Clay boxes with lids ideas

Clay boxes with lids ideas DEFAULT
Personal Clay Box

An Art Lesson by Marvin Bartel, Ed.D.

Emeritus Professor of Art, Ceramics and Art Education

Goshen College

Goshen, Indiana 46526


Objectives   media practice   Creating Ideas   Construction
Drying      Finishing     Style  Decoration   Design Principles
Creativity     Why Make Requirements    Art History and Other's Art

Note: If you are reading a paper copy of this page, using this Internet URL gives you live links to related resources. http://www.goshen.edu/~marvinpb/lessons/box.html

Lesson Objectives

  • Students learn to generate, sort, and develop ideas for content in their artwork. 
  • Students learn to assemble and finish a lidded box-like form from slabs of clay half way between soft and leatherhard. 
  • Build a frame of reference for the work of art by accomplished artists who have made similar work.
Age  This lesson is appropriate from grade 4 to adult.  

Media skill preparation and practice

The teacher does notshow any examples or pictures of clay boxes before this assignment. To do so defeats the learning objectives of the assignment. However, students who have been dependent on seeing an example may feel lost.  One way to help them do better is to provide a chance to become familiar with the materials and processes that they will be using. 

If the students are not familiar with clay slab forming and joining, the teacher gives them a structured practice session where every student has some hands on practice.  In no event should a teacher simply do a demonstration while the students are asked to carefully pay attention and watch to see the demo. 

A Chinese proverb says: "Tell me and I forget. Show me and I remember.
Have me do it and I understand."

In this "preliminary experiment and practice" the students are not told the outcome.  They follow the experimental process and learn the outcome by experience.

Materials needed by each student: 

  • a sharp pencil or toothpick
  • a popsicle stick or similar tool
  • any simple knife or a needle tool that will cut clay
  • a piece of heavy cloth or unpainted canvass to work on
  • a soaking wet paper towel
  • some clay slip with a brush (this can be shared at a table)
  • a piece of clay slightly larger than an egg 

1. Every student flattens the clay the thickness of the pinkie finger. 

There are many ways to flatten clay, but the objective is to flatten it so that the thickness is more or less uniform.  If it gets too thin, just have them make a ball and do it again.  If it sticks to the cloth, pull the cloth off by pulling the cloth sideways from the clay. 

An enjoyable method is to have students use a foot to tap it flat between layers of canvas.  Larger pieces will not be uniform unless they practice a bit.  Sometimes we remove our shoes and gently dance the clay flat inside a folded canvas - being sensitive about not getting some too thin and not leaving some too thick.  We poke it with a needle tool or toothpick to analyze thickness.  Pulling the canvas off intermittently allows for the clay to flatten easier.

2. Every student cuts it into four parts by making an X shaped cut.

Method I -- Every student takes two of the pieces and sets them together to make a butt joint so the clay forms an L shape from two slabs. 

Using a popsicle stick or similar tool they gently smooth the seams until the seam is invisible.

Method II -- Every student takes the two remaining pieces and sets them together AFTER they the adjoining clay parts have been scratched (scored) with the point of pencil or a toothpick tool.  Scratches are 1/8 inch or closer. 

1. Some slip is added to the scratched adjoining surfaces.  Slip is make from the same clay, but has enough water to be like think cream.

2. The scored and slipped clay is joined with a slight pressure while attempting to slide the adjoining parts back and forth until they grip each other.

3. The inside corner of the L shape has a small coil of clay added and it is pressed down into the joint with many very small and very gentle actions of the popsicle stick.  The round end of the stick drags back and forth to smooth the inside corner.

4.  No water is allowed during any of the joining, but for a final finish a three inch square of wet paper toweling can be used like a thin sponge to smooth things.

5. Every student, using a popsicle stick or similar tool gently smoothes the exterior seam until the seam is invisible. 

Testing the Methods -- Every student is required to pull apart both clay joints in order to learn which one is stronger.

Discuss the results.  This part of the lesson is more scientific than artistic, but life is full of art based on science and science based on art.              top of page

Creating Idea Lists

As was mentioned above, the teacher does notshow any examples or pictures of clay boxes before this assignment.  This is not an assignment in "learning by imitation."  This is an assignment in learning how to creatively generate one's own ideas for artwork.

