Hanging grow bags for flowers

Hanging grow bags for flowers DEFAULT

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags

Want to dress up your outdoor living area with flowers for less money? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.

a hanging flower pouch filled with red, white, and purple petunias hanging on a white fence with a tree trunk in the background

If you like the look of those expensive planter bags at your local garden center, why not make them yourself? They are simple to make, and before you know it, you will have a bag of your favorite flowers hanging colorfully from your porch railings, rooftop garden, back fence or anywhere you might have a small space you would like to fill with colorful, vibrant flowers in a vertical planter.

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags

By making your own bags you choose the flowers and colors. You can choose to make your flower bags organic if you prefer organic gardening. These lant bags are great if you are trying to encourage specific types of butterflies (hanging butterfly flower bag), hummingbirds (hanging hummingbird flower bag), bees (hanging bee flower bag), or to match your backyard or front yard theme and colors. Just make certain to use flowers that will drape as they grow. This tutorial is using petunias, which are an easy-to-grow.

Six hanging flower pouches filled with red, white, and purple petunias hanging on nails on a wooden fence

Tips and variations for making these hanging flower bags:

● If you want to add a slow-release fertilizer, mix it in with your dirt instead of trying to add a little soluble fertilizer to every row of flowers up to the top of the planter bag.

● I advise using starter plants instead of seeds. While a packet of seeds is even less expensive, you need your flowers to poke through the slits in the bags. Now, if you want to grow your own flowers from flower seeds, click here to read how to grow garden seedlings indoors.

● Read up here on how to make your own potting soil mix.

● Be sure to pack your bags as tight as possible in between flowers. Fill the potting mix up to the holes, place two flowers through the holes, and then pack the potting mix. Be sure to press down firmly before inserting the next row of flowers. You do not want to have gaps in your bags. For best results, bags should be compact with a potting mix so your flowers can root.

● When pulling your flowers through the hole, be sure to protect the leaves and be gentle. Protect the leaves in your hand and guide them through the hole carefully and with care. It is normal to lose some leaves, but be sure that all the leaves are through the hole and not inside the bag.

● Do not worry if your flowers look limp at first. They will perk back up in about a day.

● When watering, be sure to soak your flower bag. The water needs to get all the way down to the bottom of the bag! These bags need a lot of water and should be checked on daily to thrive.

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags Materials:

● Potting Mix
● Al&#;s Flower Pouches (10 hole was used in this tutorial)
● Petunias or any draping annual flower you want in your bags. The number of flowers you need depends on how big your bags are and how many you are making. You will need one flower for each hole. For this tutorial 10 petunias were used per bag.

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags Tools:

● Hand Shovel
● Watering Can or Hose

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags Directions:

1. Gather all materials and set up your workspace.
2. Grab a pouch, and using your shovel, fill the pouch with potting mix up to the bottom two holes.
3. Remove a flower from its container by gently squeezing the plastic. Make sure you have gotten the entire root system to promote future plant growth.

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.
How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.
How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.
How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.

4. Holding the roots of the flower in your palm and protecting the leaves of the flower in your hand, insert the flower into the bag. Navigate the flower carefully to the bottom of the bag to the hole. Using your other hand, carefully guide the flower through the hole. One hand should be inside the bag holding the flower while the other hand is on the outside of the bag guiding the flower through the hole. Be sure that all leaves, stems, and flowers are exposed through the hole.

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.

5. Repeat the step above for your second flower in the bottom row of the bag.

6. Now, you should have the bottom row filled with two flowers; double-check that all leaves and stems are exposed through the hole. Grab your shovel and pack with potting mix to the next set of holes. Be sure to press down inside the bag firmly with your hand. Be sure that the bag is filled out with potting soil, with no gaps.

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.

7. Repeat step 4 with additional plants for both sets of holes in this row.
8. Once you have two more flowers and the row is complete, repeat step 6 and pack with potting mix.

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.

9. Continue repeating steps 4 and 6 until all of your holes are filled with flowers and your bag is complete.
Pack the top of the bag with potting mix and press down. The potting mix should be filled to the top of the pouch leaving only about 2 inches of the bag not filled.

