Honda civic head gasket symptoms

Honda civic head gasket symptoms DEFAULT

 

One of the most common critical engine problems is the blown head gasket. If your Honda Civic has blown its head gasket, you may find it running poorly or not at all.  Below you’ll find the symptoms, causes, and price of a Honda Civic head gasket.

A head gasket’s job is to create a seal between the engine block and the head(s). Outside of this job, it needs to fail before the head cracks or warps.  If the head gets damaged, the repair becomes much more costly. 

Blown Head Gasket Honda Civic

It should be noted that when you blow the head gasket, the head itself may be warped or cracked.  If you do the head gasket replacement yourself, you should take it to a reputable machine shop and have it tested.  Even if it looks perfectly fine to the naked eye, it still could be damaged.  Otherwise, you’ll go through all of the trouble of replacing it (it’s never a quick or easy job) only to find out that the head needs to come back off and be replaced.  Here’s a good YouTube video on how to tell if your head or block is cracked.

 

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Civic Bad Head Gasket Symptoms

Civic Bad Head Gasket Causes

Civic Head Gasket Repair Cost

 

 

Blown Head Gasket Symptoms: Honda Civic

Honda Civic Bad Head Gasket Symptoms

Most of the symptoms of a blown head gasket are obvious, since the way that the engine runs is usually affected.  Here are some of the most common signs of a blown head gasket:

  • Rough/Choppy Idle- When a head gasket blows, it will lower the effective compression ratio of one or more cylinders. This is always most noticeable at idle speed.
  • Loss of Power– A blown head gasket can leave your Civic feeling sluggish at speed.
  • “Milky” Oil– Depending on how bad and where the head gasket has broken, engine coolant can mix with the oil. This is a very serious concern. Oil that is too this can lock the motor up and leave you stranded.
  • White Smoke from Exhaust– A certain amount of white smoke is completely acceptable. But, if you feel that it has greatly changed recently don’t ignore it.  Related:  White Exhaust Smoke Diagnosis: Honda Civic
  • Loss of Coolant– If your Civic’s engine coolant level is going down, but there is no noticeable leak, it could be a sign that the head gasket has blown.

 

Honda Civic Blown Head Gasket Causes

While there are many reasons that your Civic’s head gasket can fail, the most common ones have to do with the cooling system causing the engine to overheat.  

  • Low Engine Coolant– If there is not enough coolant to properly cool the engine, it’ll overheat and blow the head gasket. Low engine coolant can be both the cause and a symptom of a blown head gasket.
  • Bad Thermostat–  The thermostats job is to regulate the flow of coolant in and out of your Civic’s engine.  When it refuses to open, the engine can get hot enough that it’ll crack a head or blow a head gasket.
  • Poor Coolant Flow–  If there is not enough coolant flowing through the engine, it’ll overheat.  This could be due to a bad radiator, radiator hoses, or water pump.  
  • Head Gasket Failure–  It’s not uncommon for some vehicle makes and models to have head gaskets that just fail for no other reason than bad engineering.

 

Civic Head Gasket Repair Cost

Head gaskets themselves are very affordable. It’s the labor involved with getting them replaced that will get you.

With engines that have overhead cams, it’s can be an incredibly arduous task. It’s a bit easier with traditional engines that have the camshaft in the block.

With parts and labor, the average head gasket price is north of $1200. They can be significantly more depending on the model year and engine.  

If you plan on tackling the job yourself, start at the beginning of the weekend, and make sure that you use a torque wrench when putting everything together.

 

Conclusion

Replacing a head gasket on your own can be time consuming and challenging, but it can save you a lot of money.  If there is anything that you’d like to add, please feel free to leave a comment below.  Good luck diagnosing your Honda Civic!

Categories Honda CivicSours: https://www.700r4transmissionhq.com/honda-civic-blown-head-gasket/

Honda vehicles have an excellent reputation for reliability, with many drivers recommending them as ideal used cars due to their models often having plenty of life left in them beyond the 100,000 miles mark.

However, Honda vehicles are not without their engine problems – particularly the popular Honda Civic.

Honda Civic head gasket problems are common

Close-up of a 1.4l Honda petrol engine under the hood of a 2004 Honda Civic.

Unfortunately, the Honda Civic seems to suffer head gasket problems all too often. In particular, the 7th generation (2000-2005) Honda Civics with 1.2 and 1.5L engines have a reputation for blowing their head gaskets.