The instructor encourages the class to generate the questions they would ask a stranger in order to get to know that person. Students write answers to these questions.  The answers are about themselves. The instructor does not ask any of the questions unless or until they no longer can come up with any and they have missed some important categories. They generally ask about favorite music, instruments, sports, equipment, recreation, hobbies, leisure time activity, family history, family vocations, magazines they like, and so on. If the box is to be a gift, they make the list about the user.  See this link for an expanded explanation of this process.

After the list of answers is fairly long, they make small sketches or symbols next to each word. Think of sketches as visual lists. Artists make visual lists to develop and elaborate good ideas and to eliminate weak ideas.

It is also helpful to have students make a list of items that could be stored in a clay box. This can be done by having them get in groups of three or four and brainstorm lists. After the groups have written their lists ask them to share the ideas with the class. The group with the most unique items (things not included in any other groups list) wins the contest.

Even with all this practice in idea generation, teachers may still need to prohibit some ideas because they are too common.  It may be wise to ask every student to list their box theme idea.  Once an idea is taken, no other student may use the same idea.  Or, at least if they do, they must not be working at the same table on in the same group.                  top of page

Construction

The shape of each box is unique and based on the student's interests

The bottom slab is first cut in a shape symbolizing one thing from the student's list. Tell students that the best boxes are those that are special shapes that no other students make. If more than one student wants to make the same shape, have them meet and negotiate ways to make each one different. For example, if there are two or three hearts, they need to list more love symbols. There are many other gifts of love. If there are two or more that still insist on making hearts, they can be placed far from each other and they can be required to add decoration without seeing the other person's work.

Students assemble slabs using scoring and slip. They fill in corners to make the interiors easy to clean and sturdy. Wads of paper are inserted to keep tops from sagging. The tops are sealed on. See "finishing" below. 

WARNING.  It is really tempting to show the class some fine examples before they work.  When not showing examples, be prepared to ask students to listen, to think, to practice, to imagine, and to dream.  Yes, it can take more time. For me the time is less important than whether or not they are being artists. I do not need more products per semester as much as I need more learning per product.Sometimes I see a glow in their faces as they work - especially when I acknowledge an important personal innovation they have designed into their work. "The best boxes come from the students who think outside the box."

Drying 

  1. Keep your box project wrapped in plastic unless you are constantly checking on it.
  2. Even after it is cut open and finished do not set it on the shelf to dry out in the open, but dry it SLOWLY while you check on it periodically.  

For a more complete coverage of box drying problems see: Hint #6:  Preventing Cracked Slab Boxes

Finishing

  1. Cut the box open by cutting around the sides in a tapered notched or wave pattern.  Cut it with a very thin knife point. 
  2. Make waves deep enough. The lid should not slide off in any direction.
  3. Use a wood paddle to gently refine the exterior.
  4. Use metal rib to remove lumps and the exterior lines the joints show.
  5. Use small amounts of clay to fill divots and dimples in the surface.The inside needs to be refined. 
  6. The top will need a small coil added to fill the joint on the inside. 
  7. Use thick slip to prepare the joint for the coil to be smoothed into the joint.
  8. Similarly, fill vertical corners with coils if they need it.                  top of page
Style
Having listed all these finishing criteria, it must be added that it is also very valid to make raw edges and raw clay joints if the artist's style requires it. In speaking about mass media, Marshall McLuhan said, "The medium is the message."  As clay artist, I think the medium and the process is the message.  If the artist wavers between "slick tech" and "abstract action-expression," the effect may be weak, ambiguous, and confusing.  However, if the artist is brash, convincing, and consistent, it can be very strong work. 

In music we don't expect a folk singer to start performing hard rock and don't expect a rock singer to mix in smooth melodic ballads.  Just as in music, visual style portrays the artist's conviction, consistent mood, and aesthetic stance reflecting a particular artist's preferences. Students are not expected to have a mature style, but they are expected to practice creating consistent style, albeit temporary or experimental for them. 
Decoration

Something supportive of the main idea must be incorporated in the decoration. Requiring decoration is a good way to encourage more creative problem solving experience. There are many ways to decorate, including:

  1. Paint with slip. Glaze with more than one glaze.
  2. Add some clay to build up pattern, picture, or texture (relief sculptured surface).
  3. Remove some of the colored slip (sgraffito) to create pattern, picture, or texture.
  4. Incise lines in the surface to create a drawing,
  5. Find items to stamp into the surface.
  6. On a new piece, pre texture the clay.
  7. Add pieces on the bottom to raise it off the table a bit.
  8. Add handles.
  9. Using a stamp designed by the student with an idea based on the student's self descriptive list 
  10. Words relating to the user, the contents, or meaning intended. 
Design Principles to be Considered While Planning and Working 
  1. Unity (avoid parts or visual aspects that are overly distracting or out of place).
  2. Variety and Harmony (make it interesting to look by using "visually related parts"). 