How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.
How to Make Hanging Flower Bags. Want to dress up your outdoor living area for less? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.

Water your flower bag and hang it where desired. Remember these petunias (used in this tutorial) love the sun, so be sure to put them in a sunny area where they will get hours of sunlight. Water your flower bag when the soil is dry and drench the bag so water gets all the way to the bottom corners of the pouch. If you packed these correctly, there will be good drainage and your flowers will not get wet feet.

Yield: 1
How to Make Hanging Flower Bags

Want to dress up your outdoor living area with flowers for less money? Make your own hanging flower pouches using the instructions in this complete guide. Using your favorite flowers that drape, these easy-to-make flower bags are perfect for deck railings, deck posts, lamp posts, hanging basket hooks, or even to decorate your mailbox! This terrific vertical flower bag allows you to bring a garden anywhere.

Additional Time5 minutes

Instructions

    1. Gather all materials and set up your workspace.
    2. Grab a pouch, and using your shovel, fill the pouch with potting mix up to the bottom two holes.
    3. Remove a flower from its container by gently squeezing the plastic. Make sure you have gotten the entire root system to promote future plant growth.
    4. Holding the roots of the flower in your palm and protecting the leaves of the flower in your hand, insert the flower into the bag. Navigate the flower carefully to the bottom of the bag to the hole. Using your other hand carefully guide the flower through the hole. One hand should be inside the bag holding the flower while the other hand is on the outside of the bag guiding the flower through the hole. Be sure that all leaves, stems, and flowers are exposed through the hole.
    5. Repeat the step above for your second flower in the bottom row of the bag.
    6. Now you should have the bottom row filled with two flowers, double-check that all leaves and stems are exposed through the hole. Grab your shovel and pack with potting mix to the next set of holes. Be sure to press down inside the bag firmly with your hand. Be sure that the bag is filled out with potting soil, with no gaps.
    7. Repeat step 4 with additional plants for both sets of holes in this row.
    8. Once you have two more flowers and the row is complete, repeat step 6 and pack with potting mix.
    9. Continue repeating steps 4 and 6 until all of your holes are filled with flowers and your bag is complete.
    10. Pack the top of the bag with potting mix and press down. Potting mix should be filled to the top of the pouch leaving only about 2 inches of the bag not filled.
    11. Water your flower bag and hang it where desired. Remember these petunias (used in this tutorial) love the sun, so be sure to put them in a sunny area where they will get hours of sunlight. Water your flower bag when the soil is dry and drench the bag so water gets all the way to the bottom corners of the pouch. If you packed these correctly, there will be good drainage and your flowers will not get wet feet.

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Six hanging flower pouches filled with red, white, and purple petunias hanging on nails on a wooden fence

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Filed Under: How Does Your Garden Grow

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Hessian Hanging Flower Bags

Full Description

These Hessian Hanging Flower Bags are made from hessian, which is biodegradable and much more attractive than the plastic versions and are great for creating colourful all year round displays. Hanging bags are much easier to prepare and look after than hanging baskets as they require much less water and feed. The bag will last at least 2 seasons and much longer if emptied and stored dry when not in use. Available in packs of 4, 10, 30 or in cases of

Hessian Hanging Flower Bags are very easy to plant. In the summer, fill with bizzie lizzies and fuchsias for the shade or petunias, bedding begonias or trailing geraniums for the sun. Plant them up with pansies in the Autumn. Simply fill with a good quality potting compost and insert Water Slices (if using), placing them evenly in the bag as you fill it with compost. Lay the bag flat to plant, increasing the size of the holes to take the roots. Water the bags and leave for weeks before hanging the bag up and planting one or two plants in the top.

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Sours: https://www.greengardener.co.uk/product/hessian-hanging-flower-bags/
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How to Plant a Hanging Flower Bag

Materials

  • Planter bag
  • General-purpose potting mix
  • Granular slow-release fertilizer
  • Annual garden plants

Gardening Tip

You may be able to repurpose a reusable tote bag for groceries or books into a hanging planter by filling it with potting mix and cutting slits in the sides for plants. This works best with fairly small bags, as the flower bag will get somewhat heavy when it is filled with potting mix and watered. The best bags for this purpose are made with a fiber-reinforced plastic fabric rather than standard textile cloth.

