible. Urethane bumpers have enough flex to allow raising the body enough to just get mounts in and out.

Fiberglass bumper retrofitted Sharks are a little tighter and can be damaged if the body is lifted high enough to get the mounts out. We usually remove the fiberglass rear bumper while leaving the front bumper in place. This allows just enough working room. We lift at the rear of the body on the C-channel to access the mounts.

Chrome bumper Sharks require rear bumper and bracket removal plus removal of the front bumper brackets from the frame bolts. The front bumper can stay in place as long as the brackets are not bolted to the frame. All Sharks require core support mounting bolt removal and steering column disconnection. The steering column can be disconnected at the coupler (rag joint). Be sure to watch the positioning of the coupler when the body is set back in place.

Record the amount of shims and their placement during removal for ease of reassembly. Once the new mounts are in place with new shims, most doors are back in alignment where they need to be. We check the shim placement if the doors don’t align, then adjust the number of shims accordingly at the number two post mount to raise or lower the front of the door. Once door position is established, the other mounting areas are raised or lowered for correct seam fit. It takes some practice to install shims correctly. Always have the car on level ground with the wheels loaded; never check door fit with the car on jack stands or a lift.

001
As you can see, the 35 year-old body mounts are cracked and dry rotted. Soak the body mount bolts for a few days at least…the longer, the better. We use PB Blaster to douse the bolts because it has capillary action which draws the penetrant into the bolt and nut threads.

002
The rear speaker or filler panels cover up the rear body mount caged nuts. In a perfect world, the speakers could stay in place, but the caged nuts always spin inside the cage. Plus, you need to apply the penetrant from the top to let it work into the threads.

003
This is what we found when we removed the speakers. From the look of the bolt threads, we won’t be unscrewing that bolt. We gave it a healthy dose of penetrant anyway. The nut has a cage like the rest of the body mount nuts, except this one is riveted to the fiberglass floor pan. A small amount of force is capable of ripping the cage loose. Plus, most of the cages are rotted badly so they tear apart. We usually can grab the nut during disassembly with a crescent wrench unless it’s badly seized.

004
The wheel well cover plate in the front of the rear tires must be removed. The body mount bolts sit in the recess and can be difficult to grasp. If the wrench slips, the fiberglass can be damaged. When the cover is replaced, be sure to apply strip caulk to seal the panel or the body mount bolt will begin corroding.

005
You must remove many goodies to access the body mounts. The lower valance panel screws were replaced with Allen head screws in place of Phillips. The lower valance screws were difficult to remove due to corrosion, so we applied PB Blaster to the threads by spraying between the valance panel and frame.

006
This is an important ground strap that should be removed to prevent stretching during mount replacement. The strap supplies a ground to the instrument cluster and interior compartment. Be sure to reinstall it with clean hardware. The opening between frame and lower valance will be covered with splash shields we removed earlier.

007
The core support bolts must be removed no matter the Shark year. In many cases, the core support brackets have shims. Make sure to record their position and reinstall them. The core support keeps fenders in position and must be shimmed high enough to keep a correct door-to-fender gap.

008
We are finally ready to remove the position two body mount bolt from the kick panel area. This is the passenger side position two-bolt and it came out easily using the air impact wrench. Impact wrenches can be very helpful because of their hammering action as long as you slowly apply force; don’t start by holding the trigger wide open. The slow hammering action loosens the corrosion from the threads.

009
There is no particular sequence to bolt removal; however, we usually do interior bolts first so we don’t have to open the doors once we have supported the body for mount replacement. This is the number three body mount bolt on the passenger side, which also came out easily. When you have the socket on the body mount bolt, apply steady pressure before putting a lot of force on the ratchet. If the bolt has slack before a high load is applied, the caged nuts may slip.

010
Now we move to the driver’s side. The number one body mount nut and bolt will not loosen no matter how long we soak it. This is a precursor of more difficult things to become. Applying heat with an acetylene torch isn’t my favorite way to get things loose but it’s effective. We apply heat to the nut (no bolts were harmed in this photo). Beware torch placement! There is a fuel vapor canister above the frame rail near the mount, which is just one of many pieces that could cause big trouble if direct flame touches them.

011
The number three body mount bolt is seized to the caged nut, causing it to spin in the cage. We modify a piece of steel then force it into the frame mount and caged nut to securely grab the nut. It works and we are able to remove the bolt with careful, smooth applications of force on the ratchet wrench.