  3. Some ways to do it
    Repeat a shape while changing the shape's size, color, or texture. 
    Repeat the size, but change the shape, texture or color. 
    Keep mixing and matching the visual elements (line, shape, texture, color, tone or value).
  4. Subject matter (image) has power to incite the imagination.  Use images unexpectedly to surprise, enlighten, confound, and delight the user. 
  5. Function and usefulness has power to reward the user.  Use function unexpectedly to surprise, enlighten, confound, and delight the user.                top of page

HOW DO CREATIVE DESIGNERS THINK AND WORK?   (some quick thoughts)
  1. Creative designers intentionally make lists of ideas.
  2. Creative designers intentionally make lists of sketches
  3. Creative designers often repeat the same sketch with many variations.
  4. Creative designers hate to copy, but they love to see how other designers think and surprise us.
  5. Creative designers seek outfeedback from those whose opinions they value.
  6. Creative designers push boundaries of function, materials, and fabrication processes.
  7. Creative designers are constantly looking for other alternatives - even opposites are more apt to be considered by creative minds than by the average person. 

Why Make Requirements when Teaching Art and Creativity?
 
Art teachers are often tempted to say, "On this project you can do whatever you want to do." A very small percentage of the students are naturally inclined to take the risk and the effort to be truly creative when given this option. In a few situations, advanced students have been well conditioned not to get by with clicheª work. 

Typically, students are apt to do the safe thing. They will make another one of whatever they have made in the past that was passing. This is not a way to achieve growth. It encourages mediocrity. 

    Some students do not like the requirements and request to be excused from the requirements. The teacher must ask for the student's proposal. If the proposal actually shows creative problem solving for that student, the teacher can feel justified in allowing an exception. Other students will less likely complain if they know they have to come up with a better and more risky alternative in order to be excused from the assigned limitations. 
 


Connections to Art History and Other Art                             top of page
 
After students have made their own work, study professional examples.  Assign videos, some slides, books, journals, and/or web pages that have slab constructed work and or work that has special meaning. Jack Earl's (Ohio) ceramics comes to mind. The whole West Coast Funk movement in the 60's and 70's had lots of work that could be studied. John Glick (Michigan) has made many beautiful stoneware boxes. 

    Journals and your favorite Internet search engine will show many examples of this work.

    I believe that one of the best ways for students to make connections with professional work is to have students present what they find by other artists. Have a discussion in class and test the class on these presentations. Asking students to write critiques of work by professionals will help them reach the stage of critical and reflective thinking. 

Other Lessons and Teaching Ideas
Bartelart.comArt Lessons PageCreativity Killers
  Goshen College Art DepartmentTeaching Creativity
Marvin Bartel Courses   Marvin Bartel Home
 Marvin Bartel ArtworkConducting a Critique

Note: If you are reading a paper copy of this page, using this Internet URL gives you live links to related resources. http://www.goshen.edu/~marvinpb/lessons/box.html

All rights reserved.  © Marvin Bartel, 2000, all rights reserved - For permission or copy or publish this page you may contact the author. If you are a teacher, you may make one copy for yourself if you keep this paragraph with your copy.

You are invited to make a link to this page from you page without getting permission.
updated November 1,  2005 ©
top of page

Sours: http://people.goshen.edu/~marvinpb/lessons/box.html

You’ll be surprised of how many ideas one can get by simply looking over the window. I live in one of the capitals of the world. It is a busy city and the only way to not feel constrained by this aspect was a cute little apartment, across the street from the park. I just love to drink my coffee outside on the balcony! Half asleep and with my messy morning face when I went out with the coffee this morning I sow something special: a beautiful little girl (2 yr) with her mother. She was carrying a box about as big as she was. This image woke me up even faster than the coffee! Consequently today is about the boxes of our childhood.