  1. Prepare and Add Potting Mix

    If your potting mix does not have fertilizer already mixed in, blend in some slow-release fertilizer, following the directions on the package. All-purpose organic fertilizer is a good choice.

    To add soil to the planter bag, hold the empty bag upright and add a few scoops of the prepared potting mix Make sure that the bottom corners are full of soil, then continue filling the bag until the potting mix is nearly to the top.

  2. Settle the Potting Mix

    Hold the planter bag by the top and tap the bottom of it gently on the ground several times to help settle the soil. After you do this, check the soil level because it may have compacted. Add more potting mix if needed, leaving an inch or so between the top of the soil and the top of the planter bag.

  3. Secure the Top of the Planter Bag

    To prevent the potting mix from falling out as you add plants to the bag, fold over the top of the flower bag and secure it with binder clips, tape, or clothespins. This step makes the planting process much easier.

  4. Prepare the Plants

    Remove each seedling from nursery container. To make it fit the hole, you might have to tear some roots off. It sounds radical, but don’t worry, most plants will recover very quickly, and it is actually good for the plant if it's root-bound. You can also try dipping the plants' roots in water and then rolling the root ball between your hands to form it into a narrower shape that will fit into the holes more easily.

    Using two fingers, reach through the hole in the planter bag and push the potting mix aside to form a small pocket.

  5. Plant the Bag

    Before adding plants, either lay the flower bag flat or prop it up at an angle. Stuff each plant into a hole in the bag. Be as gentle as possible, but you may need to be a little forceful to get the roots to fit. Try to make sure the plant is inserted into the hole just far enough so that the root ball doesn't stick out of the bag—you don't want to cover the plant's crown with soil.

    When you have finished planting all the holes, prop the flower bag upright and remove the binder clips. Hold on to the top of the flower bag and tap the bottom gently on the ground a few times, to help settle the soil around the plants.

    Check the level of the potting mix again and add more if necessary. Finish planting by adding two plants to the opening at the top of the Planter bag. This is a good place to use your biggest plants because you won't have to compress them to fit.

  6. Water the Planter Bag

    Water your finished flower bag generously, but slowly. The goal is to allow water to seep all the way to the bottom of the bag; if you are too impatient, the water will simply run off the top of the bag without penetrating to the bottom. To check, squeeze the bottom of the bag gently and see if water drains out of the lowest holes.

  7. Hang and Maintain the Planter Bag

    Leave your finished flower bag lying down or propped up slightly in a sunny, sheltered spot for seven to 10 days while the plants acclimate and get over any trauma they may have experienced. During this time, make sure not to over-water your flower bag, but when you water it, do it generously, making sure the water reaches the bottom plants.

    When your flower bag is ready, hang it from a hook, nail, or from a railing. Your planter bag will need to be watered frequently, especially during warm weather. Planter bags typically hold less potting mix than do large planters, so the soil dries out quite quickly. It's not uncommon for a planter bag to need two or three waterings a day during hot summer weather. To know if the bag needs water, poke your finger about 1 inch into the soil—if it feels dry to the touch, it's time to water.

    Fertilize your flower bag regularly with a diluted, water-soluble fertilizer, such as fish emulsion. Because they are getting watered so frequently, nutrients leach out of the potting mix rather quickly. Monthly feeding is mandatory with a hanging flower bag. Deadhead spent flowers as the blooms fade.

Learn How to Make a Raised Bed Garden

Sours: https://www.thespruce.com/how-to-plant-a-flower-bag
How to Fill Your Flower Pouch - Learn \u0026 Grow

There are lots of good reasons to use a grow bag for planting vegetables.  You can use them indoors or outdoors, even if you don’t have much space.  However, some plants either get too tall or have roots that are too deep for a grow bag.

So, what can you grow in a grow bag?  The best plants for a grow bag have shallow roots and will not grow too tall, such as peppers, lettuce, carrots, herbs, and flowers.  Some taller vine plants, such as tomatoes, cucumbers, and philodendron, can trail down from hanging grow bags, or they can grow upwards if you provide support.  Root vegetables such as onions, garlic, beets, and radishes are also ideal for grow bags.