012
This is our very effective caveman-style wedge made from a piece of 5/8” rebar approximately 14 inches long with two flat ends ground at the tip. The cages used on the frame mounts are heavy gauge steel so the wedge must be stout enough to apply great force.

013
After sitting for days, the number four body mount bolt cannot be removed, even after applying moderate heat to the nut. We don’t want to bring the acetylene torch in the car so we opt to cut the bolt with a sawzall. Peculiarly, every bolt on the driver’s side was difficult to remove while the passenger side bolts came out with minimal effort. Was it due to the early years spent in Canadian winters?

014
Once we have our number four-bolt cut out, heat is applied to the caged square nut so the remaining bolt can be twisted out. We clean the threads with a 7/16-14 thread tap and reuse the nut.

015
With the Corvette on a lift, we install the new mount. The body is evenly raised by a screw jack placed on the C-channel near the rear of the channel. Be sure the body is secure before putting your hands in harm’s way.

016
The supplied bolts are ready to go in. We coat all the body mount hardware and sleeves with zinc-chromate primer to prevent corrosion, at least for a few years. We also coat the new rubber mounts with silicone inside and out to keep them from drying out prematurely. This is not “factory correct” but why allow corrosion to start when we can control it now?

017
Here is a trick we found that works well. Once the body mounts are in place, we tap all threads in the frame’s caged nuts. We tape the 12 point socket to the tap to keep from dropping it into the frame, and use our ¼” air ratchet to run the tap in and out. Go slow and back the tap out frequently or you may break the tap off in the caged nut. The only way to proceed then is to raise the body enough to access the tap and remove it.

018
Once all the body mounts are in place, a ½” diameter bar is placed in the frame rail through the hole in the C-channel on each side of the body. When the line-up bar goes straight through both holes, the body is aligned to the frame.

Resources:

Story and photos courtesy Chris Petris

Sours: https://tech.corvettecentral.com/2016/01/shark-body-mount-installation/

Replacement mount corvette c3 body

Body Mount #4 Repair Pocket

Description

When the #4 steel mount on Convertibles sometimes deteriorates
it eats up the fiberglass. This is a fiberglass pocket to install in its place.

Dynamic Corvettes

Located in Saginaw Michigan since 1983, we are family owned and operated specializing in only Corvettes

Our fiberglass parts are manufactured in house and only sold by us

All parts are made of high quality Vinyl Ester Resin and Chop Strand Mat and come out of the mold with a Class A finish

We go to great lengths to build a high quality part. We test fit to a minimum of 3 never wrecked Corvettes then we take the average of the 3 to tool from.

 It is imperative to remember we are working with 40 plus year old vehicles and back then the GM quality specs varied greatly to today’s standards. 

Better to purchase one of our parts or else with our competitors you will have to bodywork everything. 

You will not be able to scuff and paint. Test fitting is required prior to bodywork as well as throughout the bodywork process. 

The likelihood of having to bodywork adjacent panels for the proper fit is very high and it is recommended a qualified Corvette Specialist install these parts.

Returned parts are subject to a 25% restocking fee plus return freight. Altered parts are non-returnable.

Additional information

Year

1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1982

Sours: https://dynamiccorvettes.com/product/c3-body-mount-4-repair-pocket/
C3 Corvette Frame Repair

Chevrolet Corvette Body Mount Cushion Replacement - Sermon On The Mounts

Sooner Or Later, A Shark's Body Mount Cushions Will Need To Be Replaced. Here's One Way To Do The Deed

It's not a question of "if" but "when." The factory-installed rubber body mounts (pads or cushions, depending on the year) on any Solid-Axle, Mid-Year, or Shark that has seen even moderate road time over the years will need replacing. The original components deteriorate from exposure to the elements, dirt, grime, grease, and oil. The old rubber will get hard and brittle, crack, and break apart. When that happens, the creaks and groans factor increases exponentially-and on '63-82s, where biscuit-like cushions are used, a collapsed cushion could, in extreme cases, cause the body to droop or sag enough to cause more than the normal stress cracking of the fiberglass body panels.

Mid-Years and Sharks, which employ very similar body-to-frame mounting arrangements on their essentially identical frame (with the major exception of the ends of the frames, for the body designs and various bumper mounting systems), use eight sets (two pieces per set, an upper and a lower) of cushions, four per side, to affix the body shell to the frame. Working from back to front, the first set (No. 4) is accessible from the fenderwell, just behind the rear tire. The second set (No. 3) is accessed through a small screw-on panel in the forward portion of the rear fenderwell. The third and fourth (Nos. 2 and 1) sets are both in the cowl area, and there is no direct body-to-frame support or attachment forward of the firewall-the entire nose section, including the hood and pop-up headlight assemblies, is suspended by where it's glued in place around the cowl.

