Foreclosed homes for sale

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Buying a Foreclosed Home

Before the mortgage crisis of , buying a foreclosed home was a difficult proposition. Real estate bargain hunters had to follow auctions put on at courthouses or sift through reams of legal filings. The wave of foreclosures brought on by the subprime meltdown not only increased the number of available properties; it also made it easier to find and acquire them. In fact, today the process is often similar to the search for any other sort of home. Foreclosed homes are available in virtually every real estate market across the country, providing opportunities for homeowners and investors alike.

Key Takeaways

  • It’s never been easier to find a foreclosed home for sale. Many online sites specialize in them.
  • There are several types of foreclosure, including pre-foreclosure, short sale, sheriff's sale, and real estate owned.
  • The big advantage of buying a foreclosed home is the low price.
  • The disadvantages include a home’s possible bad condition, the length of the buying process, and competition from professional flippers.
  • Several government-sponsored financing options are available for foreclosed homes.

Click Play to Learn How to Buy a Foreclosed Home

How to Find Foreclosed Homes

One can find foreclosed properties in multiple-listing service (MLS) periodicals and websites, via online real estate searches, bank offices and websites, and local newspapers. In local multiple-listing services, the foreclosure status of properties may not be highlighted per se; the fact may only be stated in the property description.

A more direct route is via the many websites that now specialize in homes and properties in foreclosure, such as Fannie Mae’s HomePath.com. Some financial institutions, such as Bank of America, also offer pages dedicated to helping you search for a foreclosed home.

Lenders increasingly are selling their seized assets through real estate agents, so don’t hesitate to ask a real estate broker or agent for opportunities. Some real estate pros even specialize in foreclosure properties.

Various Stages of Foreclosure

Locating a foreclosed home depends on where exactly it is in the foreclosure process. Properties can still be owned by the original homeowner (in the earlier stages, like pre-foreclosure and short-sale properties), or by an entity such as a bank or the government (in the later ones).

Here are five types of foreclosure and approaches to buying.

1. Pre-foreclosures

A property is in pre-foreclosure after the mortgage lender has notified the borrowers that they are in default but before the property is offered for sale at auction. If a homeowner can sell the property during this time, they may be able to avoid an actual foreclosure proceeding and its negative effect on their credit history and future prospects.

Pre-foreclosures are typically listed in county and city courthouse buildings. In addition, many online resources, including Foreclosure.com, list properties that are in the pre-foreclosure phase.

2. Short sales

Short sales occur when the lender is willing to accept less for the property than what is owed on a mortgage. Borrowers do not necessarily need to be in default of the mortgage payments for a lender to agree to a short sale. However, they typically need to prove some type of financial hardship, such as the loss of a job, which is likely to result in default.

Often the residence in question is underwater, meaning it is worth less than the outstanding mortgage balance. In order to qualify as a short sale, the lender must agree to “sell the property short” by accepting less than is owed, and the home must be listed for sale. These properties are usually advertised as short sales “pending bank approval.”

Purchasing a short-sale property is in most regards the same as a traditional purchase, but the language in the contracts will differ, specifying that the terms are subject to the lender’s approval. A bank may take several months to respond to a short-sale offer, so the process can take considerably longer than a traditional purchase. Many real estate websites, including individual firms or listing services, offer the option to search by short-sale status.

3. Sheriff's sale auctions

A sheriff's sale auction occurs after the lender has notified the borrower of default and allowed a grace period for the borrower to catch up on mortgage payments. An auction is designed for the lender to get repaid quickly for the loan that is in default.

These auctions often occur on a city’s courthouse steps, managed by the local law-enforcement authorities. The property is auctioned to the highest bidder at a publicly announced place, date, and time. These notices can be found in local newspapers and in many online locations by performing a search for “sheriff sale auctions.”

4. Bank-owned properties

Properties that do not sell at auction revert back to the bank; that is, they become real estate-owned (REO) properties. They are often managed by the institution’s REO department. Online sources such as RealtyTrac have extensive listings of such bank-owned properties that can be searched by city, state, or ZIP code.

5. Government-owned properties

Some homes are purchased with loans guaranteed by the federal government’s Federal Housing Administration (FHA) or the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). When these properties go into foreclosure, they are repossessed by the government and sold by brokers working for that federal agency.