Making a box may be a pretty easy and fun task to do. We all have in our home boxes, now it’s the perfect time to recycle them! The complexity of the process depends of the idea you have. Below you can find some nice ideas of diy fimo box. You can choose to enjoy them or you can give them. It will be a nice gift for family, friends and school teachers.

And why not aim high? When you can ask her the big question, why not have a fimo handmade engagement ring box? You’ll surprise her not only with the ring, but also with the unique box hat will say so much about your personality!!!!

Enjoy the boxes!

  1. polymer clay box – artist: beadizzygrl

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2. fimo box – artist: Morgan McGrath

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3. fimo box – artist: Morgan McGrath

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4. fimo box – artist: paroledepate.canalblog.com

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5. polymer clay box – artist: subtledetails

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6. fimo box – artist: Clayart

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7. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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8. fimo box – artist: PenelopeStern

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9. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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10. fimo box – artist: CraftyClayStudio

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11. fimo box – artist: fulgorine

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12. fimo box – artist: KPcharms

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13. fimo box – artist: Felicianation

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14. fimo box – artist: Carrie Harvey

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15. fimo box – artist: TheFlyingViper

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16. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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17. fimo box – artist: fionaabel-smith.co.uk

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18. polymer clay box – artist: Liz and Frog

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19. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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20. fimo box – artist: CraftyClayStudio

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21. fimo box – artist: fulgorine

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22. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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23. fimo box – artist: judy-nolan.com

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24. fimo box – artist: KPcharms

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25. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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26. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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27. fimo box – artist: ArteDiAmore

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28. fimo box – artist: Necrosarium

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29. fimo box – artist: SonsationalCreations

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30. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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31. fimo box – artist: Felicianation

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32. fimo box – artist: fulgorine

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33. fimo box – artist: RoyalKitness

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34. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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35. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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36. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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37. fimo box – artist: ArteDiAmore

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38. fimo box – artist: raspberrylab

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39. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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40. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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41. fimo box – artist: fionaabel-smith.co.uk

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42. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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43. fimo box – artist: RoyalKitness

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44. fimo box – artist: mandarin-duck.com

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45. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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46. fimo box – artist: polymerclayworkshop

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47. fimo box – artist: CraftyClayStudio

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48. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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49. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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50. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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51. fimo box – artist: ArteDiAmore

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52. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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53. fimo box – artist: raspberrylab

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54. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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55. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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56. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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57. fimo box – artist: thepolymerarts.com

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58. fimo box – artist: ColorfulClay

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59. fimo box – artist: KPcharms

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60. fimo box – artist: polypediaonline.com

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61. fimo box – artist: slodive.com

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62. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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63. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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64. fimo box – artist: fionaabel-smith.co.uk

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65. fimo box – artist: Claybykim

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66. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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67. fimo box – artist: Saartj1e

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68. fimo box – artist: ColorfulClay

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69. fimo box – artist: MilleFolliedellaRo

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70. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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71. fimo box – artist: ArteDiAmore

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72. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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73. fimo box – artist: slodive.com

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74. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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75. fimo box – artist: raspberrylab

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76. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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77. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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78. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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79. fimo box – artist: RoyalKitness

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80. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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81. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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82. fimo box – artist: Laura Griffin

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83. fimo box – artist: ClayScenes

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84. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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85. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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86. fimo box – artist: ColorfulClay

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87. fimo box – artist: ArteDiAmore

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88. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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89. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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90. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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91. fimo box – artist: MilleFolliedellaRo

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92. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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93. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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94. fimo box – artist: Saartj1e

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95. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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96. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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97. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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98. fimo box – artist: pcagoe.com

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99. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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100. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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101. fimo box – artist: bedfordcollegeoflacemaking.com

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102. fimo box – artist: ArteDiAmore

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103. fimo box – artist: MagicoMondoDiPLOPPI

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104. fimo box – artist: AHHA

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105. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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106. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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107. fimo box – artist: AHHA

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108. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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109. fimo box – artist: Tina Holden

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110. fimo box – artist: AHHA

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111. fimo box – artist: ColorfulClay

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112. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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113. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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114. Halloween witch polymer clay box – artist: raspberrylab

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115. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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116. fimo box – artist: liveinternet.ru

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117. polymer clay box – artist: Saru-Hime

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118. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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119. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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120. fimo box – artist: MilleFolliedellaRo

