2008 audi a4 spark plugs

2008 audi a4 spark plugs DEFAULT

Audi B7 A4 Quattro T Spark Plugs

Iridium Spark Plugs - Set Of Four

Long lasting Iridium alternative to OE Platinum core plugs

Brand:
NGK - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
BKR7EIX4CLY

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Iridium Spark Plugs - Set Of Four

Long lasting Iridium alternative to OE Platinum core plugs - One heat range colder plug, beneficial to performance turbo applications One heat range colder plug, beneficial to performance turbo applications

Brand:
NGK - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
BKR8EIXKT

$

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Platinum Spark Plugs - Set Of Four

High quality OE styled laser platinum spark plugs

Brand:
NGK - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
KT

Double Platinum Spark Plugs - Set Of Four

Popular Bosch alternative to factory NGK plugs

Brand:
Bosch - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:

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Platinum Spark Plugs - Set Of Four

Platinum cored plugs featuring a cooler heat range ideal for chip tuned vehicles

Brand:
NGK - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
PFR7B4CYL

Extended 5/8" Magnetic Spark Plug Socket

The perfect tool for deeply recessed 5/8-inch spark plugs

Brand:
Schwaben - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
S
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Brisk Silver Racing DR12S Spark Plug - Set Of Four

Featuring silver fine wire center electrode - Superior ignition ability increases engine power! One heat range colder than stock with a non-projected tip

Brand:
Brisk - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
DR12SKT

Spark Plugs - Set Of Four

Keep your engine running smooth with factory recommended plugs

Brand:
Genuine Volkswagen Audi - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
B-4

Spark Plug Socket 16MM 12 Point Swivel

Swivel Spark Plug Socket 16MM

Brand:
CTA Tools - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
CTA

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Copper Spark Plugs - Set Of Four

Copper cored plugs featuring a cooler heat range ideal for chip tuned vehicles

Brand:
NGK - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
BKR7EKT1

$

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Ignition Service Tools

Remove ignition coils and spark plugs without damaging them

Brand:
Schwaben - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
ICKT

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Brisk Silver Racing DR10S Spark Plug - Priced Each

Featuring silver fine wire center electrode - Superior ignition ability increases engine power! Two heat ranges colder than stock with a non-projected tip

Brand:
Brisk - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
DR10S

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Extended Spark Plug Socket

3/8" drive socket with 5/8" opening for most spark plugs

Brand:
Sunex - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
SUU

$

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Brisk Silver Racing DR14YS Spark Plug - Set Of Four

Featuring silver fine wire center electrode - Superior ignition ability increases engine power! Stock heat range with a projected tip

Brand:
Brisk - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
DR14YSKT

V-Power Spark Plugs - Set Of Four

Factory heat range plugs with copper cores

Brand:
NGK - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
BKR6E4KT

$

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Spark Plug Socket 12" x 5/8" - Bavarian Autosport

Magnetic insert holds the spark plug securely in place for easy installation.

Brand:
Bav Auto Tools - Corporate Logo
ES#:
Mfg#:
B
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Sours: https://www.ecstuning.com/Audi-B7_A4-QuattroT/Engine/Ignition/Spark_Plugs/

Thread: B7 A4 T Spark Plugs Replacement Guide v

DIAGNOSIS OF A USED SPARK PLUG

Normal
Light grey or tan deposits and slight electrode erosion


Carbon Fouling
Dry, soft black carbon on the insulator and electrodes

Symptoms:
  • Poor starting
  • Misfiring
  • Faulty acceleration

Causes:
  • Faulty choke - over rich air/fuel mixture
  • Delayed ignition timing
  • Bad ignition leads
  • Plug heat range too cold


Pre-Ignition
A melted or burned center and/or ground electrode, blistered insulator and aluminum or other metallic deposits on the insulator

Symptoms:
  • Loss of power causing engine damage
  • Pre-ignition occurs when combustion begins before the timed spark occurs

Causes:
  • Plug insufficiently tightened
  • Engine insufficiently cooled
  • Ignition timing too advanced
  • Plug heat range too hot


Over Heating
An extremely white insulator with small black deposits and premature electrode erosion

Symptoms:
  • Loss of power at high-speed or during heavy load

Causes:
  • Plug insufficiently tightened
  • Engine insufficiently cooled
  • Ignition timing too advanced
  • Plug heat range too hot


Mechanical Damage
Bent electrode and a broken insulator, dents often present on electrode

Symptoms:

Causes:
  • Plug nose is too long for engine head
  • Foreign object (bolt/nut) in combustion chamber

Oil Fouling
Wet, oily black deposits on the insulator and electrodes

Symptoms:

Causes:
  • Wrong piston rings, cylinders, and valve guides
  • Fuel mixture oil content too high


Broken Insulator
Insulator is cracked or split

Symptoms:

Causes:
  • Severe detonation
  • Incorrect tool/torque applied during installation or removal
  • Careless gap setting


Torched Seat
Melted in the thread and seat area of the plug housing

Symptoms:
  • Loss of power causing engine damage

Causes:
  • Plug insufficiently tightened


WHICH SPARK PLUG IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Auto makers built their cars to be maintenence-free, and no prudent consumer in their right mind would buy a car with plugs that you have to change every miles these days (unless it was a hand-me-down used car). Most modern day vehicles will use iridium, while most are using platinums.

