2020 subaru outback 6 cylinder

2020 subaru outback 6 cylinder DEFAULT

New Subaru Outback XT L Turbo Vs. Discontinued L Engine

When Subaru announced the six-cylinder liter Boxer in the Outback was going away, many fans were disappointed. But turbo power is back for the SUV. Powering the Outback is a newly-available turbocharged liter Boxer. It’s sourced from the Ascent family hauler.

The all-new Outback XT comes in Onyx Edition XT, Limited XT, and Touring XT models and they are powered by the brand’s all-new direct-injected turbocharged liter Boxer 4-cylinder that beats the current Outback R engine’s power specs. The R develops horsepower and lb. ft of torque. The new XT turbocharged liter Boxer produces horsepower and lb.-ft. of torque.

More power at lower RPMs

Subaru says the outgoing six-cylinder R Boxer powerplant sustains just lb-ft of torque from 2,, rpm. The new XT turbocharged Outback models benefit from a less broad torque curve, with its lb-ft. of torque achieved from 2, rpm through 4, rpm. The new Outback XT’s available torque should make a big difference for those pulling a high mountain pass loaded with cargo and people, when pulling a trailer, or climbing a steep mountain trail.

What about fuel economy

The Outback naturally aspirated six-cylinder R engine gets an EPA estimated 20/27 city/highway mpg and 22 combined mpg. The new Outback FA24 liter engine manufacturer’s estimated fuel economy is 23/30 mpg city/highway with the turbo. Recent reports say the bigger Ascent with the same FA24 liter turbo isn’t quite getting its 21/27 city highway estimated mpg in the real world.

Why did Subaru ditch the 6-cylinder?

The R’s demise is no surprise because Subaru Corporation spelled it out in their “Prominence " plan. The plan outlines every Subaru boxer engine will come with the latest Direct Injection technology. Iy also said customers would see smaller turbo engines developing more power and with greater fuel efficiency in the new-generation Subaru vehicles. So far they have produced that in the new Legacy and now Outback.

suv

Pulling power

When equipped with the turbocharged engine, the next-generation Outback is capable of towing 3, lbs. up from the R’s lb rating. This is a considerable jump due to all that extra available torque. More pulling power will be available from the liter turbo with its peak torque at low rpms. If you are pulling a steep trail the XT will have plenty of low-rpm grunt to get the job done.

If there is a weak link in the Outback power train it’s the Lineartronic CVT automatic transmission. Subaru has made a commitment to the transmission for its fuel-saving characteristics. On the upside, it does feature an 8-speed manual mode function with steering wheel paddle shifters. Subaru keeps improving their CVT, so we’ll see how it performs with the new turbo engine.

liter is improved

For those who don’t need more power, Subaru still offers the liter normally aspirated Boxer engine in the new Outback. It now features nearly 90 percent new parts, as well as direct injection and auto stop/start, and increased output and fuel efficiency. The new engine produces horsepower and lb.-ft. of torque compared with the outgoing model with hp and lb-ft. of torque. Manufacturer’s estimated fuel economy is 26/33 mpg city/highway for the liter.

You May Also Like:How New Subaru L Turbo Engine Compares To Competition’s V6 Power

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Sours: https://www.torquenews.com//new-subaru-outback-xtl-turbo-vs-discontinuedl-engine

Subaru Outback R review

What is the Subaru Outback R?

An all-new Subaru Outback is on the horizon but this current model still feels fresh in its sunset year. And while the R’s flat straight-six cylinder engine seems a little archaic in this age of turbocharged and hybrid SUVs, it provides the Outback with a welcome power boost that manages to increase both practicality and driveability.

Subaru Outback R

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What’s the Subaru Outback R like to drive?

It’s when you’re comfortably seated behind the wheel where you question if it’s right to categorise the Subaru Outback as a large SUV.

The Outback is actually based on the Subaru Liberty and, even with its handy mm ground clearance, it corners in kind, thanks to its relatively low overall height and flat boxer engine that contribute to a lower centre of gravity than your average SUV.