A government-registered broker must be contacted to purchase a government-owned property. Buyers can research possibilities on the website for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

Why Foreclosed Homes Are Cheaper

The biggest selling point of foreclosed homes is, of course, their marked-down price—often significantly lower from other similar properties in the same area (known as “comparables,” or “comps,” in broker-speak). Most foreclosures are sold at a sizable discount below market value, with the exact amount varying from region to region. Buyers may also take advantage of additional savings with perks such as reduced down payments, lower interest rates, or the elimination of appraisal fees and certain closing costs.

What makes these properties such a deal? If the residence is in the pre-foreclosure or short-sale stage, its owners are in a financial bind—and time is not on their side. They have to unload the property and get what they can while they can, before they lose possession of it. In short, these sellers aren’t negotiating from a position of strength and, while it may seem cruel to take advantage of others’ misfortune, buyers can benefit.

Buyers can benefit even more if the property has in fact been seized. The sheriff’s office isn’t interested in hanging onto a house, and banks don’t want to be in the landlord business. Financial institutions typically want to rid themselves of foreclosed properties promptly (for a reasonable price, of course—they have to answer to investors and auditors that they made every attempt to recoup as much of the original loan amount as possible). Again, buyers can take advantage of this situation. 

Finally, foreclosed homes are usually sold “as is”—if there’s damage, repairs by the owner aren’t part of the equation—and, as used-car and vintage furniture aficionados know, “as is” translates into a discount. Of course, "as is" can be a double-edged sword, as we’ll discuss below.

Risks of Buying Foreclosed Homes

The below-market price is the big plus of buying a foreclosed home. Nevertheless, these properties also carry their share of pitfalls.

Property problems

While it carries a compensatory discount, as-is condition can be pretty grim. If the home is still being occupied by the owners, it may be poorly maintained—if the people can’t make the mortgage payments, they could well be falling behind on paying for regular upkeep as well, not to mention major repairs. In addition, some folks who are facing or forced into foreclosure are embittered, and they take out their frustrations on their home before the bank repossesses. This often involves removing appliances and fixtures and sometimes even deliberate vandalism.

Hidden costs

Along with unforeseen repair and renovation work, delinquencies such as back taxes and liens—which auction properties often have attached to them, either by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) or state or other creditors—can add further costs to an otherwise desirable house. Whatever is owed, the government must first be paid and settled before the buying process can go forward. This applies mainly to properties being auctioned off; a bank will always pay off any liens attached to the property before reselling it to another party.

Slow process

The preceding complications often mean lots of paperwork. Typically, foreclosures will have a number of additional documents that have to be completed to prepare for the closing, which isn’t always so timely. If it’s a short-sale situation, the owner’s lender has to approve the deal, and that can take a while, as mentioned earlier. Serious damage found in the house can result in a lower home appraisal, which may affect the buyer’s ability to secure a loan. Some lenders won’t lend below a certain dollar amount, because the profit potential on a lesser loan isn’t worth the risk.

While you’d think a bank would be eager to unload a repossessed residence, response times between the bank and other involved parties can also be sluggish with REO properties. The amount of time that it takes to get a response on your bid can vary widely; if the bank holding your property is swamped with foreclosures, it can take a long time to process your request.

Banks with substantial backlogs have been known to take up to 90 days to respond to an offer. If you plan to finance the purchase, you’d be wise to spend the time obtaining preapproval for a mortgage.

Competition

As with any market, whenever there’s a chance to acquire something at a discount from the going rate, demand will soar. So increased interest and competition—not just from potential occupants but from investors and professional house flippers—are inevitable when dealing with worthwhile foreclosed properties.

Very often a foreclosed home can be priced attractively lower than other homes in the surrounding area. When word gets out, numerous offers can come in rapidly, and a bidding war ensues. So what was once a bargain can rapidly become a costly property.

Prospective buyers of foreclosed homes may be wise to submit bids on several properties at once because it is possible for competing buyers to secure a property with a higher bid or an all-cash offer. However, don’t get discouraged if someone else trumps your offer for a particular property; instead, check back periodically to see if it reappears in the bank’s inventory. Foreclosure deals tend to fall through quite often.