Whether this is down to a manufacturer defect isn’t quite clear, but the most common failure allows combustion gases into the cooling system. This gas displaces the coolant, forcing it into the overflow tank and preventing the coolant from cooling the engine.

If you don’t quickly notice a drop in coolant then this can soon cause issues and major damage to the Honda Civic’s engine. On average, a Honda Civic head gasket replacement costs between $980 and $1,260 – a real hit to the wallet if you don’t expect it!

How to identify symptoms of a blown head gasket in Honda Civics and other models

Civics aren’t the only Hondas susceptible to head gasket issues – we’ve also treated Honda Accords and Honda CR-Vs for similar issues over the years. Fortunately, the common symptoms of a blown head gasket in a Honda Civic, or any Honda for that matter, are usually the same for any vehicle:

  • Coolant levels dropping quicker than normal
  • Constantly needing to top up the radiator with water or coolant
  • Increased engine running temperature
  • Cloud of exhaust fumes when idling, or white smoke coming from exhaust
  • Coolant clearly leaking onto the ground beneath the head gasket
  • Bubbles in the radiator and reservoir overflow
  • Milky discoloration of the oil

As soon as you notice any of these symptoms, you need to grab yourself a reliable head gasket sealer to prevent costly head gasket repairs.

Which is the best head gasket sealer for Honda vehicles?

A specialist head gasket sealer and radiator leak repair, K-Seal is designed to prevent head gasket, coolant and radiator leaks in your Honda by sealing up:

  • Holes up to 0.635mm / 0.025in in diameter
  • Cracks up to 0.254mm / 0.01in wide by 12.7mm / 0.5in in length

Unlike other head gasket sealers on the market, K-Seal only requires you to shake your bottle, pour the contents into the radiator or header/expansion tank and leave the engine idling so it can work its way through the system to seal leaks and cracks in your engine.

It really is that simple – and why so many of our customers agree that K-Seal is the best head gasket sealer for Honda vehicles.

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A coolant leak could also be the cause of your Honda’s engine problems

Coolant leaks in Honda Accords and Honda CR-Vs are a common complaint. Honda Odyssey coolant leaks are also not unheard of.

However, the worst issues occur in the 2006-2009 Civic models. Prone to coolant leaks, overheating and complete engine failure, this is all due to cracks in the engine block. This prompted Honda to recall a number of vehicles and extend their warranty for these models to increase customer confidence in the model.

If you are out of warranty then potentially having to repair your engine block could cost thousands. Fortunately, K-Seal can fix coolant leaks and cracked engine blocks with ease.

A satisfied customer review: 1 bottle of K-Seal fixed the cracked block in his Honda Civic
Pick up a bottle of K-Seal today

Could other parts of my Honda’s engine be affected?

K-Seal is designed as a head gasket sealer and radiator leak repair, so obviously it’s best suited to fixing coolant leaks, radiator problems or blown head gaskets. But there’s plenty of other issues Hondas can suffer from.

Honda CR-Vs owners complain of stalled engines

Dating back to early 2017, owners have regularly complained to Honda about this SUV stalling for no apparent reason.

Mechanics and dealers have diagnosed this as being a fault with fuel leaking into the oil, with many owners opting to get the oil changed as a stopgap solution. Honda even ended up recalling 380,000 CR-Vs and Civics in China in February 2018 due to this issue, but no permanent solution seems to have been found.

K-Seal unfortunately can’t fix this issue, so it’s best to head to your nearest dealer if you’re suffering similar problems.

Knowing your Honda’s engine could make all the difference

No matter the model of your Honda, the best way to help diagnose your engine problem is to understand your engine.

Select an engine part in the interactive diagram below to explore a typical car engine and the important components that keep everything ticking over.

Still not sure what the problem is? Try our 60 second problem solver to quickly diagnose any issues.

Repair Your Honda’s Head Gasket Permanently With K-Seal

Sours: https://www.kseal.com/expert-advice/engine-problems/honda
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Symptoms of a Blown Head Gasket

At Pat Peck Honda, we’re here to help Gulfport, Long Beach, and Biloxi, MS, motorists with their service and repair needs. If you suspect issues with your head gasket, we want to help you identify whether that is indeed the problem. Let’s look at the symptoms of a blown head gasket.

We’ll review the most common signs and help you see how to fix a blown gasket. If you have questions, reach out to our certified service technicians today!