Subaru Outback

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Handling is also helped by light steering, a smooth ride and taut suspension that’s firm to cater to a variety of road surfaces, but rides over imperfections with little fuss.

MORENext-gen Subaru Outback XT revealed with turbo power

The all-wheel-drive system even splits the engine's power to the front and rear axles, and you can tackle some pretty tricky terrain with Subaru’s X Mode system that helps safely negotiate slippery surfaces and inclines by constantly monitoring the traction available to each wheel and controlling the engine, transmission, brakes and other components accordingly.

With heaps of air between the ground and the Outback's underpinnings, it'll take you reasonably far off the beaten trail too.

Subaru Outback R engine

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The kW/Nm litre six-cylinder engine provides about 50 percent more power than the litre four-cylinder petrol, which means you rarely feel like you’re running out of puff. Like the sporty Subaru WRX, it has a three-mode SI-Drive that allows you to set the transmission to provide a ‘Short Sharp’ rev burst on take-off instead of the more gradual standard acceleration.

That Newtons of torque contributes to a kg maximum braked towing capacity, which is kg more than the diesel Outback.

What’s the Subaru Outback R like to live with?

The term crossover tends to be applied small SUVs these days, but the Subaru Outback is one of the truest interpretations of the term. It looks like a high-riding wagon, like a Skoda Superb 4x4 or Holden Calais Tourer, but is deceptively large. which gives it a best-of-both-worlds mix of wagon dynamics, AWD traction,  and large-SUV practicality and ground clearance - albeit without a third row of seats.

The Outback makes use of its interior expanse well to provide a good blend of cabin comfort and cargo area. The litre boot space is less than most large SUVs because of its lower roof height, but it’s wide and long, with m from the tailgate to the rear seats.

Put the seats down and you can fit m-long loads, though I managed to fit a m buffet in there by pushing the front seat forward a little. This brought my average frame a little closer to the steering wheel, but not uncomfortably so.

The boot floor is also lower than other SUVs which helps make loading and unloading a little easier.

 Subaru Outback boot

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The Outback R sits at the top of the range with a $50, retail price that brings all the Premium-spec features including leather trim. It costs $ more than the four-cylinder petrol i Premium, and $ more the turbo-diesel d Premium, with the extra cost bringing an speaker Harman Kardon premium sound system as well as the more powerful six-cylinder engine.

MOREBoot sizes of Australia's favourite SUVs

You also get: An inch touchscreen with satellite navigation and Apple CarPlay/Android Auto, reversing camera with side and front views, roof rails, dual-zone climate control air-conditioning, rain-sensing windscreen wipers, inch alloy wheels, powered tailgate, push-button start, smart key entry and power-adjusted and heated front seats.

Subaru Outback

9

Then there’s Subaru’s EyeSight active safety system that brings adaptive cruise control, lane-keeping assist, autonomous emergency braking with pedestrian detection. Blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert are also included.

MORE Subaru Outback range review

The Outback’s interior is nicely laid out, with plenty of functions easily accessible on the steering wheel. The touchscreen is embedded in the dashboard, which is a little old-school these days, but it’s big and has sharp graphics.

I had an issue where Apple CarPlay occasionally didn’t connect even though the phone was charging via the USB connection, though I can’t say if this is a problem in all Outbacks.

The front seats are broad and comfortable and the rear bench can recline slightly and easily accommodate three adults who’ll have no issue with leg- or headroom.

Subaru Outback

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Three child seats can be fitted across the rear seat using the standard top-tether anchor points, or you can fit up to two using ISOFIX anchors. The rear doors open wide, which helps with putting children in their seats.

Rear-seat amenity is further improved with air-conditioning vents, two USB ports and a folding centre armrest.

The Outback R’s additional oomph comes with an official combined fuel economy of L/km which is on a par with other six-cylinder large SUVs.

That said, I found myself averaging around L/km without leaving town. By comparison, the litre four-cylinder version uses L/km combined.