Purchasing a Foreclosed Home

If buying from a bank, you’ll need to sharpen your bargaining skills and start the process with a lowball offer on the property you want. Banks that have accumulated sizable inventories of foreclosed properties will be more inclined to negotiate on price. The longer the bank has held the property, the greater the odds that it will seriously consider low offers. You should probably make your initial bid at a price that’s at least 20% below the current market price—perhaps even more if the property you’re bidding on is located in an area with a high incidence of foreclosures.

If you can pay for the property and any necessary renovations in cash, you’re in an enviable position. That’s why some buyers decide to team up with outside investors who can help them out on the front end and share any profits when the home goes on the selling block once again. In fact, cash deals represent a sizable portion of REO sales.

Financing Options for Foreclosed Homes

You can use a mortgage to buy an REO property, though private lenders tend to be skittish about financing foreclosure deals. However, several government-sponsored financing options are available for those who qualify: (k) loans from the Federal Housing Administration (FHA), Fannie Mae’s HomePath ReadyBuyer program, and the HomeSteps program through Freddie Mac.

(k) loans

The FHA designed its (k) loans to help assuage the concerns of banks that would otherwise shy away from high-risk REO purchases. By charging borrowers a mortgage-insurance premium, the FHA is able to guarantee loans made by private lenders who participate in the program.

For borrowers, one of the big advantages is the ability to finance the home purchase, plus any required repairs, in a single mortgage. The more basic version, a streamlined (k) loan, is meant for limited repairs that don’t require engineering or architectural plans. Individuals can borrow up to $35, above the home’s sale price to cover basic remedies, such as new appliances, siding, and windows.

With more extensive fixes—such as building an addition or taking care of structural damage—a traditional (k) loan is usually the best option. Unlike the streamlined variant, homeowners must take out at least $5,; the maximum amount is based on FHA limits for each county. Additionally, you have to pay for an independent consultant to inspect the property and verify that the work meets program guidelines.

An additional drawback to these loans is the price. Besides paying mortgage insurance, borrowers typically pay interest rates that are a quarter of a percentage point higher than those on conventional loans. They may also have to fork over one or two points—upfront fees that are each worth 1% of the principal amount.

HomePath ReadyBuyer

The HomePath ReadyBuyer program offered by the Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA)—or Fannie Mae, as it’s affectionately known—is geared toward first-time buyers. After completing a mandatory homebuying education course, available to be taken online, participants can receive up to 3% in closing cost assistance toward the purchase of a foreclosed property owned by Fannie Mae.

This government-sponsored enterprise offers other breaks too; homebuyers may need to put up only $ in earnest money, for example, and private mortgage insurance may be canceled after your equity in the home reaches 20%.

HomeSteps

Freddie Mac provides liquidity to the mortgage market by buying loans from banks, pooling them, and selling them to investors as securities. With HomeSteps, the organization—through its private lending partners—offers special financing for those who want to buy only the foreclosed properties that it owns. HomeSteps is currently available only in the following states:

  • Alabama
  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • Illinois
  • Kentucky
  • North Carolina
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Virginia

If you happen to live in one of these states, HomeSteps has some significant benefits. Chief among them is that you don’t have to buy mortgage insurance, which sets it apart from (k) loans. That alone can save buyers hundreds if not thousands of dollars over the course of the mortgage. Furthermore, a HomeSteps mortgage doesn’t require an appraisal at origination, which can be a major hurdle for those seeking a conventional loan. Buyers can find a list of single-family, condo, and multifamily properties on the HomeSteps website.

The Bottom Line

On the surface, foreclosed homes can seem awfully appealing. However, costs can be highly unpredictable, and underlying damage could make a property undesirable. The buying process is often sluggish, which might spur second thoughts in the minds of some, while heavy demand for enticing foreclosed properties might push other hopeful purchasers away.

With all this being said, foreclosed homes can wind up being incredible deals. Buyers have the unique opportunity to pay below market value for homes that wouldn’t be available to them under normal circumstances. If there are savings on the acquisition side, it improves the likelihood of the buyer realizing appreciation of their asset, as well as investment gains if they sell in the future. If done responsibly, purchasing a foreclosed home can allow a buyer to reap a myriad of benefits for many years to come.