Can You Still Drive a Car with a Blown Head Gasket?

The real question is this: Is it safe to drive a car with a blown head gasket? The answer: an emphatic no. A blown head gasket is a serious engine problem that should be repaired as soon as possible. You might be able to drive to your local service center, but we don’t recommend driving beyond that.

A blown or cracked head gasket can cause coolant to escape from your engine—or possibly enter your cylinders. In the former situation, you’re at risk of an overheated engine. In the latter situation, severe engine damage is also a possibility.

Most head gaskets don’t blow right away but start as small leaks. When you notice a blown gasket, you should schedule service immediately.

Symptoms of a Blown Head Gasket

The symptoms of a blown head gasket aren’t always obvious. If you notice these signs, however, have your head gasket checked as soon as possible…

  • Misfire on startup with a puff of white exhaust: This could indicate a leak from the cooling system into the cylinder.
  • Overheating caused by a restricted radiator
  • Blue exhaust smoke
  • Discolored fluids

You may also notice coolant leaking into your engine oil. The mixture of the two looks frothy—you might compare it to a latte in terms of color. Alternatively, oil-contaminated coolant may be a symptom. It can form a mayonnaise-like film that you may find on the radiator cap.

How to Fix a Blown Head Gasket

The easiest way to fix a blown head gasket is to purchase a new cylinder head gasket to replace the one that has failed. You will need to remove the top half of the engine and use specialized tools to remove a slew of parts (timing chains or belts, etc.) and reinstall them.

You may want to consider professional service, as this can be quite complicated. If the head gasket has a minor leak only, however, you may be able to stop it with head gasket stop leak sealer. Just pour this stop leak fluid into the radiator. The coolant will carry it to the head gasket.

There, it will fill in any leaks, harden, and reseal the gasket. If this doesn’t work, you can always turn to a local service center for professional maintenance.

Repair Your Blown Head Gasket Today

You deserve to drive more safely on the roads of Gulfport, Long Beach, and Biloxi, Mississippi. If you’ve noticed the symptoms of a blown head gasket and are ready to address them, reach out to our certified technicians.

You can book an appointment< here at the Pat Peck Honda Service Center. Our experts will find the right way to repair your blown gasket and return your engine to prime running condition!

Sours: https://www.patpeckhonda.com/symptoms-of-a-blown-head-gasket-gulfport-ms/
BUDGET 1995-2000 CIVIC HEAD GASKET REPLACEMENT (209) 305-1672

January 27, 2014Updated: July 18, 2019By: Abraham Torres-ArredondoArticle ID: 544

How To Test A Blown Head Gasket (2001-2005 1.7L Honda Civic)

Checking to see if your 1.7L Honda Civic has suffered a blown head gasket can be done in 4 simple tests.

In this tutorial, I'll walk you through all 4 in a step-by-step way so that you can do these tests yourself (if you suspect your 1.7L Honda Civic has a blown head gasket).

Symptoms Of A Blown Head Gasket

If your Honda still starts and runs... the most common symptoms of a blown head gasket is that the engine overheats rapidly.

Here are a few other common symptoms a blown head gasket:

  1. Your Honda Civic is overheating. You've checked that:
    1. Thermostat is good.
    2. Both the radiator fan and condenser fan are working.
    3. Radiator is not busted (leaking coolant).
    4. Water pump is OK (not leaking coolant).
    5. Cooling system is full of coolant.
  2. White smoke is coming out of the tail-pipe and it smells like anti-freeze being cooked.
  3. Your Honda won't start. You've checked:
    1. There's spark coming from all 4 ignition coils.
    2. Fuel is reaching and being injected into the cylinders.
  4. The engine oil is thick and a tan to an off-white color.

TEST 1: Engine Oil The Color Of ‘Coffee With Too Much Creamer’

How To Test A Blown Head Gasket (2001-2005 1.7L Honda Civic)

The most common end result of a blown head gasket is coolant leaking into the crank case where it mixes with the engine oil.

As your Honda Civic's engine is cranked (or as it runs), the oil thoroughly mixes with the coolant and becomes milky white in color.

This can be confirmed by simply pulling out the dipstick and checking the color of the oil and that's what we'll do in this first test.

OK, I'll stop talking and we'll get this show on the road, this is what you need to do:

  1. 1

    Open your Honda's hood and pull out the engine oil dipstick.