Subaru Outback

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The six-cylinder engine costs a bit more to service, though, like all new Outbacks it’s covered by five years/,km capped price servicing.

The Subaru Outback is also covered by a five-year, unlimited-kilometre warranty.

Is the Subaru Outback R worth it?

The Subaru Outback doesn’t do much wrong and while it doesn’t have knockout showroom appeal, it’s likely to win you over on points once you start ticking boxes.  

Its $50, retail price is good value when you consider it includes the permanent AWD system and Eyesight active safety, and that you’d be hard-pressed to find a similarly-equipped and sized SUV for under $55,

Subaru Outback rear

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But is it worth paying $ more than the four-cylinder i Premium? If most of your driving is around town than the smaller engine should do the trick, but the big six will rise to any occasion and provide you with an additional kg of towing power. Whatever you spend on a Subaru Outback you get what you pay for so you can be confident that you’re getting good value.

MORESubaru's X Mode system explained

Another thing worth considering is the Outback will be replaced by a new generation model within 12 months. While this is often cause to hold off your purchase, it’s highly likely the six-cylinder version won’t carry over so, if this engine is right for you, get in there while you can. 

Sours: https://www.whichcar.com.au/car-reviews/subaru-outbackr-review
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Subaru Outback Drops 6-cyl, Adds XT Turbo Trims

The Subaru Outback has been a thorn in the side of slab-sided crossovers and SUVs everywhere for a decade. It’s wagon-like design, and formidable all-wheel-drive technology has earned it legions of loyal fans, and the sixth-generation Outback, set to debut for the model year, does little to change the formula. Instead, Subaru further improves the design inside and out while offering more punch under the hood.

While the updated look and new tech features are noteworthy, one of the most significant changes happens under the hood. Gone is the liter six-cylinder engine. Replacing it is a turbocharged liter four-cylinder making horsepower. That’s four more horsepower than the liter engine. Models with this new engine get the XT trim designation. The new engine also gives the Outback its best tow rating ever—3, pounds.

The old six-cylinder mill was thirsty by comparison. The new engine is EPA-rated at 23 mpg city and 30 mpg highway—a three mpg improvement for each over the previous six-pot powertrain. So the smaller, turbo engine is not only more powerful and capable than the outgoing model, but it’s also more fuel efficient.

The engine could entice those upset that Subaru Forester lots its XT trim with the model year. However, the turbo liter engine in the previous Forester packed more punch per liter, making horsepower, just 10 fewer horsepower than the liter turbo in the new Outback.

While Subaru updated the design inside and out, the new Outback looks much like the previous one—and that’s a good thing. A nip and a tuck here, some bright trim there, and you have a refreshed Outback. Inside, designers moved the interior more upscale with a massive inch infotainment display that looks out of the Volvo parts bin. Overall, the refreshed design, updated interior, and the new engine should keep loyal fans satisfied.

The Subaru Outback goes on sale this fall. Pricing will be announced closer to launch.

Learn about the current Outback on sale now »

Sours: https://www.carsdirect.com/automotive-news/subaru-outback-dropscyl-adds-xt-turbo-trims
Is the 2019 Subaru Outback 3.6R an SUV or the PERFECT Wagon?

Subaru Outback Engine Options: or XT—Which Engine Is Best?

What we've learned from testing both Outback engine options

If you're considering a Subaru Outback, you've probably wondered if the XT engine is any good. Now that the Outback's engine upgrade model has seriously improved its fuel economy, the XT could become a viable candidate for an increasing number of buyers. If you're comparing the against the (XT) engine or just want to know what the base Outback is like to drive, keep reading.