Of course, using a grow bag involves more than just choosing which plants you want.  You also need to provide soil, mulch, and water for the plants in your grow bags.  You may need to hand-pollinate indoor plants, and you will need to provide support such as a stake, cage, or trellis for taller vine plants.

What Can You Grow In A Grow Bag

Grow bags have lots of benefits (see my article on pros and cons of grow bags), but one drawback is that they limit the root system of a plant.  They are also prone to falling over if the plant is too tall or top-heavy with fruit.  Let’s start off by looking at some plants with shallow roots that will not grow too tall.

Shallow-Rooted, Short Plants For Grow Bags

Let’s start off with some plants that are super-easy to manage in a grow bag: ones with shallow roots that don’t get too tall.

Growing Peppers In A Grow Bag

The roots of peppers only go as deep as 18 to 24 inches (46 to 61 centimeters), so a grow bag with a height of 2 feet (61 centimeters) should be sufficient for growing peppers.  For more information, check out this article from eartheasy.com on soil depth for garden vegetables.

Peppers are one of the taller plants in this category, since some varieties can grow up to 3 feet high or taller.

banana pepper plant

If you choose shorter pepper varieties, then you may not need any support for your plants at all.  However, if you choose a taller variety of pepper, such as the Long Tall Sally Hybrid Pepper from Burpee, then you may need some type of support for the plant as it grows (more on this later).

You may need to stake some varieties of pepper plants as they grow, to keep the grow bag from falling over. For more information, check out my article on how to keep pepper plants from falling over.

Growing Lettuce In A Grow Bag

The roots of lettuce only go as deep as 12 to 18 inches (30 to 46 centimeters), so you really only need a grow bag that is 1 to 2 feet (30 to 61 centimeters) deep.

Lettuce does not take up too much space above ground, since the foliage is compact and it does not spread to take up a large area. Most lettuce plants will not grow taller than 1 or 2 feet in height.

green lettuce

Most lettuce will only grow to a height of 1 to 2 feet tall before bolting (when seeds form and the lettuce starts to taste bitter).  As a result, you won’t need to worry about support for lettuce, and you won’t need to worry about your grow bag falling over due to the weight of the plant.

Try the Burpee Bibb Lettuce here.

Growing Carrots In A Grow Bag

The root of a carrot (which is the edible part!) only goes to a depth of 18 to 24 inches (46 to 61 centimeters).  In fact, most home gardeners have trouble getting carrots to grow longer than 1 foot (30 centimeters), so you won’t need a grow bag much deeper than that.

Carrots take up almost no space at all above ground.  All you will be able to see above ground is some small green growth (usually less than foot tall) that looks like parsley.

carrots

Be sure to keep rocks and soil clumps out of your grow bag – if carrots encounter any obstacles as they grow, the root will fork or split and the carrot will come out deformed (however, the taste will be unaffected.)

For an interesting twist on carrots, try the Purple Dragon Carrot from Burpee.  The carrots grow to 6 inches long, and the foliage above ground only grows as high as 4 to 8 inches tall.

If you have problems growing big carrots, or get small, bumpy, cracked, or deformed carrots, make sure your soil is good. For more information, check out my article on the best soil for growing carrots, and my article on how to prevent deformed carrots.

Growing Herbs In A Grow Bag

There are two good things about planting herbs in grow bags.  One benefit is that there is no fruit to speak of, so the plant will not be weighed down.  The other benefit is the shallow root systems of most herbs.

According to the University of Illinois Extension, the root system of most herbs will only grow to a depth of 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 centimeters), with 10 inches (25 centimeters) being the maximum.  So, a grow bag with a height of 1 foot (30 centimeters) should be sufficient for growing herbs.

Some herbs, such as rosemary, can grow to a height of 3 to 5 feet (91 to centimeters), with a similar width of 3 to 5 feet.  As such, you may want some support for some of the taller rosemary plants, such as the Tuscan Blue Rosemary from Burpee.

basil

You can also grow basil, sage, oregano (or Mexican Oregano!), thyme dill, fennel, and mint in your grow bags, among many other herbs.  For more information, check out this article from the University of Illinois Extension on growing herbs in containers.