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121. clay star box – artist: ArteDiAmore

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122. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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123. fimo box – artist: MandarinMoon

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124. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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125. fimo box – artist: ArteDiAmore

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126. fimo box – artist: ColorfulClay

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127. fimo box – artist: vebidoo.de

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128. fimo box – artist: stylehive.com

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129. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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130. spring jewelry box  – artist: AHHA

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131. fimo box – artist: raspberrylab

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132. fimo box – artist: desiredcreations.com

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133. fimo box – artist: raspberrylab

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134. fimo box – artist: Miyaka89

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135. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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136. fimo box – artist: Saru-Hime

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137. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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138. fimo box – artist: Belilmalebridia

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139. fimo box – artist: ColorfulClay

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140. fimo box – artist: JillsTreasureChest

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141. fimo box – artist: pathartdesigns.com

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142. fimo box – artist: polymerclayshed

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143. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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144. fimo box – artist: Felicianation

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145. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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146. fimo box – artist: jkay jewelry

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147. fimo box – artist: TinfoilHalo

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148. fimo box – artist: claytheism

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149. fimo box – artist: jkay jewelry

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150. fimo box – artist: IntotheDawnDesigns

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Don’t forget to follow my Pinterest page to get new ideas and updates on free fimo/polimeric clay diy tutorials.

Sours: https://www.fimodiy.com/decor/dyi-150-polymer-clay-box-ideas.html
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Personal Clay Box Sculpture

Grade Level: 7th Grade Art
Unit: African Art - Symbolism - Adinkra - Ceramics
Lesson plan: Personal Clay Box

Adapted from lesson by Marvin Bartel

Lesson Objectives

  • Students learn to search for and sort ideas for content in their artwork.

  • Students learn to use personal symbols in creating a work of art

  • Students learn appreciation for art from other cultures: African Art

  • Students learn to assemble and finish a lidded box-like form from slabs of clay half way between soft and leather-hard.

  • Build a frame of reference for the work of art by accomplished artists who have made similar work.

Materials for African inspired:

Moist Clay, Wire End Clay Tool Set, Canvas Rolls., Rolling Pins., guide sticks, cardboard box mold, Soft-Kut Printing Blocks. 2"x2" (5 x 5 cm) squares for stamps, Linoleum Cutters., Slip dishes, acrylic stain. for finish, Glazes. for interior, Brushes.


ceramic clay boxceramic clay box

Creating Idea Lists

Start with a list of questions and they have to write the answers about themselves. They get into favorite music, instruments, sports, equipment, recreation, hobbies, leisure time activity, family history, family vocations, magazines they like, and so on. If the box is to be a gift, they make the list about the user.

After the list of words is fairly long, they make small sketches or symbols next to each word. Think of sketches as visual lists. Artists make visual lists to develop and elaborate good ideas and to eliminate weak ideas. These symbols will be used to make the Soft-cut stamps. A different symbol can be carved in each side of the stamp. One side if the stamp may be an Adinkra symbol.

It is also helpful to have students make a list of items that could be stored in a clay box. This can be done by having them get in groups of three or four and brainstorming lists. After the groups have written their lists ask them to share the ideas with the class.

Construction 

Students will make stamps with the 2" (5 cm) square Soft-kut plates - creating symbols to represent themselves. The stamps are used to pre-texture the sides of the box. Make cardboard box to help support slabs. Our boxes were about 6" x 9" (15 x 23 cm). American cheese boxes from the cafeteria were also used for a long and narrow box. We cut the cheese boxes on the table saw to 2" (5 cm) deep.

The bottom slab is first cut in the shape to fit inside cardboard box. Roll out slab of clay large enough for side of box. Stamp with personal stamps (close together). Cut slabs to fit inside box. Wrap slabs up over night. Students assemble slabs inside cardboard box using scoring and slip. They fill in corners with a thin coil to make the interiors easy to clean and sturdy. Wads of paper are inserted to keep tops from sagging. Slabs are fused to the bottom of lid to fit just inside the box to keep lid from sliding. Measure inside dimension of box to insure correct size and placement of slabs.

Decorate lid. Add sculptural elements. Optional: Foil tooled insert.