Outback Fuel Economy: Class-Competitive Numbers

For a midsize wagon with SUV pretenses, the Outback's fuel economy is pretty good. As you compare the Subaru to other SUVs, keep in mind that every Outback has standard AWD. If you stick with the liter naturally aspirated four-cylinder base engine, that hp powerplant delivers 26/33 mpg city/highway, 1 mpg better than the last-gen model in both city and highway numbers and competitive in its loosely defined segment. If you match the Outback against the best compact SUV around—the Honda CR-V—it's basically a tie. The CR-V T delivers 27/32 mpg in AWD form, or an even higher 28/34 mpg if you don't mind sticking with FWD. Against the Hyundai Santa Fe, the Subaru scores a clear win. The Outback's 26/33 mpg rates well against a Santa Fe AWD's 21/27 mpg (or 22/29 with FWD). No matter which engine you choose, all Outbacks run on regular gas.

The real news with the Outback's engine options is the new-to-Outback liter turbo-four. Producing hp, the engine helps the Outback earn 23/30 mpg, way better than the R six-cylinder of the last-gen model, which was only good for 20/ Although there are reasons to like Subaru's downsizing move, as you'll see below, the way the engine interacts with the car's standard CVT could still use some refining.

Outback Driving Range: The Real Advantage

Fuel economy isn't much different between the Outback and the CR-V T, but driving range sure is. Thanks to the Outback's gigantic gallon gas tank, the Subaru trounces the competition. Go with the EPA's driving breakdown of 55 percent city driving and 45 percent highway, and the Outback will go miles before needing a fill-up—that's a more than mile advantage over the CR-V. The Santa Fe is closer, with a mile range with an AWD model, but that's only with the more efficient liter base engine.

The Outback's move from the six-cylinder R model to the turbo-four XT model pays dividends not just with mpgs, but with additional miles between gas station visits. Again, using the 55 percent city/45 percent highway split from the EPA, the Outback XT will go 74 miles farther on a tank of gas than the Outback six-cylinder model (for a total of miles).

Where the CR-V may soon beat both Outback engine options is a sub-segment the Toyota RAV4 already dominates: hybrids. There's no Subaru Outback hybrid, but the Toyota RAV4 hybrid is good for 41/38 mpg and a driving range of nearly miles. Expect similar numbers for the upcoming CR-V hybrid.

Outback Acceleration: Improved, But Is It Enough?

Outback drivers don't generally race from stoplight to stoplight, but even SUVs and wagons will eventually need to crest a hill with a full load of people, or pass a big truck on a two-lane road. And that's where the Outback falters. The CVT's fake gear shifts with heavy acceleration can't disguise a mph time of seconds. Remember that the CR-V matched the Outback's mpgs? It does so with a second performance to As for the Outback , we called it "gutless" at SUV of the Year testing. Still, for day-to-day driving, the Outback gets the job done. Drivers who can accept that passing other vehicles will take longer should be happy with the 's lower price and higher fuel economy.

Those who want to see what the hp XT engine has to offer will need to stick with the Onyx XT, Limited XT, and Touring XT trims. Although we found the Onyx fun to slide around off-road, the powertrain proved underwhelming on the road. To 60 mph, the engine impresses, with a second time that easily improves on the Outback R's seconds. That's not the full story, though. On the road, we called the engine "unrefined," and the power delivery proved uneven. For a few MotorTrend editors, the engine-transmission interaction is rough enough that we'd select the liter engine to avoid it.

Outback Handling, Ride, and Transmission

No matter which of the two engine options you pick, the Outback won't handle like a sports car. In the big wagon-SUV's case, spirited driving will be met by a healthy dose of body roll. The Subaru's chief advantage is its superb suspension tuning. Multiple staffers have complimented the comfortable way the Outback rolls down the road, even one with imperfections or railroad tracks. It's a dynamic advantage you won't find on some competitors at any price.

The CVT is another story. Although most of us found it responsive, the transmission's fake upshifts and downshifts aren't for everyone. As we've mentioned, the real disappointment comes with the XT/CVT combination. We hope the Outback XT models sport a recalibrated transmission that's better equipped to responsively handle that powerful turbo-four.

Which Outback Engine Option Is Best?