Growing Flowers In A Grow Bag

As with herbs, there is no heavy fruit to worry about when planting flowers in grow bags.  In addition, most flower roots only grow to a maximum depth of 18 to 24 inches (46 to 61 centimeters), meaning that a 2-foot-tall grow bag is more than sufficient for most flowers.

You can find flowers that only grow to a height of 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 centimeters), such as the Cool Wave Raspberry Swirl Pansy from Burpee.  However, some flowers, such as the sunflower, can grow as tall as 30 feett &#; you can check it out on the Guinness Book of World Records!

pansy

You can also grow phlox, petunias, zinnias, and many other flower varieties in your grow bags.

Tall Vine Plants For Grow Bags

If you have a trellis or stakes to offer support, you can grow the following vine plants in your grow bags.  Alternatively, you can hang the grow bags and let the vines trail down to the ground, without providing any support at all.

Growing Tomatoes In A Grow Bag

Tomatoes have a deep root system, going as deep as 24 to 36 inches (61 to 91 centimeters) or more.  This means that you will need deeper grow bags for larger varieties of tomatoes.

Tomatoes come in two basic types: determinate and indeterminate.  Determinate tomatoes will grow to a maximum height, perhaps 4 to 5 feet ( to centimeters) and then stop growing.  Indeterminate tomatoes will grow until they are killed by winter frost, to a height of 6 to 10 feet ( to centimeters).

As such, many tomato varieties will require support in the form of cages (for shorter determinate varieties) or stakes and trellises (for taller indeterminate varieties). For more information, check out my article on tomato cages and my article on supporting tomato plants.

tomato stakes

If you don’t want to deal with setting up support for tomato plants, you can let gravity help you instead.  Just hang your grow bag up high (5 feet or higher), and let the tomato vines crawl down towards the ground as they wish.  That way, you won’t have to worry about the weight of fruit or vines knocking over the grow bag.

For something a little different, try the Yellow Pair Tomato from Burpee, which has 4 ounce yellow fruit in the shape of pears.

Growing Cucumbers In A Grow Bag

Cucumbers have a root system that reaches a depth of 18 to 24 inches (46 to 61 centimeters), so a 2-foot-tall grow bag is sufficient.

Some cucumber varieties can grow as tall as 6 to 7 feet ( to centimeters), while others will be less than a foot tall at maturity.  For more information, check out my article on the height of cucumbers.

This means that many cucumber varieties will need support in the form of a stake or trellis in order to grow to full height.  Otherwise, they will fall over and grow along the ground, creeping along until they find something to climb.

As with tomatoes, you can hang a grow bag with cucumbers and let the vines trail down towards the ground, eliminating the need to provide support to your plants as they grow.

For something a little different, try the White Wonder Cucumber from Burpee.

Growing Philodendrons In A Grow Bag

Philodendrons will happily grow in a grow bag with a depth of less than a foot, but their growth may be limited if the container is too small for a complete root system.

One of my oldest philodendron plants has a vine that is about 5 feet ( centimeters) long, but the vines can get longer than that.  If you provide support, the vines on your philodendron will gladly climb and wrap around a trellis as it grows taller.

purple velvet plant

Otherwise, you can hang your grow bag and let the philodendron vines make their way down to the ground.

I like the heart-leaf philodendron, which has white and green foliage and long vines (check out heart-leaf philodendron on myhouseplants.com), but there are lots of varieties of philodendron for you to choose from.

Root Vegetables For Grow Bags

The “fruit” of the following root vegetables grows underground, but they don’t go too deep, so you won’t have any problem if you plant them in grow bags.

Growing Onions In A Grow Bag

Onion roots only grow to a depth of 12 to 18 inches (30 to 46 centimeters), so a grow bag that is 2 feet tall is sufficient for them.

The part of the onion plant that grows above ground (long, thin green leaves) does not take up much space, and they are usually only about 12 inches (30 centimeters) tall.  You can tell than onions are done maturing when these leaves all fall over.

onions

Onions take a long time to mature (some can take days or more), so you need to be patient!  For an onion that stores well for a long time, check out the Patterson Hybrid Onion from Burpee.