Decoration

Something supportive of the main idea must be incorporated in the decoration. Requiring decoration is a good way to encourage more creative problem solving experience. There are many ways to decorate, including:

  • Pre-textured slabs

  • Adding clay to the surface - head, tail and legs can be added to turn into an animal (African inspired). some students added small animals to the lid.

  • Using a stamp designed by the student with an idea based on the list

  • Incised lines

  • Underglazes and glazes

  • Words relating to the user, the contents, or meaning intended.

Videos

African Secrets Visual Arts and Craft. - The episode focuses on stone and metal sculpture, painting, batik printing, basket weaving and pottery, among other forms of art. It unveils the secret behind artist's conceptualization of art. It also tells on the administration of the visual arts industry in the country.

African Art Techniques: Wood, Cloth, Metal, Clay. - Detailed footage of the techniques African artists use to carve wooden masks and stools, to cast brass, smelt and forge iron, to spin, dye, and weave cotton cloth, and to form and fire pottery.

Connections to Art History and Other Art :

African Art Video:


Sours: https://www.incredibleart.org/lessons/middle/Lessons/7box.htm
Cool Polymer Clay Art Ideas. Clay DIY'S. Creative Simple Ideas. Kawaii DIY toys

More Ideas for Polymer Clay Plastic Storage Boxes

Ideas For Polymer Clay Storage

Vid #68: This Plastic Embroidery Thread Box is “Sew” Terrific for Storing Polymer Clay Canes:

I know my posts have been pretty corny over the last couple of days. “Something Fishy” yesterday and “Sew Terrific” today. But hopefully you are at least getting a few good storage ideas for keeping your polymer clay safe and protected.

As I said yesterday, if you are going to store any kind of polymer clay (Primo, Fimo, Sculpey, Kato, etc) in plastic containers, you must make sure that the type of plastic used to make the storage box, is actually compatible with the clay.

I can tell you with confidence that my Beechwood brand, plastic embroidery box works just fine with all of my polymer clay. The small compartments inside of this box are perfect for keeping short lengths of cane organized and well protected.

Cindy Lietz SignaturePolymer Clay Tutor


 

 

 

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3 Free Polymer Clay Videos
>> Polymer Clay Tutorials <<

The full version of the Embroidery Box” preview video shown above, is available for purchase at my Polymer Clay Bead Making Videos Library in the Volume-004 Back Issue Package.

This “Embroidery Storage Box” video tutorial is part of my ongoing series on being resourceful when it comes to ideas for polymer clay storage.

Sours: https://www.beadsandbeading.com/blog/ideas-for-polymer-clay-storage/78/

Lids with ideas boxes clay

Best DIY Pottery Kits 2021

Discover the best DIY pottery kits in 2021 and turn your house into a dreamy ceramics studio! There's nothing better than making your own handmade pottery – and it's especially perfect for those quiet nights when you're looking for new things to do at home. In fact, playing with clay is so good for your wellbeing that a psychology centre in Canada has just introduced pottery as a form of treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. These artisan pottery kits are an exciting way to switch off, practice a little self-care and get creative at home, regardless of whether you're looking for rainy day activities or things to do in lockdown. 

 

Learning how to build, sculpt and shape clay is one of the most engaging things to do when bored at home, but it's also incredibly therapeutic. Discovering how to make pottery has been linked to improvements in mental wellbeing and is regularly used as a form of art therapy by medical professionals, making it the perfect choice when looking for things to do at home that benefits. You'll notice a boost in your mood, increased focus and an overall sense of accomplishment after a few blissful hours of clay play!

 

With DIY craft kits and pottery boxes, you can master the arts of ceramic from your living room with our live-streaming classes and craft kit delivery service. We’ve handpicked some of the best pottery kits we have available for you to check out.
 

Introduction to Figurative Sculpting

Finding a comprehensive pottery-at-home kit has never been easier thanks to Irina from imakesculptures in Surry Hills. Irina has assembled one of our most exciting and unique craft kits for adults: a clay sculpting workshop with a focus on portraits! This craft box and the accompanying live online class will give you a thorough explanation of all the materials you’ll be using, and their uses and versatility within the discipline.

You’ll be shown the basics of sculpting techniques so you can master the fundamentals, therefore giving you more freedom as you improve with your pottery skills. Once you’ve got the hang of things, you’ll have the opportunity to build a striking multi-dimensional portrait under the guidance of your ceramicist Irina, who will be present via live stream. This craft box is perfect for anyone look for a unique pottery experience where you'll learn the impressive skill of figurative sculpting from an expert! For more creative DIYs at home, discover soy candle making kits here.