Platinum plugs (and Iridiums) were introduced to provide longevity (60kk+) to vehicles compared to copper plugs which foul after miles, but they do NOT dissapate heat fast enough (which leads to pre-ignition/detonation) and do NOT provide a "better spark" like they have claimedwith their "fine-wire electrode" (which only causes problems).

Copper is one of the best conductors of electricity and heat, but they just plain dont last. Using Platinum and Iridium plugs, the center electrode (fine-wire) thin, that under high boost, they get so hot, they will begin to "heat glow" and cause premature ignition in the combustion cycle (pre-ignition => detonation) unless they were properly designed to pull the heat. This is a problem for all of us turbo guys running high boost. Copper on the other hand, has a much thicker center electrode, on top of that, the copper material is able to dissapate heat from the combustion chamber fast enough to keep the combustion temperatures lower. Coppers use thicker electrodes simply based on the fact that they can easily jump the spark, whereas platinum and iridiums will require a fine wire to better direct the spark to prevent missfires.

Remember the two primary functions of a spark plug:

1) To efficiently ignite the A/F mixture without mis-fires (Gap, etc)
2) To pull heat from the combustion chamber into the head, where the cooling system should dissapate that heat. (Heat Range)

With those two in mind, coppers will work much better in these environments. For those thinking: "What If I just simple use a colder Platinum plug?" Well, for the kind of boost our A4's make with the Krispy-Kreme K03's, we will reach EGT's of over degrees C (keeping in mind that pre-ignition can start to occur at around degrees C). Once those colder platinums reach preignition temperature, it will take them FOREVER to dissapate that amount of heat (with the details about the material/design I mentioned above). A platinum/Iridium plug in a colder heat range usually runs just as hot as a copper in the standard heat range when under high stress. So many people will use a Platinum/Iridum plug TWO steps colder to counter that. But using a plug that is 2 steps colder, will lead to two things:

1) More prone to carbon-fouling on "normal driving" where EGT's are kept low. (Plugs must stay above C Deg to burn off excess carbon deposits to "self-clean")
2) As a result, loss of horsepower from a less efficient/inhibited spark.

You need a plug that is actually "hot enough" to ignite the A/F mixture as hot as possible to get the most efficient combustion, as well as burn off carbon-deposits (~C deg), and yet cold enough to prevent pre-ignition when compression is high (< C Deg).


Quick cross-reference guide for all the plugs listed above in heat range:
(VW/Audi Factory heat range in bold)

NGK - | 5 | 6 | 7| 8 | 9 |
Denso - | 18 | 20 | 22| 24 | 27 |
Bosch - | 8 | 7 | 6| 5 | 4 |
Champion - | 11,12 | 9,10 | 7,8| 61,63 | 59 |

OEM Range- Stock car with stock boost/timing, or mildly-tuned car in cold climates.

Recommended plugs in this heat range:
  • NGK FR7S8EG (OE Platinum)
  • Bosch FR6KPPS (OE Platinum)
  • Bosch F6DTC (Tri-Electrode)
  • NGK BKR7E (Copper)
  • NGK BKR7EIX (Iridium version of the same plug above)
  • Denso K22R (Copper)
  • Denso IK22 (Iridium version of the same plug above)

One Step Colder- Cars with basic performance upgrade (chip/intake/exhaust) - k03, k04, etc.

Recommended plugs in this heat range:
  • NGK BKR8E (Copper)
  • NGK BKR8EIX (Iridium Version of the same plug above)
  • NGK RA-8 (Copper, Non-Resistor plug)
  • Denso K24R (Copper)
  • Denso IK24 (Iridium Version of the same plug above)
  • Bosch FR5DTC (Tri-Electrode)
  • Bosch F5DP0R (Platinum/Side Fire)**

Two Steps Colder- Cars with bigger turbos will benefit from these, whereas a regularly chipped car may foul these.