The rear-most sets are the only ones that are even marginally visible. To check the condition of one of the rear sets, you really need to remove the tire and wheel, but with the rim and rubber out of the way, it (the cushion set) is hanging right out there in plain sight. And you can figure that if it shows cracks and splits or other signs of deterioration (and it will), it's time to change all eight of 'em. You may as well do the job right.

We're not talking about a high dollar expenditure here. A stock-replacement-style rubber single cushion set sells for around $18. If you buy a complete kit, the eight sets of cushions, and new body mount bolts, nuts, washers, and shims, plus a pair of new body mount access covers (they go, one per side, in the forward portion of the rear wheel well), the total expenditure will be under $200. Our point is, don't scrimp on it. All of the components are readily available. For those who are planning on keeping their Shark for more than a few years and are aiming for an NCRS/Bloomington Gold sort of restoration, polyurethane bushing sets are available-for a lower price than the rubber repops-and the poly pieces should last for the life of the car.

Unless your Shark is from one of the dry southwest (desert) regions of the U.S., the original nuts and bolts will probably be thoroughly rusted in place and together, so plan on soaking all of them regularly, starting a week or so before the work is to be done, with some sort of rust dissolving/penetrating material or lubricant (WD-40, RustBuster, etc.). It'll make the job less difficult and less unpleasant. You can make the chore easier if you remove the seats, carpeting, carpet underlayment, left and right kick panels, and the ducting from behind the kick panels. If the carpet in the Shark is worn, or you've been thinking about adding a heat barrier kit to hold the interior temperature down to a light roast, this is the perfect time to do so.

Our subject car is an L82/four-speed '77 owned by Scott Norseth. This particular Corvette spent its first few years in New York before being relocated to the dryer climes of the left coast and sunny Southern California. That brief exposure to salted roads was just enough to cause corrosion on the body mounting hardware but, fortunately, not enough to cause a rusted frame, which is not an uncommon malady on vintage snowbelt Vettes.

Scott ordered a set of polyurethane body mounts (PN 183062), a '73-82 Body Mount Hardware kit (PN 183075, includes all necessary nuts and bolts, washers, and shims), and a set of rear wheelwell access covers (PN 182110) from Corvette Central. While this is a job that can be done at home, it's one that's a lot easier to accomplish when you have a hoist and a good selection of pneumatic tools available, so Scott made arrangements to have Auto Perfections install the new mounts. There's a hoary clich (is there any other kind?) that says time is money-and it is true. If you have the time available to do some of the prep work yourself, you can and will save money on having a pro do the job. And most shops charge the same flat rate for a helper to pull the seats and carpeting out as they do for a skilled technician to perform the work that requires expertise. So, about a week before the '77 was scheduled in at Auto Perfections, Scott gutted the interior and began giving each nut and bolt a daily soaking with an aerosol rust penetrating fluid.

Before going any further, we want to emphasize that what we're showing is one specific shop's way of performing this operation. There are undoubtedly myriad other ways-some better, some worse-than what is demonstrated here. But, for a non-concours original, a driver if you will, this approach does work. Something else to bear in mind if you're questioning how Auto Perfections did the job...this isn't a general repair shop. The proprietor, Loy McKenrick, has owned several Corvettes and is the two-decade-plus owner of the "Size Matters" '72 that we've used in numerous articles, lead technician Kevin Walker's daily driver is a late '80s C4, and the shop regularly has several Corvettes of varying vintages in for body repairs, refinishing, or mechanical services.

With that said, let's cut to the chase and see what's involved in replacing the body mount cushions on a third-gen. Corvette.

MotorTrend LogoTHE LATEST IN CAR NEWS

EMAIL NEWSLETTER SIGN-UP!

Share on FacebookShare on Twitter

Sours: https://www.motortrend.com/how-to/vemp-0112-chevrolet-corvette-body-mount-cushion-replacement/

You will also like:

It was quiet around, only chapping sounds, my groaning and rapid breathing of a young active male, which forced my mouth, could be heard. Then he thrust the penis over the full length and pulled up, and at me with this a little eyes from the orbits did not. Fly out. It was hard for me to breathe.



418 419 420 421 422