 

Clay Hand Building for Kids Pottery Kit

This is one of the best pottery kits for kids on offer! Combining traditional hand-building clay techniques with your little one’s imagination, Luxury Clay Experiences will enable your children how to build a magical object using traditional moulding clay. The clay is organic and toxin-free, making it a wonderful option for your little ones.

They’ll learn how to apply effective pottery tips and tricks to building a unique object that’s completely their own and, unlike other pottery kits, what they end up making is entirely up to them. Luxury Clay Designs specialises in natural, air-drying clay that doesn't require firing, making it one of the best indoor activities for kids.

 


A Mindful Clay Hand Building Kit

Founder of popular riverside ceramics studio, Not Yet Perfect, Lucy is now offering ceramic-enthusiasts across Australia the chance to learn clay hand-building and reap the relaxing rewards of this therapeutic process with an all-inclusive DIY pottery kit. This kit is not only perfect if you've been searching for fun indoor activities, but it also offers up a few hours of rest and rejuvenation, wherever and whenever you need it most.

You'll be able to learn basic pottery for beginners and creating some funky ceramics you can be proud of. Your pieces might not be perfect but that's the point! Her philosophy is all about leaning into imperfection, embracing the mess and accepting your mistakes – both in life and in art. After all, it’s the story behind your favourite mug that brings it to life!

DIY pottery kit

 

DIY Polymer Clay Jewellery Kit

This one isn’t strictly a pottery course, but as far as creative craft kits for adults go, it's not to be missed! Not only does it combine the therapeutic elements of jewellery-making, but you’ll also be building your own DIY earrings out of polymer clay.

Our virtual classes cover a vast array of arts and craft genres, and this one rolls the fun of jewellery-making and pottery into one! What's more, the only things you'll have to get started are an oven and a clean surface to work on. Perfect for beginners who love to get creative at home, this craft kit is sure to appease both the jewellery-lover and the craftsperson within you.

 

Make Ceramics At-Home Pottery Kit

Transform a block of clay into whatever your heart desires with this at-home pottery kit! Playing with clay is the perfect activity for a Sunday afternoon or if you're searching for new date night ideas at home. In this craft box, you'll receive everything you need to get started with your own pottery creations at home, whether that be a mug, a planter or a quirky sculpture! Zen out for a few hours as you enjoy the therapeutic benefits of this tactile craft, Vogue has even plugged pottery as the next big mindfulness trend.  

The best part? Once you finish the one or two kilograms of clay provided with the DIY craft kit, all you need to go is grab some more clay of your choice from your local craft store and you're set up with the rest of the pottery tools for beginners! Say hello to your new favourite hobby and goodbye to your endless of search of things to do when bored. 

DIY pottery kit

 

DIY Clay Hand-Building Pottery Kit

Covering all the basics, this pottery kit will show you how to get the most out of learning how to make pottery without using a wheel! You’ll learn how to effectively shape and mould clay, how to smoothen it out effectively, how to join clay pieces together to create larger and more intricate pieces to enjoy. These craft kits for adults are also suitable for slightly older kids and teens who are interested in learning the finer points of pottery, or looking to expand on skills they may already have. 

 

DIY Marbled Mug Craft Box

The only thing better than an at-home pottery kit? One that empowers you to make your own mug, of course! While pottery classes are fun, the best part about them is coming home with a useful vessel that you can use every day (providing it's been fired, of course). With this hands-on craft kit, you'll discover how to make your own unique mug and paint it with a beautiful, marble-like pattern. You'll get everything you need to build your mug and to apply the colourants to your wet piece, prior to firing.

 

Make a Clay Planter Pottery Kit

In need of fun indoor activities and things to do during lockdown? In this live streaming class, you will make a clay hanging planter using either air-drying clay or natural clay! You will create a little clay hanger with beautiful textures and colours, learn how to build a pot, how to paint the clay while it is still fresh and how to play with a variety of shapes. You'll then make some beads to decorate and hang the planter. You'll also learn how to weave a little macrame hanger to take your DIY pot from zero to hero! This DIY pottery kit is ideal as a gift for a loved one who wants to add a bit of a green touch to their interior.