Recommended plugs in this heat range:
  • Champion C59YC (Copper)
  • NGK BKR9EIX (Iridium)
  • Denso IK27 (Iridium)

**- Many members have found real good luck with the Bosch F5DPOR's, this is why:

Despite all the "con's" about platinums (poor conductivity, poor heat dissapation qualities), the engineers at Bosch has managed to engineer the F5DPOR's so that they are still able to fire the A/F as well as pull away enough heat. The F5DPOR's unlike conventional plugs, use a "Side-Fire" technology, where instead of a standard "projected" electrode into the combustion chamber, the ground electrode was placed on the edge of the plug so that it fires closer to the flame kernel. By doing so, the F5DPOR's are able to still keep a thick center electrode (to pull heat away faster) without having to go with a smaller electrode in order to fire. The F5DPOR's heat range is also equavalent to that of a NGK #8 (TWO steps colder than stock), in order to give the same effect as a #7. But because it is a platinum plug and not copper, they will not foul "as" easily where a copper would have. Because of these two important attributes, Bosch was able to use these plugs to both last like other platinums (up to 60k), while still function under more extreme environments. Platinums however, still do not compare to iridiums in longevity, as well as heat/electro conductivity.

QUESTIONS & ANSWERS SECTION


Question:
QuoteOriginally Posted by jimrobbingtonView Post

How cheap are the copper plugs? Can you actually feel a difference in performance?

Answer:
QuoteOriginally Posted by kristokesView Post
I got mine for $3 each so $12 for a set of For that price, it's worth trying them out yourself
Question:
QuoteOriginally Posted by jimrobbingtonView Post

Also, do you recommend a gap on the coppers?

Answer:
QuoteOriginally Posted by kristokesView Post
I gapped the plugs from it's specs (") to " (do not go over). The minute I fired up the car, the exhaust tone became a LOT deeper. So I took the car around the block, then on the highway doing some MPH pulls - the car became a LOT smoother! The powerband of the turbo will now make boost past RPM and the spool-up became noticeably quicker. The hesitation I used to experience at RPM disappeared and the idle became a lot smoother.

By simply switching spark plugs, I would say that my "butt-dyno" pretty much felt another hp difference in power.
Question:
QuoteOriginally Posted by matthewbView Post

Stock gap is right? is recommended for tuned cars. Or is the opposite true?

Answer:
QuoteOriginally Posted by kristokesView Post

Well it depends on what you mean by stock but coming straight from the factory, our OEM spark plugs are actually UNDER-GAPPED at ". Since OEM spark plugs were made for longevity (~50k+ miles), they were set at a lower gap because the gap will eventually get bigger through time and wear on the electrodes.

IMHO from personal experience, I believe a " gap is optimal for our cars.

Since I currently use NGK spark plugs on my B7A4 and quite familiar with them, let's go over what to look for and what to set the gaps at when using NGK as an example (the same concept can be applied to other brand spark plugs)

This is how NGK's numbering system typically works:
Most NGK spark plugs you find at your local auto parts store end with a (-xx) after the part number; which signifies a pre-gap.

For example, if you got a set of BKR7E's (although those are very hard to find), the denotes a mm or " pre-gap. A BKR7E-8 would be a mm or " pre-gap, and so forth.. However, part numbers that do NOT have a (-xx) such as BKR7E will indicate the default gap of " (basically a "). So do NOT get that confused.

Many people who use the BKR6E's often buy the BKR6E's instead since it's OEM recommended for many vehicles, which comes with a HUGE gap of mm or ". In order for it to work properly with the gap you want ("), you need to bang the crap out of the ground strap just to make ". But by then, the strap is already crooked and bent. This will lead to more mis-fires and pre-mature wear. You typically want a spark plug that's pre-gapped as close as possible to your desired gap - best way to keep the center and ground electrodes parallel.

A general rule of thumb:
Always stay within a +/- " gap range when re-gapping. Basically, a " plug should be gapped no less than " and no more than ". (This applies to most plugs using a single ground electrode strap. Multi-electrode straps are a different beast that I'm sadly not familiar with.)

QuoteOriginally Posted by [email protected]View Post
UPDATE:


We noticed right away when we started the development on our JHM T Tuning some months back that my A4 was being a bit hesitant and misfiring as soon as the car would start boosting above 10psi. Our first instinct was that there was an issue with my spark plugs based on our years of firsthand experience with turbo Audis in our shop. After removing my spark plugs, we checked the gap and they were all at which is why I was getting the misfire. The plugs that came out of my car were Denso PK20PR11 plugs, and looking at their website it shows that those are the plugs that Denso recommends for the B7 A4 T, yet they come at their recommended gapped of However, Audi recommends that the plugs be gapped at which is quite different than a gap, so always make sure your plugs are at the right gap before you install them as whoever installed these plugs in the car before I purchased it, did not. The increased gap over stock (recommended is by Audi) adds more resistance for the coil to fire across the gap. This is okay sometimes when boost levels are stock since the engineers have to factor in spark plug wear. However when you add boost it increases the resistance to jump the gap and it is just like increasing your gap even more, hence the misfires. My car most likely would have been okay if the installer of the Denso plugs would have regapped them to spec. However we do not believe in using plugs that aren’t a close to stock gap since they were most likely engineered for a non-boosted application.