Sours: https://www.investopedia.com/investing/buying-foreclosed-home/
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Successful Foreclosure Investing Strategies

When it comes to trafficking in real estate, are foreclosures a good investment? They can be, but Investing in the foreclosure market is a strategy that requires a level of sophistication and diligence far beyond what most people realize. It has big potential, but it takes a great effort to cash in.

Key Takeaways

  • Investing in the foreclosure market can be lucrative, but it takes a lot of hard work.
  • Investors need well-thought-out strategies for why they're investing in the properties, how they will acquire them, and how they will use and/or dispose of them.
  • Investors must research the local real estate market and each property thoroughly, as well as state and local government standards and the strength of the business community.

Buying a Foreclosed Home: What to Know

Foreclosure investing should be approached as any significant investment, requiring focus, diligence, and careful research into local property, economic, and demographic trends. It also requires the formation of a strategy for acquiring properties and eventually selling them.

Foreclosure Investing Isn’t for Amateurs

Buying used cars at auction is similar to investing in foreclosed properties. Used car dealers are people who know all the makes and models as well as their common defects and the way to change them to create value. They take significantly less risk than the average person who attends the auction just to buy a car at a discount.

Many foreclosure buyers go to the auction on the courthouse steps with the hope of grabbing a bargain—the disparity between the auction price and the property’s intrinsic value. However, they may not have any serious knowledge of the investment itself or any risk-mitigation strategies. Investors well seasoned in the residential foreclosure market know that relying on price differential as the main source of investment income is a recipe for disaster.

The correct method for obtaining a foreclosure property is not the shotgun approach; instead, it involves selecting properties that are in a locale that is destined for redevelopment or improvement. The properties need to have distinct attributes that make them stand out from others in the local market or present some opportunity to create value.

Investment Strategies

Any investor in real estate should have a well-thought-out strategy that includes the goals and manner for acquiring the property, holding it, and eventually disposing of it. This strategy is even more critical when investing specifically in the foreclosure market. You must determine whether the foreclosure occurred as a result of some unfortunate circumstance related to the former owner or because of a broader trend that may affect the local market.

Investors need to do a significant amount of research on the local real estate market. The demand for properties is a function of population growth, job growth, disposable income growth, and demographic changes. It will greatly affect pricing as well as the ability to sell properties at the end of the investment period.

Research upcoming infrastructure development, such as roads, schools, and community projects. Also learn how the local and state government support business growth and plan to fix any particular issues, such as traffic, air quality, crime, and taxes. All of these items will make an area more desirable and increase the value of properties within it.

It can be a smart move to reach out to owners of properties destined for foreclosure before their homes go on the auction block.

Acquisition Strategies

Most investors have been taught to scour publications that list assets going to auction and then to correspond with owners about their intent to purchase the property before it goes on the auction block. Although deals can be obtained on the courthouse steps, finding alternative ways to secure distressed properties will greatly improve your chances of closing. It can also provide an opportunity to fully understand and analyze the property.

For example, let’s say an investor gains access to properties by using their contacts in the marketplace and knowledge of residential lending to help struggling homeowners negotiate with their lenders. If the loan problems are worked out, not only does the investor increase their reputation with both the owners and the lenders; the investor also may get referrals to others with problem loans. And if the situation can’t be worked out, the investor is the first in line to acquire the property, because they have gained the owners’ trust. Investors can also make an informed decision about whether to buy the property because they’ve learned about its drawbacks and benefits.

Another strategy is purchasing the distressed loans at a discount from the lenders. Banks and other lending institutions do not like acquiring foreclosures. To avoid taking on real estate owned (REO) properties, these institutions will often sell several nonperforming loans at a significant discount to par. Investors can be more flexible than the lenders in working out a nonperforming loan, sometimes turning it back into a performing loan that will command a much higher return, thanks to the investor’s lower basis in the investment. After seasoning the loans, investors can either hold them or sell them at a premium once the loans have been performing for some time.

In the event that the loans cannot be worked out, the investor can foreclose on the property and take the title without having to compete with any other parties. The only downside to this approach is that buying a pool of loans requires a larger capital outlay than buying individual properties at auction. The point is that there are creative ways to reduce the competition in acquiring a nonperforming asset.

Owning Strategies

Investors should also be sure of what to do once the asset is acquired. Will the property be “flipped” back into the market, or will it be held and seasoned awaiting a market change before sale?