There's no unanimous victor here, at least on the MotorTrend staff. Having said that, most of us would probably pick the base liter engine. Outback models are slow, but it's not a deal-breaking disadvantage. So if you didn't have your heart set on the XT-only Onyx model, consider the liter models to save a little cash, mpgs, and headache during those times when you need a quick response from a car's engine and transmission.

More on the Outback:

  • Subaru Outback Limited First Test here
  • Subaru Outback Pros and Cons Review here
  • Off-Roading the Subaru Outback: 10 Things to Know
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Cylinder 2020 subaru outback 6

UPDATE 1/13/ This review has been updated with test results.

"We do a lot of research at Subaru," says Outback car-line manager Peter Tenn, almost in apology as he shows his 20th consecutive slide of customer research charts to a crowd of just-post-coffee auto writers. But given the brand's continued sales success—Subaru just concluded its month run of consecutive monthly year-over-year sales growth—we doubt that the company is going to lay off the research any time soon.

Subaru isn't interested solely in who its customers are (in the case of the Outback, it's a year-old married man with a college degree making slightly less than $, a year); it also obsessively researches what those customers want. And what they want is for everything to stay mostly the same.

HIGHS: Competent off-road, spacious rear seat, leading-edge tech features.

In the design process for this sixth-generation Outback, Subaru workshopped four different design ideas with potential customers. And wouldn't you know it, those folks liked the one that looks almost exactly like the outgoing model. Even design details that Subaru touts as being new, such as the scalloped black rocker panels meant to evoke the sole of a hiking boot, have roots in the previous generation's design.

Inside, more has changed.

An available vertically oriented inch infotainment display is the centerpiece of the interior, except in the base model, which makes do with a two-screen setup. Subaru uses two processors to keep response times quick. One controls media functions, and the other deals with climate.

The Outback retains knobs for volume and tuning as well as physical controls for adjusting the cabin temperature (although Subaru has switched from dials to buttons for that task). In our experience, the new infotainment system was quick and useful, but some vehicle controls, like the ones that activated the off-road driving mode, were buried in a hard-to-navigate menu structure.

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Subaru's available driver-monitoring system, introduced on the Forester, uses face-scanning software to recognize up to five drivers and recall preferences for things such as seating position and climate control, a bit of convenience tech for Outbacks with a lot of drivers.

Subaru heavily revised the Outback's base engine, employing some 90 percent new parts. Also used by the Forester, this liter flat-four now makes horsepower. The Ascent's hp turbocharged liter boxer-four is used in the Outback's three upper trim levels, which are denoted by an XT badge.

All models come with a continuously variable automatic transmission (CVT) that can mimic an eight-speed automatic. That's a novel programing improvement over the previous generation's CVT, which imitated a six-speed. And every Outback is all-wheel drive, naturally.

LOWS: Ho-hum powertrains, slow design evolution, occasionally sluggish CVT.

The Outback now rides on the more rigid Subaru Global Platform, which can absorb 40 percent more energy in a frontal collision than the outgoing platform, says Subaru. The suspension is updated, too, with hollow anti-roll bars in the front and rear for weight savings, though the strut front and multilink rear layouts are unchanged. The car is inches longer and inch wider than last year's model.

The added length went to the rear seat, which offers an additional inches of legroom. Changes to the cargo-measuring procedures mean that the Outback's cargo space behind the rear seat, 33 cubic feet, is nominally smaller than last year's, but Subaru says that when measured using the same method, the new hold is one cube larger than in the model.

Subaru says that a quarter of Outback owners actually use their cars' off-road capabilities, making it the second-most off-roaded vehicle in the company's line-up, behind the Crosstrek. That's far from a quorum, but it's enough a part of the brand's image that our assigned drive route was heavily biased towards one-lane dirt roads and across unmaintained California ranch lands.