Denso Plug:



I replaced my Denso Spark Plugs with the OEM Bosch Spark Plugs we have on our website HERE!I made sure they were gapped at prior to install for our tuning development purposes. This was because we have to make sure that everything is functioning % perfect at the stock plug gap for those people who would be purchasing the tune and still on their original plugs (I know the gap size will increase over time as they get used, however we have seen quite a few very low mileage Ts). Needless to say we would have been okay with the off the shelf gap of , but they would have gap less to work with as they wore down with mileage.

Spark plugs are essentially the center of your car’s ability to run and make power. When you increase your boost, you are increasing your cylinder pressure which makes your coil packs have to work harder to jump the given gap. The shorter gap will also help insure a better fire with more consistency. Considering that your plugs can fire over times a second, making sure that you keep the best gap for your application is a must. That way you will always have a proper burn and not have a spark plug caused misfire. That being said, a (Factory spec) gap is going to be much less strain on the coil packs/motor than , hence why I was misfiring when my cylinder pressure increased.

In addition, the spark plug works as a heat exchanger by pulling the unwanted thermal energy from the combustion chamber. The heat range given to a spark plug defines the spark plugs ability to dissipate the heat. Both Bosch and NGK are popular spark plug manufacturers and their heat range designations both utilize a number between 1 and 10 and are often times confused with each other. NGK goes down a number every time the heat range gets HOTTER and Bosch goes down a number every time the heat range gets COLDER. For the T the OEM Heat Range for NGK is “7” and the lower the number for NGK, the hotter the heat range is (like stated previously). For example, the BKR6E is going to be hotter than the BKR7E. The OEM Heat Range for Bosch is “6” and the lower the number, the colder it is (like stated previously). For example, the F5DPOR is going to be a colder plug than the F6DTC. The rate of heat transfer for the spark plug is determined by a few things; the length of the insulator nose, gas volume around the insulator nose, the material of the center electrode, and the construction of the porcelain insulator. Keep in mind, the spark plugs heat range has no relationship to the actual voltage that is being transferred through the spark plug!

There is a lot of information to take in to understand sparkplugs, and at time can be quite confusing. That is why we have done the research for you and are here to supply you with the correct sparkplugs for your application.



OEM Replacement Spark Plugs:

There are two different spark plugs that came in the B7 A4 T. Therefor both choices will be a direct replacement for your vehicle. We have had great experiences with both of these manufactures and choice will ultimately come down to preference.

Bosch - FR6KPPS Long Life Platinum (Heat range 6)



Click HEREfor more information!


NGK - PFR7S8EG Laser Platinum (Heat range 7)



Click HEREfor more information!


Higher Boost Applications:

The following plugs are pre gapped at a perfect width to keep misfires away on high boost applications. We use these plugs in our race cars and customer’s cars with great success.

Bosch - F5DPOR Platinum Sidefire (Heat range 5, one heat range colder than stock)



Click HEREfor more information!


Bosch - FR5DTC Tri-Electrode (Heat range 5, one heat range colder than stock)



Click HEREfor more information!

Bosch - F6DTC Tri-Electrode (Heat range 6, same heat range as stock) Note: This is a good lower cost replacement for stock cars or cars mostly stock with just a tune.




Click HEREfor more information!

NOTE:The spark plug torque spec is 30nm or 22 Ft-lbs. Remember to use Anti-Seize on the threads for easy removal and corrosion protection.


If you have any questions please feel free to ask. I am here to help!



Jake
Sours: https://www.audizine.com/forum/
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Get the Best Priced Audi A4 Spark Plugs

Spark Plugs available for the following Audi A4 years: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , 20, 19, 18, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11, 10, 09, 08, 07, 06, 05, 04, 03, 02, 01, 00, 99, 98, 97, This part is also sometimes called Audi A4 Spark Plug. We stock spark plugs parts for most Audi models including A4 Quattro, A6 Quattro, A8 Quattro, S4, Q7, Allroad Quattro, TT Quattro, Q5, S5, A6, S6, A3, A5 Quattro, Quattro, TT, S8, RS4, 90 Quattro, RS6, A7 Quattro, A3 Quattro, Cabriolet, , V8 Quattro, Coupe Quattro, Quattro, Quattro, A5, RS7, 80 Quattro, A4 allroad, 90, SQ5, , R8, 80, Quattro, , Coupe and Q3.

Audi A4 Spark Plugs Reviews

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Audi A4 Rough Idle.. Spark Plugs and Coil Packs

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AUDI B7/B8/B9 Horsepower Loss -HowTo Read Your Spark Plugs Color And Know If You Are Loosing Power

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