Flipping Properties

Investors considering buying foreclosures and then remarketing them shortly after purchase should find ways to improve the property. Those that provide the greatest bang for the buck include adding bedrooms and bathrooms, remodeling kitchens, and finishing basements or other unused spaces.

As property transaction information is public knowledge, some prospective buyers will be wary of paying a premium for a property immediately after a foreclosure sale, even if its price is in line with other properties in the area. Creating value through redevelopment helps provide a rationale for the higher resale price and can reduce the risk of long marketing periods. However, investors should be wary of improving the property so much that its price is considerably higher than neighboring properties.

It’s a bad idea to improve a foreclosed home so much that you price it out of the market.

Holding Properties

Another strategy is to hold assets as rental properties until something happens in the marketplace to enhance property values. Investors must be sufficiently aware of the rental market to be confident that there is an adequate amount of demand for rental space and the property will generate enough rent to cover the cost of maintaining it.

For those who can handle the additional time and effort that it requires to be a landlord, buying distressed properties at a discount and converting them to rental properties can create significant wealth. The ability to get attractive financing, such as interest-only loans, in concert with the deductibility of mortgage interest from income taxes, can provide a way to create cash flow while waiting for the right time to sell.

Although residential real estate is not as volatile as other asset classes, it is characterized by long periods of low returns and then a spike in the value corresponding to some major change in demand that explains a significant portion of return. Again, this is the impetus for ongoing research and a holding-period strategy that will help estimate the timing of the value jump and create a plan for the asset in preparation for sale.

Exit Strategies

Not having thought through an exit strategy is a big mistake that new investors commonly make. Many are under the false impression that the best time to invest in foreclosure properties is when there is an abundance of them available. Actually, a significant increase in homes for sale and foreclosure properties underscores some problem that is preventing people from paying their loans or making them unwilling to keep their homes. This could be due to the loss of jobs in the area or some infrastructure problem that makes the area undesirable.

Those trends will have a positive impact on the supply of available homes for sale or foreclosures and a negative impact on demand. This means that it will be more difficult to sell the property until the market fundamentals improve.

A common mistake made by investors who rely solely on the pricing differential for their profit is that they fail to realize the negative impact of carrying costs. Expenses can include mortgage payments, taxes, insurance, and maintenance during a protracted marketing and sales period.

Setting a deadline to sell a property and then discounting the price until the property sells is one way to avoid excess carrying costs. It is much better to sell at a small-to-zero profit than to continue to offer a property at a price that will ensure a long marketing period, which will pile up carrying costs that can lead to losses.

The Bottom Line

Investing in nonperforming real estate assets to build wealth is a viable strategy, but it’s not a way to get rich quick. For every rags-to-riches story, there are 10 more people who have lost their capital because they did not keep abreast of changes in market trends. 

Those who succeed in the foreclosure market have studied the strategies and tactics of other successful investors. They have put the time and resources into making the appropriate market contacts needed to create a competitive advantage over others. Still, pouring time and energy into getting to know the local real estate market is only one of several strategies that investors can use to get a leg up on the competition. Success comes from smart, carefully crafted, and executed acquisition and exit strategies.

Sours: https://www.investopedia.com/articles/mortgages-real-estate/08/investing-in-foreclosures.asp
Foreclosed Properties: Maganda bang Mag-invest Dito?

15 Best Foreclosure Sites for Finding Properties

You may remember that foreclosures were a big part of the Great Recession. As the economy cratered, foreclosure filings soared. In the first half of alone, million U.S. homes spun into foreclosure, according to data from ATTOM Data Solutions, a property database provider.

10 years later, will the COVID pandemic lead to a rash of foreclosures? That could spell a lot of hardship, but also an opportunity for investors to flip homes for profit as more American workers switch to full-time remote work, often in less-expensive cities and towns.

Ongoing efforts to ease the pandemic's economic impact – including the CARES Act -- have slowed the foreclosure process, particularly for properties where mortgages were federally backed. But that stay doesn't apply to lenders or servicers of loans not backed by the government (though state laws may).

Buying and flipping foreclosed homes might be a path to consider if you are building a home-selling business.It follows the maxim of buy low, sell high: buy a foreclosed home on the cheap, make the needed improvements, and sell at or above the market value.