Sours: https://classbento.com.au/best-diy-pottery-kits
Clay at Home: Jewelry Boxes with Corrine

Clay Inlay Boxes

Thanks to Anne Igou for this project.

Materials and Tools:

acrylic recipe box
Austrian crystals
copper tape
craft knife
clay blade
card stock
rubber brayer
acrylic rod
clay-dedicated pasta machine
automotive protectant spray
two-part epoxy
ruler
ceramic tile work surface
Lisa Pavelka Designer Series Victorian stamps
Ranger Perfect Powders: Interference Blue, Forever Red
Kato Polyclay blocks: 2-3/4 white, 3/4 copper, 1/2 turquoise, 3-1/2 violet

Steps:

1. Condition all clays thoroughly before use.

2. Mix one block violet and one block white clay together. Roll out on the second-thickest setting of the pasta machine and set aside.

3. On a piece of card stock, sprinkle a small amount of Forever Red Perfect Pearls Powder. Roll the rubber brayer over the card stock, coating the entire roller with powder.

4. Place stamp face-up on ceramic tile.

5. Roll rubber brayer on top of the stamp, leaving powder on the raised portions of the stamp.

6. Gently place the sheet of clay on top of the powdered stamp.

7. Using the acrylic rod, roll the clay over the stamp using firm and even pressure. Remove clay.

8. Trim sheet to measure 4-3/4" x 6".

9. Repeat steps 2 through 7 to create two more patterned sheets using the same colors. Trim one sheet to 5-1/2" x 4" and another to 2-1/2" x 4" .

10. Roll out copper clay on the second-thickest setting of the pasta machine.

11. Repeat steps 3 through 7 using Ranger Perfect Pearls Interference Blue powder instead of the red.

12. Trim to create two sheets measuring 5-1/4" x 4".

13. Place all finished pieces on ceramic tile and set aside.

14. To make the canes: Roll one-half block of copper clay into a 2" x 1/2" long rod.

15. Roll two-and-a-half blocks of white clay separately through pasta machine on the thickest setting. Double the thickness of the sheet by placing each sheet on top of the other. Wrap the sheet around the copper rod and trim away excess.

16. Roll one-half block of turquoise clay through pasta machine on the third-thickest setting. Wrap sheet around rod and trim excess.

17. Mix one-quarter block of violet and one-quarter block of white clay, and roll through pasta machine on the thickest setting. Wrap sheet around rod and trim excess.

18. Roll one-quarter block of violet clay through pasta machine on third-thickest setting. Wrap sheet around rod and trim away excess.

19. Roll one-quarter block of copper clay through pasta machine on the thickest setting. Wrap sheet around rod and trim away excess.

20. Roll one-quarter block of violet clay through pasta machine on third-thickest setting. Wrap sheet around rod and trim away excess.

21. Reduce rod by rolling back and forth to 9 inches in length.

22. Pinch one side of the rod to create a teardrop shape all along the length of the rod. Slice rod into three 3-inch sections.

23. Place each section together to form a semicircle.

24. Slice semicircle in half and place together to form a whole circle.

25. Reduce the cane by squeezing and pulling from the inside out. Continue to reduce the cane until rod is 4 inches long.

26. Cut rod into four 1-inch sections. Piece sections together to form a square. Trim excess.

27. Roll one block of violet clay through pasta machine on third-thickest setting. Slice the cane into thin slices and place evenly all over this violet sheet. Roll acrylic rod over top of the sheet to smooth seams.

28. Strips of the sheet need to be cut in the following measurements:

2 strips 6" x 3/4" with diagonal corners
2 strips 4" x 1" with diagonal corners

For the front of the box:

2 strips 6" x 1/2" with diagonal corners
2 strips 4-1/2" x 1/2" with diagonal corners

29. Bake all pieces on a ceramic tile at 275 F degrees for 30 minutes. Allow to cool completely.

30. Adhere all pieces to the box using two-part epoxy.

31. Draw a bead of craft glue in the seams of clay pieces on box. Remove paper backing on copper tape and adhere to seams on top of glue. Allow glue to dry.

Sours: https://www.hgtv.com/design/make-and-celebrate/handmade/clay-inlay-boxes

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He changed, sat down at the table and laid out his papers in front of him. Don't you think we need to talk. - I began. Well, come on, not today, you see that I have no time at all.



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