The car didn't perform any magic tricks. The most technical move we executed was an uphill left turn with the left-rear tire off the ground. But with inches of ground clearance, the Outback felt capable and sure-footed on gravel, grass, steep hills, and rutted two-tracks. We managed to initiate some wheelslip in a sweeping dirt-road bend, but it took effort. This car doesn't have much of Subaru's rally heritage baked in, but it took us places we wouldn’t have been comfortable going to in a Buick Regal TourX or a Ford Edge. And though we needed no further proof that press junkets are carefully crafted to glorify the model on display, driving the Outback on a dirt road feet above the Pacific Ocean without another soul in sight made it seem insane to think of buying a car that couldn't get us there.

But most people drive on paved roads most of the time. And there, the Outback is less inspiring. The car's ride is fairly smooth and compliant, if occasionally less responsive than we'd like. But the hp engine feels adequate at best, and the CVT isn't very adept at finding torque; you'll want to switch into the manual shift mode when accelerating uphill or passing on the freeway. During our testing, that engine propelled the Outback to 60 mph in seconds and through the quarter mile in seconds at 84 mph. That's an acceptable effort in a car this size, but it won't have you clamoring to get back in the driver's seat.

The hp turbo four is, predictably, a much more willing partner, and made it to 60 mph in seconds in our hands. That engine brings much-needed extra thrust when performing a pass. In our top-gear tomph test, the turbo is second quicker than an Outback equipped with the base engine. Despite its more powerful engine, the XT doesn't feel much gutsier than the base model from a stop and at around town speeds. And the g of lateral grip that we measured on the skidpad spoke to its thoroughly average handling limits.

Incrementalism.

Subaru's model overhauls are all about incrementalism. It makes sense. People hate change, and Subaru loves giving its people what they want. The Outback is Subaru's best-selling model, and the new one is better than the old one. It's now more spacious in the back seat, more powerful, and has more modern features. It doesn't feel like a revelation, but it doesn't need to. If there's a ceiling to the demand for Subarus, we haven't found it yet. We can't blame the company for building profitable, consistent products, even if they are a little boring. And if a sea change comes, Subaru will be ready for it. It's probably already running a study.

Specifications

Specifications

Subaru Outback Touring

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, all-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door wagon

PRICE AS TESTED
$38, (base price: $38,)

ENGINE TYPE
DOHC valve flat-4, aluminum block and heads, direct fuel injection
Displacement
cu in, cc
Power
hp @ rpm
Torque
lb-ft @ rpm

TRANSMISSION
continuously variable automatic

CHASSIS
Suspension (F/R): struts/multilink
Brakes (F/R): in vented disc /in vented disc
Tires: Yokohama Avid GT, /60R H M+S

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: in
Length: in
Width: in
Height: in
Passenger volume: cu ft
Cargo volume: 33 cu ft
Curb weight: lb

C/D
TEST RESULTS
Rollout, 1 ft: sec
60 mph: sec
mph: sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: sec
¼-mile: sec @ 84 mph
Top speed (C/D est): mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: ft
Roadholding, ft-dia skidpad: g

C/D
FUEL ECONOMY
Observed: 21 mpg
mph highway driving: 28 mpg
Highway range: miles

EPA FUEL ECONOMY
Combined/city/highway: 29/26/33 mpg

Subaru Outback Touring XT

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, all-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door wagon

PRICE AS TESTED
$40, (base price: $40,) 

ENGINE TYPE
turbocharged and intercooled DOHC valve flat-4, aluminum block and heads, direct fuel injection
Displacement
cu in, cc
Power
hp @ rpm
Torque
lb-ft @ rpm

TRANSMISSION
continuously variable automatic

CHASSIS
Suspension (F/R): struts/multilink
Brakes (F/R): in vented disc /in vented disc
Tires: Yokohama Avid GT, /60R H M+S

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: in
Length: in
Width: in
Height: in
Passenger volume: cu ft
Cargo volume: 33 cu ft
Curb weight: lb

C/D
TEST RESULTS
Rollout, 1 ft: sec
60 mph: sec
mph: sec
mph: sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: sec
¼-mile: sec @ 96 mph
Top speed (governor limited): mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: ft
Roadholding, ft-dia skidpad: g

C/D
FUEL ECONOMY
Observed: 20 mpg
mph highway driving: 28 mpg
Highway range: miles

EPA FUEL ECONOMY
Combined/city/highway: 26/23/30 mpg

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2016 Subaru Outback 3.6R review - Top 5 reasons to buy video

Introducing the Subaru Outback

* Manufacturer's suggested retail price does not include destination and delivery charges, tax, title and registration fees. Destination and delivery includes handling and inland freight fees and may vary in some states. Prices, specifications, options, features and models subject to change without notice.