    What you're looking for is to make sure that the engine oil IS NOT mixed with coolant. If the engine oil is mixed with coolant, it'll be the color of ‘coffee with too much creamer’.

  2. 2

    What color is the engine oil?

    1.) Is it a creamy tan/off-white color.

    2.) The engine oil will be its usual normal color.

Alright, let's interpret the color of the engine oil:

CASE 1: The color of the oil is a light tan, like coffee with too much creamer, and your Honda starts and overheats or does not start.. then this result confirms that you Honda's head gasket is blown.

If you're wondering why the oil looks like this? Well this is what happened:

1.) Your Honda overheated to the point that the cylinder head warped (since it's made out of aluminum). This led to the head gasket to burn.

2.) Once the head gasket burns and the head warps, the head gasket is unable to keep engine oil, coolant, and compression/ exhaust gases from mixing.

3.) This leads to the coolant entering the engine oil pan. As both of these mix, the result is an engine oil that is an off-white/tan color.

CASE 2: The color of the engine oil is normal. So far so good, but more testing is necessary to make sure the head gasket is not blown (especially if your Honda is overheating or not starting), go to: TEST 2: Coolant Shooting Out From Open Radiator.

Here's the reason why: In about 90% of the times, a blown head gasket will cause the engine's coolant to mix with the oil, but not always. And so another test or tests are needed to either confirm a blown head gasket or exonerate the head gasket as blown. The next test is to see if the engine's compression/combustion gases are escaping thru' the radiator.

Sours: https://troubleshootmyvehicle.com/honda/1.7L/how-to-test-a-blown-head-gasket-1

Head symptoms gasket civic honda

The Honda Civic is a line of cars produced and manufactured by Honda, a Japanese public multinational corporation that is well-known for its high-end cars and motorcycles. First made with a subcompact layout, the Civic has undergone numerous changes throughout the years. Some of these changes have occurred in the transmission and engine systems to try and reduce the prevalence of Honda Civic head gasket problems.

Auto Repairs Are EXPENSIVE


 

The body style changed throughout the generations of production, with the 2-door fastback lasting between 1972-2000 and the 4-door fastback between 1973 and 1978. The other type of body style was a hatchback, a 3-door model between 1972 and 2011, and the 5-door hatchback currently in production today.

 

The last body styles used by the Honda Civic nameplate are the 5-door station wagon produced between 1974-2006 and 2014-2017, the 4-door sedan from 1980-present, the 2-door coupe from 193-2020, and the 5-door liftback from 1995-2001.despite these changes in the body style, the numerous Honda Civic head gasket problems cause expensive repairs throughout the years.

 

The NHTSA, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, gave favorable rankings to the eighth generation of Honda Civic in terms of the crash test performance, ranking the car as “good” on both frontal and side crash impact tests. Earning 4 and 5 stars, the safety of this car sometimes outweighs the frequent Honda Civic head gasket problems when buyers consider purchasing a new Honda Civic. 

 

To determine if it is safe for you to buy a Civic, we must look at the function of the head gasket in your car, the signs of a faulty head gasket, the worst Honda Civic model years, and how much you can expect to pay to replace your head gasket. 

What is a Head Gasket?

 

When looking at the traditional car engine, you will find that a head gasket plays a crucial part in your vehicle’s inner workings. The head gasket is a ring or circular-shaped panel located between the cylinder head and engine block.

 

The cylinder head sits above the cylinders on top of the cylinder block, helping to form the closure on the top of the engine’s combustion chamber. The upper part of the engine is the cylinder head, while the lower part is commonly referred to as the engine block. If you find any issues with the cylinder head, engine block, or head gasket, these concerns can quickly lead to frequent Honda Civic head gasket problems. 

 

The engine block is the lower part of the engine that houses all of the major components of the bottom of your car's motor. This is where combustion occurs in an internal combustion engine and houses important components like the crankshaft.

 

As you can see, the head gasket, cylinder head, and engine block help make the engine run. Without these three components, your car would not be able to drive down the street.

 

The head gasket keeps any excess fluid from the engine from leaking into the cylinders. This barrier formed by the head gasket means that it is easily one of the most important components in the combustion chamber. Therefore, noticing any head gasket leak symptoms can help prevent future Honda Civic head gasket problems.