Nearly 11, American properties received a foreclosure filing – default notices, bank repossessions or scheduled auctions – in October, up 20% from September. The states with the highest foreclosure rates in October were South Carolina, Nebraska, Alabama, Louisiana, and Florida, according to ATTOM Data Solutions.

Seeking foreclosure homes near you? Check with your county, town or city. They may have foreclosure websites or other means of listing local foreclosures. But there is a wide range of online resources for finding foreclosures, including most larger banks (we’ve listed a few):

Foreclosure listings - free sites

Equator.com. Equator offers free listings of homes in foreclosure alongside short sales, open-market listings, and properties available through the Hubzu auction process. 

HomePath.com. Owned by the Federal National Mortgage Association, known as Fannie Mae, HomePath.com offers free listings of thousands of homes in foreclosure being sold by Fannie Mae. 

HomeSteps.com. This site is owned by Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, or Freddie Mac. It lists homes in foreclosure that Freddie Mac is selling to investors or potential home buyers.

Zillow Foreclosure Center. The popular website used by home sellers and buyers alike has its own search site for foreclosure listings. You can fashion your own method of searching, filtering by cost or location.

Realtor.com Foreclosures. Similarly, Realtor.com, also used by new-home seekers or sellers, can help you find foreclosures. You can focus your search using a zip code and/or city. And, while we're on the subject of Realtors, you can also check with local real estate companies and their agents directly to search for foreclosed homes.

Wells Fargo REO Properties. Note that these properties are not sold directly by Wells Fargo. You must contact the listing agents or other contact associated with the property.

CitiMortage. This site lists properties or foreclosures that are owned by Citigroup. Potential buyers contact the listing agent associated with the property they are interested in.

Bank of America foreclosures. This site allows users to search for real estate owned or bank owned foreclosed properties, by zip code or other methods.

Foreclosure listings – subscription sites

RealtyTrac. There’s a free 7-day trial; after that, it’s $ a month, with discounts on multi-month packages. Members get access to RealtyTrac’s proprietary information, including auctions dates and locations, pre-foreclosure addresses, owner information, bank loan amounts and more.

Foreclosure.com. After the free 7-day trial, it’s $ per month. Subscribers receive detailed information on the listed properties, tax roll data, files provided by the lender, local school districts and other listing details.

Foreclosure listings – government sites

HUD.gov. Potential investors and other home buyers can find one-to-four unit residential properties that the Department of Housing and Urban Development acquired from foreclosure actions on FHA-insured mortgages.

HomeSales.gov. Another federal government website for hunting down foreclosures is HomeSales.gov. These, of course, are previously owned single-family homes that landed in the federal government’s hands by public auction or other method. Purchasers must work with a real estate agent, broker or servicing representative to submit an offer or bid, according to the website.

FHA Single Family Real Estate Owned Properties. This site is for the U.S, Department of Housing and Urban Development and includes real estate owned properties. These single family homes land on the site when the Federal Housing Administration pays a claim to a bank or other lending institution on a foreclosed property that was originally financed with an FHA insured mortgage. 

USDA-RD/FSA Properties. The United State Department of Agriculture-Rural Development and the USDA-Farm Service Agency list properties on this website. Here, you’ll find a small number of single- and multi-family homes, farms, and ranches. Buyers must work with a real estate agent or broker to put in a bid, which means there will be a commission to pay. 

IRS Seizures. This Internal Revenue Service website is a portal to finding homes and other property seized by the tax agency for nonpayment of federal taxes.

Sours: https://www.kiplinger.com/business/small-business//best-foreclosure-sites-for-finding-properties

Homes sale foreclosed for

48 Foreclosures & Foreclosed Homes For Sale in Atlanta, GA

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Foreclosed Properties: Maganda bang Mag-invest Dito?

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Feeling that the stomach resists and no longer fit, the snake took out the phallus, took its tail closer to the tip and inserted it into the ass, inserted. It deeply, like a plug, stepped back a little and, clasping its phallus, guiding it, continued to pour out, covering its back and wings with sperm dragon. He stepped back a couple of steps, picked up the tail of the second dragon and began to whip it, hurting both of them.

From a strong blow, Shetesh could not resist on the dragon's back, both fell to one side. The serpent continued to whip and poured out aimingly.



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