If your onions always seem to end up smaller than you would like, check out my article on how to grow larger onions in your garden.

Growing Garlic In A Grow Bag

Garlic also has a root depth of only 12 to 18 inches (30 to 46 centimeters), so a grow bag that is 2 feet tall will hold them easily without disrupting growth.

Garlic can grow a little taller than onions above ground, with some varieties achieving heights of 24 inches (61 centimeters) or taller.

garlic

Try the Sonoran Garlic from Burpee, which can be harvested 90 days after planting in the spring.

Growing Beets In A Grow Bag

Beets have a root system that grows to a depth of 18 to 24 inches (46 to 61 centimeters), so a 2-foot-tall grow bag will be necessary.

Some beet varieties may only grow to a height of a foot or so (30 centimeters) above ground, so they don’t need any support.

beets

Try the Moulin Rouge Beet from Burpee, which has a purple-red color.

Growing Potatoes In A Grow Bag

Potatoes get an honorable mention because they have a shallow root system that only goes to a depth of 12 to 18 inches (30 to 46 centimeters).

The part of the potato plant above the soil can grow to a height of 2 feet (61 centimeters) or taller, but they generally do not need any support.

The best part about potatoes is the harvest.  At the end of the season, you can dump the contents of your grow bag into a wheelbarrow with a soil sifter on top.

Move the sifter back and forth, and all that will be left on top is your potato harvest.  The soil that went through the sifter can be reused after you add some compost and other nutrition.

For something a little different, try the Magic Molly Potato from Burpee.

For another interesting way to grow potatoes, check out my article on growing potatoes in a straw bale.

Conclusion

Now you have some ideas about what you can grow in your grow bags, depending on whether you can provide support to the plants, and how large the grow bags are.

You can learn more about what to consider when using grow bags indoors in my article here.

I hope you found this article helpful – if so, please share it with someone else who can use the information.  If you have any questions or advice about what you can grow in a grow bag, please leave a comment below.

Sours: https://greenupside.com/what-can-you-grow-in-a-grow-bag/

Bags hanging for flowers grow

How to Plant a Flower or Herb Bag

bag1.jpg (x -- bytes)bag3.jpg (x -- bytes)Step 1: Fill the flower bag with good quality lightweight potting mix which contains plenty of fertilizer nutrients.  Do not use a cheap mix, or it will compress and kill the plants.

Step 2: The mix in the flower bag must be wet thoroughly.  Moisten it after filling the bag by watering until the water drips out the bottom corners.

Step 3: Lay the bag flat at a comfortable height and pat down, forming a flat 'sausage' shape.

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top
end

Step 4: Cut T-shaped slits into the flower bag as shown at right. Use a sharp knife and make 3-cm cuts in each leg of the T. The T-shaped cuts should be facing upside down and only on one side, as the diagram below. Make a maximum of 8 cuts, two rows of four evenly spaced T cuts on the bag. Be careful when cutting the plastic. It is a good idea to mark the plastic before cutting. Use a permanent type marker.

bag5a.jpg (x -- bytes)bag5b.jpg (x81 -- bytes)Step 5: Planting

  • Using a dibber or similar implement, push into each cut to make a planting hole.  Remove a seedling from the cell pack or flat of plants, and push gently into the hole.
  •  
  • Pressing the bag gently around the plant will force the potting mix around the seedling.  Firm in well.  Repeat for all the holes.

Step 6: After planting, lay the flower bag under some shade cloth or in any semi-shaded spot for 3 to 4 weeks. The initial watering of the flower bag should be sufficient for this period.  The secret to success is not to move the bag for 3 weeks.  While there is plastic showing, avoid direct sunlight during hotter periods of the day or you will cook the plants.  Do not be in a hurry to hang up the plants!

Step 7: After 3 to 4 weeks you can display the flower bag flat or hang it up.  If required, top up with potting mix and insert a plant in the top.  Water generously so that water drips out of the cut corners at the bottom.

Step 8: Feed weekly with 1/2 strength plant food and every 3 to 4 months add some slow release fertilizer. Always deadhead plants to keep the hanging bag looking it's best.


Sours: http://www.ourgardengang.com/containerbags.htm
Vertical Hanging Growing Bag

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