Worst Honda Civic Years – Honda Civic Head Gasket Problems

When looking at what years have the most prevalent Honda Civic head gasket problems, we need to look at the entire production span – dating between 1972 until the present. The worst model years in terms of reliability, safety, the severity of issues, and the expense of each repair are 2001, 2006, 2007, and 2008.

2001 Honda Civic 

The 2001 Civic has got it all – transmission problems, engine issues, and a dangerous defect with the front airbag that can cause extreme injury in the event of a crash. Although the airbag inflators were eventually recalled – 10 years later – the safety concerns, the transmission unreliability, and the Honda Civic head gasket problems are enough to deter users from purchasing this vehicle. 

 

The main engine concerns in the 2001 Honda Civic involve the exhaust manifold cracking, the engine failing, the car running roughly, the car burning excessive oil, the car accelerating roughly, the camshaft position sensor failing, and the head gasket cracking. The cracked head gasket led to coolant leaking from the exhaust manifold in the 2001 Civic, leading to an expensive repair of around $800.

2006 Honda Civic

The 2006 Honda Civic has numerous concerns with the engine, body and paint, interior accessories, and the wheels and hubs. The main engine concerns focus on the cracked engine block, the serpentine idler bolt failing, the engine mounts cracking, sudden acceleration, excessive oil consumption, and a blown head gasket. 

 

The most common solution is to replace the head gasket at around 95,000 miles, with the typical repair cost being $2,970 for most owners. 

2007 Honda Civic

The worst problem categories of the Honda Civic in the 2007 model year are the body and paint, wheels and hubs, interior accessories, and engine. The top concerns in the 2007 Honda Civic are a cracked engine block, side engine mount failure, engine surging, excessive oil consumption, blown engine, and rear motor mount failure. 

 

The most common solution is to rebuild the engine, replace the engine mount, or replace the entire engine for around 81,000 miles and cost around $2,700. Along with the frequent Honda Civic head gasket problems, the lack of reliability in performance and safety makes the 2007 Civic a poor choice for new car owners. 

2008 Honda Civic

The top Honda Civic issues in the 2008 year focus on the body and paint, interior accessories, and the engine. The engine category’s main concerns are the cracked engine block, bad engine mount, engine rattling when starting, excessive oil use, engine overheating, the oil leaking, and the head gasket blowing.

 

A blown head gasket repair will cost between $800 and $1600 to fix in the 2008 Civic, with the numerous Honda Civic head gasket problems leading to an expensive fix for car owners.

Testing For a Blown Head Gasket in Your Honda Civic – Honda Civic Head Gasket Problems

If you notice the Honda Civic head gasket problems, check for a blown head gasket immediately. A sure-fire way to determine whether the head gasket is the cause of your car’s issues is by examining the internal engine for any trace of combustion gas.

 

To repair the combustion gases, you need to purchase the correct tool or apparatus to see if the gas solution changes color after coming in contact with carbon monoxide. Carrying out this test requires the owner of the Honda Civic or the mechanic to follow three steps in precise order.

 

For step one, you need to lower the radiator’s coolant level to test for proper air space. The next steps involve warming the engine, using the diagnostic tool to test samples from the coolant, and mixing the samples in the testing solution to see if the color changes after combing in contact with carbon dioxide.

 

If you find the solution changes color and turns yellow, this means the coolant has failed your test. If this is the case, there is a problem that directly relates to the Honda Civic head gasket problems. Even though this test is sometimes unreliable, it typically lets the car owner know if there is a minuscule crack that can be hard to see just by the human eye.

Blown Head Gasket Repair Cost – Honda Civic Head Gasket Problems

After noticing the Honda Civic head gasket problems in your vehicle, you need to get ready to pay for the repair or replacement necessary to save your car. You can expect to pay around $1200 to fix the cracked head gasket at a franchise dealer. This fix will include the engine coolant and antifreeze, the cylinder head gasket kit, cylinder head bolts, engine oil, and engine oil filter.

 

The prices vary depending on what model and year of Honda Civic you currently own. If you decide to go the inexpensive route and use an independent garage for your repairs, then the prices will be lower across the board. Paying to fix the Honda Civic head gasket problems in a 2012 Civic will be between $650-$750, while a 2011 Civic will run you between $850 and $950. 

 

The cheapest model years for fixing the Honda Civic head gasket problems at an independent garage at the 1999 and 2000 years, with the average price estimate between $450 and $600. The more expensive options are the 2010 and 2011 models, with the price ranging between $800 and $950. 