** EPA-estimated fuel economy. Actual mileage may vary. For Crosstrek Hybrid, EPA-estimated MPG equivalent on a full battery charge. Actual mileage will vary.

$1 helps provide at least 10 meals secured by Feeding America on behalf of local member food banks.

***Limited warranties are contingent on age and mileage. Whatever comes first concludes the warranty.

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PLEASE REVIEW THESE IMPORTANT DISCLOSURES.
Subaru of America, Inc. reserves the right to make changes at any time without notice or obligation to the information contained on this Internet site, prices, incentive programs, specifications, equipment, colors, materials, product illustrations and to change or discontinue models. All prices are based upon Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Prices (""MSRP"") in U.S. dollars (unless otherwise indicated) and exclude taxes, title fees, licensing, options and destination charges unless specifically included. Retailers are independent businesses and are free to set their own retail prices. All information contained at this Internet site is intended for the USA market only.

Sours: https://www.subaru.com/vehicles/outback/index.html

Now discussing:

Say Goodbye To The Subaru Outback R; Why Customers Won’t Miss It

Customers who want an Outback R six-cylinder model need to move quickly to get one. The Outback is coming later this year and Subaru Corporation will completely redesign the popular SUV/Crossover and will likely drop the R trim forever. The Subaru Outback comes in Limited and R Touring trims that offer the liter Boxer engine with hp and lb-ft of torque.

Right now, Subaru is offering special deals on all Outback trims. Customers can get 0% APR Financing on all Outback models now through April 1, Subaru wants to move all remaining Outback SUVs off their dealer lots before the all-new models arrive later this year.

Why you might want to wait

Here’s why customers wanting an Outback might want to wait for the model year. When the new-generation Outback arrives this year, it will likely feature a new turbocharged liter direct injection four-cylinder engine replacing the old six-cylinder Outback R. Like the Legacy, it will likely be called the Outback XT and use the same Ascent-sourced turbocharged liter hp lb-ft of torque Boxer engine. This will outperform the outgoing the liter Boxer engine in power and fuel mileage.

The Outback R gets an EPA estimated 20/27 city/highway mpg and 22 combined mpg. The Ascent liter turbo has more horsepower and torque and achieves 21/27 city/highway and 23 combined mpg and it’s a bigger vehicle than the Outback. Look for a new Outback L to have better fuel mileage numbers.

New liter turbo will outperform competition with a V6

The new Outback FA24 liter boxer turbocharged direct-injection boxer engine will achieve acceleration and power equal to or better than that of competing vehicles with liter 6-cylinder engines. That is accomplished by adding torque over horsepower because torque is what gets a vehicle moving from a stop and helps in pulling the vehicle up a hill, or when towing.

The next-generation Subaru Outback will lose the R trim but gain a new XT liter turbo model. Outback will keep its core values with safety being a strong point with EyeSight driver assist standard equipment, and the SUV will keep its “go-anywhere” attitude with inches of ground clearance, all-wheel drive will remain standard on the Outback, and it will retain X-Mode for off-road adventures.

When the all-new Subaru Outback with the new Global Platform arrives late this summer, look for the new SUV to be even more popular with active consumers looking for an all-weather all-wheel-drive vehicle. If you want the R trim you need to act quickly, but if you can wait, the new turbocharged XT trim will be worth it.

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Photo credit: Subaru USA

Sours: https://www.torquenews.com//say-goodbye-subaru-outbackr-why-customers-won-t-miss-it


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