The Bottom Line

Recognizing and diagnosing the Honda Civic head gasket problems in your vehicle can help you save the engine and transmission from undergoing severe damage. Repairing and replacing any damaged parts before the issues worsen can help your vehicle’s performance and reliability. Paying between $700 and $1,000 to repair a broken head gasket is a much better price than replacing your entire engine! 

Categories BlogSours: https://www.cashcarsbuyer.com/honda-civic-head-gasket-problems/
Best way to diagnose if your head gasket is bad

April 01, 2011Updated: December 14, 2020By: Abraham Torres-ArredondoArticle ID: 246

How To Test For A Blown Head Gasket (1.6L Honda Civic)

If your Honda Civic has a blown head gasket, it'll do one of two things: over-heat or not start. Now, if you have already verified that the cooling system is full of coolant, that the water pump is working, and that both the thermostat and radiator fan motor(s) are working too, then your Honda Civic probably has a blown head gasket. This article will show you how to verify this with four different tests.

Two of the Honda Civic blown head gasket tests don't require any tools to do and can be done under 5 minutes. The third blown head gasket test requires a compression tester and fourth a block tester. All four are very easy to do and will effectively let you know the condition of the head gasket on your Civic.

En Español You can find this tutorial in Spanish here: Cómo Probar El Empaque De La Cabeza (1.6L Honda Civic) (at: autotecnico-online.com).

Symptoms Of A Blown Head Gasket

The most common cause of a blown head gasket is that the engine overheated due to one of the following: 1) The radiator fan not working, 2) Engine has No Coolant, due to a leak somewhere in the cooling system 3) Thermostat went bad and is stuck closed. The most common symptoms a blown head gasket are:

  1. Your car or mini-van is overheating. You know it's not the fan or thermostat.
  2. White smoke is coming out of the tail-pipe and it smells like Anti-Freeze being cooked.
  3. The car or mini-van won't start.
    1. You have already verified it's not an ignition system problem because you have spark coming out at all of the spark plug wires.
    2. You know it's not a lack of fuel, because you have verified that the fuel pump is delivering fuel to the fuel injectors.
  4. The engine oil is thick and tan to off-white color.

HEAD GASKET TEST 1: Engine Oil The Color Of ‘Coffee With Too Much Creamer’

How To Test For A Blown Head Gasket (1.6L Honda Civic)

This first test is a simple test and checks for one of the most common results of a blown head gasket on a Honda Civic which is coolant mixing with the engine oil.

In most cases, this is probably the only test you may have to do, to verify a blown head gasket, and not have to do the other two tests. But if this test doesn't conclusively verify a blown head gasket, then by all means proceed to the other two head gasket tests.

OK, I'll stop talking and we'll get this show on the road, this is what you need to do:

  1. 1

    Open your Honda's hood.

  2. 2

    Check the condition of the engine oil by pulling out the engine oil dipstick.

  3. 3

    You're gonna' see one of two things:

    1.) The engine oil will be a creamy tan/off-white color.

    2.) The engine oil will be its usual normal color.

Alright, let's interpret the color of the engine oil:

CASE 1: The color of the oil is a light tan, like coffee with too much creamer, and your Honda Civic starts and overheats or does not start.. then this result confirms that you Honda Civic's head gasket is blown.

If you're wondering why the oil looks like this? Well this is what happened:

1.) Your Honda Civic overheated to the point that the cylinder head warped (since it's made out of aluminum). This led to the head gasket to burn.

2.) Once the head gasket burns and the head warps, the head gasket is unable to keep engine oil, coolant, and Compression/ exhaust gases from mixing.

3.) This leads to the coolant entering the engine oil pan. As both of these mix, the result is an engine oil that is an off-white/tan color.

CASE 2: The color of the engine oil is normal. So far so good, but more testing is necessary to make sure the head gasket is not blown (especially if your Honda Civic is overheating or not starting), go to: HEAD GASKET TEST 2: Coolant Shooting Out From Open Radiator.

Here's the reason why: In about 90% of the times, a blown head gasket will cause the engine's coolant to mix with the oil, but not always. And so another test or tests are needed to either confirm a blown head gasket or exonerate the head gasket as blown. The next test is to see if the engine's compression/combustion gases are escaping thru' the radiator.

Sours: https://troubleshootmyvehicle.com/honda/1.6L/how-to-test-the-head-gasket-1

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